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July 31, 1964 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1964-07-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,

Israeli Campers 'Play' at Science

Mark Twain
and the Jews

BY DAVID SCHWARTZ

(Copyright, 1964, JTA, Inf!.)

Science-minded teen-agers participate in the first Youth Science
Camp sponsored by the Weizmann Institute on its campus in Rehovoth.
Fifty boys and girls are taking part in the summer camp, all of them
chosen from among 500 applicants on the basis of their academic
achievements. The program includes the usual camp activities coupled
with four hours daily in the Weizmann laboratories, lectures and field
trips.



Announcements

Last Week's Winners of the

"RASKIN
BIG BABY BONUS"

MRS. CYRIL SERVETTER

(Twin sons)
and

MRS.

JACK GREENWALD

(9 lbs., 12 oz.)

Congratulations on the birth of
their children and we hope the
RASKIN PRODUCTS you received
helped make your first week at
home easier.

RASKIN FOOD CO.

July 25—To Mr. and Mrs. Harold
Wolfe (Avis Glass, formerly of
Chicago), 29490 Everett, South-
field, a son, David Alan.
* * *
July 24—To Mr. and Mrs. Mar-
tin I. Silverman (Ann Shapiro),
5216 W. Nine Mile, a daughter,
Debra Jean.
* * *
July 24—To Mr. and Mrs. Ber-
nard Malamud (Shirley Nosan-
chuk), 14511 Marlowe. Oak Park,
a son, Kenneth Stewart.
* * *
July 23—To Mr. and Mrs. Jack
Frank (Beverly Stein), 20200 Grey-
dale, a son, Benjamin Lawrence.
* * *
July 23—To Mr. and Mrs. Theo-
dore T. Pollack (Rhoda Kramer) of
Manhattan Ave., Oak Park, a son,
Frederick Lyle.
*
*
July 21—To Mr. and Mrs. Louis
A. Tarnopel (Helaine T. Burke),
17346 Greenfield, a son, Michael
Steven.
* * *
July 21 — To Mr. and Mrs.
Samuel Flam (Marilyn Music),
23235 Berkley, Oak Park, a daugh-
ter, Tammy Lynn.
* * *
July 21—To Mr. and Mrs. David
Spinner (Mildred Gordner of
Windsor), 23620 Kenosha, Oak
Park, a son, Jeffrey Alan.

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July 21—To Mr. and Mrs. Mel-
vyn Rubenfire (Diane Mellen),
15330 James, Oak Park, daugh-
ter. Karen Denise.
* * *
July 20 — To Mr. and Mrs.
Morris David Baker (Beverly
Franzblau), 19166 Appoline and
Route 1, Russel Woods, Tecumseh,
Ont., a son, Joshua Benjamin.
* * *
July 18—To Mr. and Mrs. Hy
Eizelman (Elaine Hershovitz) of
Freeland, a daughter, Karen
Beth.
* * *
July 16 — To Mr. and Mrs.
Richard Sisler (Sharon Anne
Biales), 16520 Schaefer, a daugh-
Tammy Lynne.
* * *
July 14—To Mr. and Mrs. Julian
R. Ettelson (Stephanie Glazer)
of Chicago, formerly of Detroit,
a son, Bruce Irwin.
* * *
June 25—To Mr. and Mrs.
Tommy Salmons (Ilene Ratner),
17514 Deering, Livonia, a son,
Steven Aaron.
* * *
June 23—To Mr. and Mrs. Philip
L. Baum (Lorraine Chudler), 28551
Sutherland, Southfield, a daughter,
Beth Leigh.

Talmudic Scholar
at Yeshiva II. Is
Cancer Researcher

Dr. Moses D. Tendler, professor
of biology at Yeshiva College, un-
dergraduate school of arts and
sciences for men at Yeshiva Uni-
versity, and lecturer in Talmud at
the university's Rabbi Isaac Ele-
hanan Theological Seminary, is
combining successful careers as a
rabbi, bacteriologist and teacher.
Dr. Tendler recently attained
worldwide recognition for his re-
search work on the development
of new antibiotics and anticancer
agents. At a meeting of the Ameri-
can Association for Cancer Re-
search, in Toronto, last winter, Dr.
Tendler, in association with Dr.
Samuel Korman of Montefiore
Hospital, Bronx, N.Y., announced
the discovery of a drug which they
called "Refuin.' They said that
early clinical trials with the experi-
mental anticancer drug have
shown encouraging results.
Dr. Tendler organized and was
the first spiritual leader of the
Great Neck Synagogue, the first
Orthodox synagogue on the North
Shore of Long Island.

Camp Walden Officers

A Southfield miss, Judy Garlock,
18440 Midway, was elected presi-
dent of Camp Walden, Cheboygan.
Other officers are Stewart Lach-
man of Birmingham, vice presi-
dent; Edward Tann of Detroit, sec
retary; and Louis Gunsberg, of
Huntington Woods, treasurer.

One of every three tourists go-
ing to Israel today, it is said, are
non-Jews and I gather many of
them return with happy impres-
sions. Mark Twain visited the Holy
Land many years ago and wrote
about it in "Innocents Abroad."
He didn't give it much of a recom-
mendation. It was before the days
of the Zionist movement.
On every hand, he wrote, "the
maimed. the half formed, the dis-
eased assail you. There is scarcely
a child without sore eyes . .. The
natives seem to know but one word
as they extend the hand—bak-
sheesh."
The Zionists have done much to
improve the land since that day.
The deprensing canvas was only
brightened when Mark Twain
paused to contemplate the past his-
tory of the land and the beauty of
the Bible which came forth from
its soil. "Where is to be found a
book like the Bible so gemmed
with beautiful passage s? Who
taught the ancient writers their
simplicity of language, their felici-
ty of expression, their pathos and
above all their faculty of sinking
themselves out of sight of the
readers and making the narrative
stand out alone and seeming to
tell itself? Shakespeare is always
present when one reads his work.
Macaulay is present when we fol-
low the march of his stately sen-
tences, but the Old Testament
writers are hidden from view."
In his early years, Mark Twain's
acquaintance with Jews was limi-
ted.
At school, there were two Jew-
ish boys named Levin in his class.
In his autobiography, he wrote,
"They carried me back to Egypt
and in imagination, I moved
among the Pharoahs and all the
shadowy celebrities of that age.
We had collective name for them.
We called them Twenty-two, Twice
Levin (eleven)—twenty-two."
Later he got to know more Jews
— over 15.000,000. "They say,"
said Mark Twain, "there are only
15.000,000 Jews in the world. I
know that many myself."
A Jew wrote Mark Twain asking
how it was that in his writings
there was no discourtesy against
Jews and also what he thought was
the solution to the Jewish problem.
Mark Twain replied that the
worst he could say against the
Jews was that they belonged to
the human race, which, he
thought, was damnable enough.
As to the solution, he thought
the Irish had shown the way to
solve their problem. There had
been a virulent agitation against
the Irish in America, but the
Irish had organized, united poli-
tically and now were in control
of many cities. Jews should do
likewise, become legislators and
policemen. If you are a police-
man, of course you don't have to
worry about anyone not liking
you. If he acts funny, just "pull
him in."
In time, Mark Twain got a Jew-
ish son-in-law. His daughter, Clara,
married the noted maestro of the
Detroit Philharmonic, Ossip Gabril-
owitch. They used to have argu-
ments, Mark Twain saying to his
son - in - law how intelligent the
Jews were and his son-in-law re-
plying that they were not as smart
as his father-in-law thought.
Who won the argument, I don't
know. Phillip Stomovitz, the well-
known Detroit Jewish editor who
knew the Gabrilowitches probably
could enlighten us on this score.
(David: I've told the story, but
in due time, it'll be told again.
—P.S.)

Michigan is probably the only
state. ever to have organized as a
state before being admitted to the
Union, having at the same time a
duly elected state governor and a
federal territorial governor.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, July 31, 1964
24

Detroiter Rhoda Zahavie Shames,
Musician, Artist and Poet, Authors
`Three Free,' Short Story Volume

Rhoda Zahavie Shames, as Miss
Zahavie, was known here for a
number of years as a popular
singer at many public functions.
A graduate of the Detroit Insti-
tute of Musical Arts, Mrs. Shames
participated in 'concerts, was soloist
for Temples Beth El and Israel in
Detroit and Temple Bnai Israel in
Monroe.
She appeared on the Ford Sun-
day Evening Hour and was a mem-
ber of important giwmw,mumm
choirs.
Later, major-
ing in art at
Wayne State Uni-
versity, she pro-
duced some are
works and exhib-
ited her canvas-
es.
In addition, she
wrote poetry and
her verses were Mrs. Shames
published in sev-eral periodicals.
Now she has turned to writing
stories and Exposition Press (386
Park S., NY 16) has just issued her
86-page collection, "Three Free
and Other Stories." Here she com-
bines her skills—in writing, music,
poetry, and adds to her narratives
a philosophic flavor.
As explained by the Detroiter-
turned-author, her stories reflect
a way of life, they mirror the
writer's experiences, they ex-
press attitudes resulting from an
association with people.
She was, as she states, motivated
by "impulse" in the writing of her
stories. In a foreword she ex-
presses the hope that "my im-
pulsive ramblings may impress,
project, and stir your soul." To at-
tain this goal, Mrs. Shames has in-
serted both in the foreword and in
her stories numerous of her verses.
It is evident that her stories
have a religious flavor, that she is
moved spiritually and that she
seeks to express a faith.
She is married to a Detroit
school teacher, Joshua Shames,
and he is not omitted from her

BERNARD H.

WINER

tales. He appears in the first and
title story, "Three Free."
Her Jewish feelings are told in
Hebrew expressions she quotes
in her tales, and there are
Biblical references, resorts to
Proverbs, Judges, Psalms and
other Scriptural works.
Told in the first person, th"
stories are, as indicated, the ex-
periences of a writer. A numb--
of such tales are included unde-
the single heading "The End an ,'
the Beginning" which includes 15
subtitled narratives.
The other tales in the book in
addition to "Three Free" are "Aug-
ust Moon," 'There Are No Angels
in Heaven Ascending," "Collars,"
"Time Shall Not Make Us Forget "
"Lonesome Komnetski," 'Reward
for Our Good Deeds Does Not
Come on This Earth" and "Torn
Between the Arts."

France Aids Refugees

More than $3,500,000 was spent
in France during 1963 on educa-
tional, cultural and religious facili-
ties for North African Jewish ref-
ugees in France, Charles H. Jor-
dan, Joint Distribution Committee
director-general, reported.

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