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August 07, 1964 - Image 25

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1964-08-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Charles Levin in
c Race for Senate
in 6th District

CHARLES LEVIN

WSU Prof. Boaz Siegel's Baci-figi-oand Nensner's History JNF Approach Suggested
as Israel's Basic Policy
in Plastic Now in for Acquisition of Land
Commended by Judgeship Backers
JERUSALEM (JTA )—The need
The more than 1,500 lawyers
Improved
Form
for a more basic and comprehen-
now practicing in Michigan who

have acquired part of their edu-
cation under the tutelage of Prof.
Boaz Siegel, who has been a faculty
member at Wayne State University
Law School since 1941 and since
1952 has held a full law professor-
ship, attest to the prominence of
their teacher as a candidate for the
Michigan Court of Appeals, newly
established by the new constitution.
Prof. Siegel's eminence stems
also from his experience as a
teacher of delinquent boys and the
mentally retarded and as an at-
tendance officer for the Detroit
Board of Education from 1936 to
1945. He has also been a teacher
of workers education since 1933.
Having lived here with his
family since 1925, Dr. Siegel has
been associated all his life with
the Labor Zionist movement,
following the tradition estab-
lished by his parents. His mother
was a Pioneer Women's Organi-
zation founder and his father
a pioneer in the LZO.
In a specially prepared state-
ment, Prof. Siegel pointed out that
the new court "should speed up
appeal cases." He explained the
new court, evaluating its purposes,
stating in part:
"The Court of Appeals is given
jurisdiction of all final decisions
from all lower courts in Michigan,
which includes circuit, recorders,
justice, police, municipal, and
probate courts. In this way, the
Court of Appeals will be the legal
net through which all appeals in

Charles Levin, a veteran Detroit
attorney, announced his candidacy
for the State Senate in the Sixth
District.
An attorney for 17 years, Levin,
38, is a senior partner in the law
firm of Levin, Levin, Garvett and
Dill. In addition to practicing law
in Michigan, he is licensed before
the United States Supreme Court,
the District of Columbia and New
York State.
Married and the father of three
children, Levin is a life-long resi-
dent of the 6th District. He pre-
sently resides at 18280 Fairway
Drive.
His father, Theodore Levin, is
Chief Judge of the Federal Dis-
trict Court in Detroit.
"The 6th District," Levin said,
"is fashioned out of parts of sev-
eral old districts, and represents
more than 270,000 persons."
"With a State Legislature that
spends $1.6 billions a year, these
270,000 people need able, progres-
sive representation. I do not think
they can receive it from the pre-
sent incumbent, nor from the other
candidates opposing me."
The 6th District comprises an
area bounded by W. 8 Mile Rd.
on the North; Livernois, Dexter
and Lawton on the West; the
Edsel Ford Expressway on the
South; Woodward Avenue and all
of Highland Park and the area
just south of Highland Park east
of Woodward, on the East.
"I will conduct a perso: - cam-
paign," said Levin, "I want to meet
people; talk to them on the street,
in stores and at their homes,
churches and clubs." Urban renew-
al, housing, unemployment, juven-
ile delinquency, real estate taxes
and care for the Aged are all quite
personal problems in the 6th Dis-
trict. And they are all problems
that will have to be dealt with by
EARL D. LEADER
the legislature. I offer my candid-
Earl D. Leader, a Detroit practic-
acy to bring a trained legal back-
ground to these problems and ing attorney for 39 years, is a can-
didate for state senator in the 7th
their solutions."
District at the Sept. 1 Primary, on
the Democratic ticket.
Mr. Leader is-married and has a
daughter. They reside at 19519
Cranbrook Dr.
He is a graduate of Detroit Cen-
tral High School and received his
law degree from the Detroit Col-
Citizens for a United Detroit, an lege of Law in 1925. He is a mem-
organization of representatives of ber of the State Bar of Michigan
all faiths, at a meeting held last and the Michigan Association of
week, inaugurated a drive to de- the Professions and has partici-
feat the proposed homeowners or- pated in many Jewish movements.
The 7th Senatorial District in-
dinance to be voted on at the Sept.
1 primary election and called Pro- cludes the northwest section from
Livernois west and from Fenkell
position 1 "a step backwards."
This proposition, the Citizens for north, to the city limits, and has a
a United Detroit charged, "seeks population of over 205,000.
to substitute license and bigotry
Mr. Leader stated that the vast
for responsible and moral be- amount of new law resulting from
the Michigan Constitutional Con-
havior."
Former under the chairmanship vention tmphasizes the importance
of Dean John Weaver of Cathedral of having an experienced attorney
Church of Saint Paul, with Mayor as State Senator. "Much legislation
Jerome P. Cavanagh as honorary will be needed to insure proper
chairman, Citizens for a United care and support for abandoned
Detroit includes Dr. Richard C. families which has created a great
Hertz and Irving Rubin as co- burden for the taxpayer and con-
chairmen and executive committee tributed to the breakdown of fam-
includes Mrs. Golda Krolik, Sidney ily ties," he stated. Badly needed
Shevitz, Stanley Winkelman, Rich- tax funds should be channeled for
ard Marks, Leonard Kasle and Bur- institutiones for our mentally ill,
wayward and neglected children.
ton I. Gordon.

Leader Candidate
for State Senate
in lth District

Call Homeowners
Proposition 'an
Insult to City'

PROF. BOAZ SIEGEL

A marked improvement has
been made in the new edition of
"The History of Judaism," the il-
luminating historical review on
solid plastic issued by Data Guide,
Inc. (154-01 Barclay, Flushing,
N.Y.).
Written by Dr. Jacob E. Neusn-
er, Dartmouth Semites professor,
this study begins with the story
of the Creation, goes through the
entire history of Israel down to
modern times and concludes with
explanations of the various
branches of Judaism in the pre-
sent era.
In the splendid analysis of his-
toric happenings, excellently con-
densed for rapid reading. Dr. Neu-
sner has packed into his effort
thousands of years of occurrences.
His review of cultural attainments
is among the markedly impressive
factors in this work.
Data Guide publishes interesting
series of references charts and
historic analysis of religious and
other material in plastics. Joseph
L. Leon is president of the publish-
ing firm.

sive Israeli land policy was stressed
here by Mendel Fisher, secretary
of the Jewish National Fund of
America, who is currently visiting
Israel. Such a polic y, he said,
should fundamentally pursue the
classical approach of the JNF.
Commenting on the current con-
troversy regarding public land sale
to private interests, Fisher said
that the JNF always considered
the acquisition of land not only a
redemption but also viewed land
ownership as a vital means for
planning economic development.
These objectives are unchanged,
he noted, and must continue to be
served. He felt the JNF was still
the major instrument for this.

the state of Michigan will have
to go before they may be heard by
A man does not sin if he per-
the Supreme Court.
sonally gains nothing thereby. —
Shebuoth 42.
`But it is quite certain that most
cases will never go beyond the
........••••• ■ •••fobootgi
Court f Appeals even though the
• •
• •
parties to the case may wish to

appeal the case further. The rea-


son for this is that only in this



way will the Supreme Court have

:
LIVERNOIS STORE
the number of cases which it han-
dles reduced. If the decisions of
the Court of Appeals become the
He that does evil to Heaven but
final decisions in most cases, then
IN YOUR HOME PLAN
: •
the Supreme Court can devote does no evil to men is an evil-doer •
itself to those cases which it that is not wicked.—Kiddushin 40. •

thinks presents important and new

I •
questions.
• Candids • Formals • •
• •
"It can therefore be seen that
• •

Movies
the Court of Appeals is extremely
ALL Your Photography


important to every citizen of this
PER WEEK
Done in a Distinctive

• •
state. Every person starting out
Way For Those


in a case, either as plaintiff or
• •
Special Occasions
GRINNELL'S

defendant, will have to assume that

By

19400 LIVERNOIS

• •
his final appeal will be to the new

Michigan Court of Appeals. After
• UN 3-6997—Ask for Mr. Rayner*


the Court of Appeals decides a
CALL MR. ROSEN 341-4141
14•••••••••••••••••••••er
case, the Michigan Supreme Court
will probably have to be asked
whether it will review the decision
Michigan's Newest & Most Luxurious Motel
of the Court of Appeals. If the
A HOME AWAY FROM HOME FOR YOUR
Supreme Court decides that it will
AAA.
BAR MITZVAH & WEDDING GUESTS . .
not review the Court of Appeals
decision, then that decision will
stand as final."
14380 WEST 8 MILE ROAD
While Prof. Siegel's candidacy is
Bet. Schaefer and Northwestern Hwy.
for a nonpartisan post, he al-
Conference Room • Suites • Banquet Room
ready has received the backing of
three Democratic districts, includ-
JO 4-5450
t.1 8-1822
ing his own, the 17th.
HARVEST HOUSE RESTAURANT ON PREMISES
He has been endorsed by the
Detroit Building Trades Council
and by the Wayne County AFT-
CIO Council.



GRINNELL'S

• •
• •
• ••
NEW PIANO • •



J. CLARKE

EMBASSY MOTEL

Family Mobilizes
to Back Faxon's
Senate Candidacy

The family of Jack Faxon, Demo-
cratic candidate for the nomination
from the 15th Legislative District
formed a family club to get their
cousin elected.
Headed by Mrs. Bernice Winston
of Stansbury, the family member-
ship includes the Harry Wein-
steins of Lesure, the Morris Pleas-
ons of Lauder, Julian and Mary
Winston, M or r y and Ann ie
Schwartz, the William Elfmans,
and Jack Faxon who is a cousin
to the candidate. With the help
of the relatives who are all active
in various Jewish organizations,
Jack Faxon has been able to get
off to a good start in his effort to
represent the new 15th District.
Faxon's only relative on his
mother's side in Detroit is his
aunt, Lillian Krimsky. His maternal
grandfather, Rabbi Yoyel (Joel)
Krimsky, was for many years the
spiritual leader of the Jewish com-
munity in Lansing. Other members
of his mother's family are pres-
ently rabbis in Dayton, Baltimore
and Miami. Faxon also points to
a large family in Israel where all
of his uncles, their families, and
his grandparents settled.
"This is the first time that Jack
has been running from a district
that includes most of the family,"
said Bernice Winston, "and we
hope to really give him all the
help we can."

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, August 7, 1964 25

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