100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

July 31, 1964 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1964-07-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Alexander Friedman - Mathematician
Who 'Solved' Albert Einstein's Theory

The "conflict" between a physi-
cist and a mathematician over the
shape the world is in has kept
scientists going around in circles
for the past 40 years. The two
men; Albert Einstein and Alex-
ander Friedman.
Friedman, a Soviet mathemati-
cian, declared in 1922 that from
the general theory of relativity, it
follows that the universe is ex-
panding. Einstein discounted the
calculations by his fellow Jewish
scientist.
A year later, it is recounted in
the current issue of "USSR," a
magazine on Soviet life printed in
this country, Einstein withdraw his
criticism. "My objections were
founded on a calculation error ...
I consider the results obtained by
Mr. Freidman correct and final,"
Einstein wrote in a German
physics journal.
The article by Irina Radun-
skaya makes no mention of
Friedman's Jewish background.
It says only that he won the
Cross of St. George as an army
pilot in World War I, that he
was a top meteorologist and ma-
thematician. He hoped to com-
bine the two sciences with a
theory on scientific weather
forecasting.
A 1910 graduate of the Univer-
sity of St. Petersburg, Friedman
had a great future ahead of him.
But in 1925, on a vacation in the
Crimea, he drank a glass of pol-
luted water and died of typhus.
He was 37.
Physicists throughout the world
last year marked the 40th anniver-
sary of Friedman's solution of Ein-
stein's equations. Despite this,
meteorologists claim the mathema-
tical exercises that went into the

discovery were only a "diversion,"
for Friedman.
Friedman was, first and last, a
mathematician, Einstein believed
the world to be infinite in time,
but he lacked a stable solution for
his equations. Friedman, on the
other hand, considered the possi-
bility, in equations, that the world
either would go on expanding into
eternity or it would come to an
end.
Until quite recently no one was
able to define Friedman's findings,
the article notes. For 30 years
after. physicists reconciled them-
selves to the possibility of the end
of the world and there are over
15 hypothesis on the creation of
the world, based on his equations.
As far as the creation of the
world is concerned, USSR maga-
zine discounts the possibility that
God made it.

Glueck : Papyri Found
in Jordan May Outdo
the Dead Sea Scrolls

JERUSALEM (JTA) — Papyri
from the 4th Century BCE, dis-
covered in Jordan "may prove
more important to the study of
Jewish history than even the Dead
Sea Scrolls," according to Dr.
Nelson Glueck, who reported on
the find.
Dr. Glueck, president of the
Hebrew Union College Jewish In-
stitute of Religion, made the state-
ment in his review of the first
year's activities of the Biblical
Archaeological School in Jerusa-
lem, which, he said, was already
a world center for archaeological
research.
The papyri shed light on life in
Samaria under Persian rule.

LIVING FtEB:Rgyv

6

A Weekly Column for the Advanced



presented by

THE TARBUTH FOUNDATION FOR THE
ADVANCEMENT OF HEBREW CULTURE

and the

AMERICAN JEWISH PRESS ASSOCIATION

Editor: DR. SHLOMO KODESH

Easy conversations taken from everyday life in Israel — with typical
colloquialisms and proverbs!

IN THE DEPARTMENT STORE

Salesman: Yes please, Madam?
Customer: I want to buy something
for my husband. Something
special for his birthday.

s.
C.

You cannot argue about taste.
Do you have a nice gold wrist
watch for me? That will be a
nice surprise for my husband—
for his birthday ...

TORONTO (JTA) — The long-
established practice of barring
Jews from membership in the ex-
clusive Rideau Club in Ottawa will
be tested shortly when applications
from several prominent Ottawa
Jews are considered.
Three of the applicants are
Louis Rasminsky, Bank of Canada
governor; David Goldne, former
deputy minister of the Industry
Department; and Lawrence Frei-
man, head of a large department
store in Ottawa and former presi-
dent of the Zionist Organization
of Canada. Rasminsky's proposer
is Blair Fraser, Ottawa editor of
Maclean's magazine. Sponsoring
Golden is A. Davidson Dunton,
president of Carleton University.
Frieman has been proposed by
Royal Canadian Navy Commander
F. J. D. Pemberton.
The former method of voting
on applications for membership
in the historic club the black-
ball system—has been discarded.
A special committee now passes
or rejects applications. For this
reason, club members believe
that the old practice of barring
Jews will be ended.
Recently, Canadian Prime Min-
ister Pearson, speaking to an au-
dience in the U.S. deplored the
discriminatory policy of a club in
his city, naming the Rideau Club.
This speech by the prime minister,
no doubt, provoked this action by
the organiaztion.



Canadian Group Sees Rise in Israeli Imports

MONTREAL (JTA)—Canpal Is-
rael Trading Co., Ltd., increased
the volume of its imports from
Israel in 1963 for the ninth con-
secutive year, it was announced
here at the firm's annual meeting
by Barney Aaron, president of the
company.
Since its formation, he reported,
Canpal has granted loans and
credits to Israel totaling $13,247,-
396.
According to S. S. Albert, sec-
retary treasurer of Canpal, last
year's volume of imports from
Israel exceeded $1,000,000. For
the first time in Canpal's his-
tory, he said, the major portion
of Canpal's income, during 1963,
"was derived from the sale of
Israel merchandise on the Ca-
nadian market."
Up to the end of 1963, he re-
ported, Canpal has paid 25 divi-
dends, amounting to 56 per cent of
the par value of the eary preferred
shares.
The report by the officers
showed that Canpal's purchases on
behalf of Israel had come from
every part of Canada. These pur-
chases included salmon from the

Far West; meat and grains from
the Midwest; tractors and milk
powder from Ontario; aluminum
and asbestos from Quebec; and
lumber, fishmeal and potato seeds
from the Maritime Provinces.

350 Brazil Jews Settle
in Israel in 6 Months

RIO DE JANEIRO (JTA) — A
group of 29 Brazilian Jews sailed
from here for Israel, planning to
settle permanently in the Jewish
state. The 29, according to the
Brazilian Zionist Organization,
bring to 350 the number of Bra-
zilian Jews settling in Israel during
the first six months of this year,
equaling exactly the total number
of Jews from this country who set-
tled in Israel in 1963.

RUN SPARE TIME

Greeting Card-Gift Shop at home!
Show friends samples of new 1964
C h r i s t m a s, All-occasion greeting
cards, gifts! Take orders. Earn to
100% profit. No experience needed.
Try without cost! Special fund rais-
ing plans for organizations. Rush
name for samples on approval. Regal
Greetings, Dept. 21C Ferndale, Mich.

Classified ads get quick results!

r************************************************

it*

Congregation Bnai Jacob

Now accepting reservations for

HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES

LA Jews Hit Egypt's Use
of German Scientists; Ask
President Pressure Bonn

in our beautiful Synagogue

LOS ANGELES (JTA) — The
continuing use of German scien-
tists by the Egyptian government
was sharply criticized by the or-
ganized Jewish community of Los
Angeles. A letter addressed to
President Johnson by Dr. Max W.
Bay, president of the Jewish Fed-
eration-Council of Greater Los
Angeles was written on behalf of
more than 500 affiliated organiz-
ations representing nearly half a
million American Jews.
The protest letter asked that
President Johnson use his personal
prestige and the high office of the
President of the United States to
influence the Federal Republic
of Germany "to use all legal
means to prevent her citizens from
contributing to the war machine
of the United Arab Republic."

and for Auxiliary Services irt

THE DETROIT ARTILLERY ARMORY

BOTH BUILDINGS AIR CONDITIONED FOR COMFORT

SEATING COMMITTEE AT SYNAGOGUE

The Upper Michigan "Copper
Country" is the largest commer-
cial deposit of native copper in
the world, having yielded nearly
11 billion pounds in the past cen-
tury.
O

S. We have a nice shaving set.
C. My husband uses an electric
shaver.

S. Perhaps a nice tie?
C. No. He has a closetful of ties.
S. What do you think of a very
nice leather briefcase?
C. I bought him a briefcase last
year.
S If so, than perhaps a nice watch?
C. A watch for my husband? No.
But what did you say? A watch?
Not a bad idea. My husband does
not like this watch of mine.

Prominent Jews to Test
Membership Policy in
Exclusive Canada Club

3

SUNDAY 9-12 A.M. 4(
DAILY 7-9 P.M.
Morning & Evening Services Daily

20470 HUBBELL NEAR 8 MILE ROAD

tt*******

*******************fir

BETH YEHUDAH SCHOOLS TO HOLD
50th ANNIVERSARY DINNER OCT. 25th

:It 7 v:1

T

%.1 , ?. .5

?tat ? Itt:i .1 ?

T -

? ltt ; 1? V7;k5

rti =lit;

sc74;
r7Y.. 7. 2 liytvn

r;p:

iv_.vvj 1r

New Words

to use
last year

itJY ~ rl 1 vr l7

wrist-
watch
gold

nriip;

shaving set
(machine)
Neck-tie

Idiomatic Expressions

Something special .
What do you think of?
Not a bad idea

- 1141Dp

ryr? •
r1. 4W
a a 4 2

ariwn
• --
41P7r ro3

g7

Proverb

r.

You cannot argue
about taste.

14

Friday, July 31, 1964

MZinri`P p



no-1 Inn nyu 717

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Leon J. Simon (center) has been named
chairman of the Yeshivah Beth Yehudah
50th Anniversary Dinner, to be held Oct.
25th at Cobo Hall. Planning the dinner and
ticket sales are (standing, left to right): Ben-
jamin Poss, president of Yeshivah Alumni
Association; Mark Nolan, Dan L a v e n,
Yeshivah treasurer; Charles Feinberg, Sam
Hechtman, Rabbi Goldman, who has joined

the Yeshivah staff as a fund raiser; Isadore
R. Cohen, and Max Thomas. Seated, left to
right: Sam Dashow, Howard Finsilver, Leon
J. Simon, secretary of Yeshivah and dinner
chairman; Hillel Abrams, president of the
Yeshivah, and Judge Charles Kaufman. The
full dinner committee will meet for the first
time Monday, Aug. 3rd, at Simon's house.
Tickets are now available.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan