100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

July 24, 1964 - Image 31

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1964-07-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Anna Safran's Tireborn,' Novel About French Resistance

"The Fireborn," published by
Vantage Press (120 WW. 31st,
NY1), is Anna Safran's first
novel. The author has, however,
a number of other works to her
credit and she is not a new-
comer on the publishing arena
and her work are especially
known to Yiddish readers.
A native of Siedlec, Poland,
who came tc this country at the
age of 14 to join her uncle in
New York, Anne was a typical
education-seeking imm igr a nt
who worked by day to be able
to study at night, who married,
raised two children, helped her
husband in business.
She wrote plays and short
stories, and she turned to Yid-
dish to express her poetic feel-
ings, with the result that three
of her collected poetic works in
Yiddish were published in 1945,
1950 and 1960. Her poems also
appeared in anthologies of Eng-
lish poetry and her condemna-
tion of Nazism formed one of

the noteworthy poetic expres-
sions.
In "The Fireborn" she de-
scribes the underground move-
ment in France. It is a descrip-
tion of life in Paris, the battle
against Nazism, a resistance on
the part of a couple that emer-
ges out of the cauldron in a
spirit of love awaiting their
child to be born in freedom
after the defeat of the Nazis,
The Fireborn.

Tower of Technology
at N. Y. World's Fair

LAST FEW DAYS
THROUGH SUNDAY, JULY 26

35 Jewish Schools
in Small Ontario Cities

JACK

GING

PSYCHIATRIST ON
TV's "11th HOUR"

IN THE BEST AMERICAN
COMEDY EVER WRITTEN

Featured at the American-
Israel Pavilion in the New York
World's Fair is the "Tower of
Technology" exhibit of the
American Technion Society,
sponsor of the Technion-Israel.
The unique display depicts the
wide range of engineering sub-
jects taught and researched at
the Technion, and the impact of
technology on modern Israel.

"MR. ROBERTS"

Briton Has Different Angle
on Destruction of Sodom

Phone Reservations
Accepted Now

EL 3.3350

TIMES and PRICES

Tues., Wed., Thurs., 8:30 p.m.
Sat., 6:00; Sun., 7:30 p.m.
$3.90—$2.90—$1.90
Fri., 8:30; Sat., 9:30 p.m.
$4.40—$3.40—$2.40
Friday Matinee at 2 p.m.
All Seats $1.10—$1.69










TICKETS NOW AT:

Playhouse Drive-In Box Office
Grinnell's, Downtown
LaFond Cigars, Downtown
All Sears Stores
Marwill Book Store, Northland
Ross Music, Eastland
LaBelle's Books, Birmingham
Klein Travel, Windsor
Mail Orders
Promptly Filled

Make checks payable to North-
land Playhouse, Northland Cen-
ter, Southfield, Mich. Please
enclose self-addressed stamped
envelope.

NEXT WEEK

"MY FAIR
LADY"

COMING

KATHRYN CROSBY (Mrs. Bing)
in "SABRINA FAIR"—
Aug. 4-9
BARBARA BEL GEDDES 10
"Love and Marriage"
Aug. 11-16
°ABSENCE OF A CELLO"
Aug. 18-23
"SOUND OF MUSIC"
Aug. 25 — Aug. 30
JUNE ALLYSON in
THE MATING DANCE"
Sept. 1-6
JAYNE MANSFIELD in
"BUS STOP"—Sept. 8-13

AIR CONDITIONED

Free Paved Parking

NORTHLAND

PLAYHOUSE

In Northland Center, off
Greenfield, between 8.9 Mile

The heroine is an actress and
a dancer. The hero is her man-
ager. They are faced with the
horrors of Nazi oppression, the
insecurity of Jews, the attacks
on the French, the emergence
of the underground.
Mrs. Safran evinces a fine
understanding of the conditions
that existed in France under
Nazism. She understands hu-
man nature, the developing
likes and dislikes, the manner
in which a love can blossom
when two people are thrown
together under conflicting cir-
cumstances.
There is also evident in this
theme the affirmation of Juda-
ism by those who defy the
cruelties of the Hitler hordes.
With the description of the in-
humanity of the Gestapo there
also is linked the humaneness
of those banded together against
the tyraninical hordes.
Mrs. Safran displays skill as
a novelist and her first try at
story-writing promises continu-
ing successes.

Time Magazine notes that for
many centuries, interpreters of the
Old Testament have thought that
the wickedness for which God de-
stroyed Sodom with fire and brim-
stone was homosexuality.
According to Anglican historian
Hugh Ross Williamson in Britain's
Clergy Review, other sins led to
Sodom's destruction, such as idola-
try and refusal to aid the needy.
"The correct understanding of
Sodom," he says, "is of a proud,
self-satisfied, materialist society,
acting with callous inhospitality to
man and at the same time reject-
ing the true worhip of God."

Herzl On His People

Here and now a people is strug-
gling for its life, its honor and its
liberty. It is trying to escape from
its stifling surroundings into the
sunshine. There are three possible
outcomes of the present position of
the Jewish people: one is the dumb
toleration of abuse and misery; the
second is revolt, hostility against a
hostile society. Ours is the third
way: to raise ourselves to a higher
level of morality, to spread wel-
fare; to seek the path by which
social justice shall triumph. Just
as our beloved poet created songs
out of his pains, so shall we, out
of our sufferings, contribute to the
progress of humanity, which we
serve.
—From Ilerzl's Address to the
Third Zionist Congress.

The Michigan Department of
Health was the first state health
agency to distribute blood plasma
to hospitals and physicians for
civilian. use.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
31
Friday, July 24, 1964

SOMETHIN' SMITH
and the REDHEADS

Exciting Music, Song and Comedy Trio

BARCLAY SHAW

DON McCALL • LINDSAY SAPPHIRE DANCERS
JACK MADDEN AND HIS ORCHESTRA

AL SIEGEL'S
INTERNATIONALL
FAMOUS

DOUGALL RD
WINDSOR
WO 5.6877

MOTOR HOTEL

CASINO

Comfortably Air-Conditioned

BENEFIT PERFORMANCE SATURDAY, JULY 25, 8:30
CONGREGATION B'NAI DAVID

Call 444-1510 or 356-8210
for reservations, 9 a.m. 6 p.m.

See It

TORONTO (JTA) — There are
35 Jewish schools in the province
of Ontario outside of its capital
and largest city, Toronto, accord-
ing to figures released by the
educational department of the
Canadian Jewish Congress, cen-
tral region.
These serve 28 commuities,
though actually the latter figure
could be expanded if one in-
cluded smaller, one-to-four-family
communities, sometimes with in a
20-or 30-mile radius of the main
community.
In most cases these are con-
gregational schools, although in
the larger centers of Ottawa,
Hamilton and Windsor they in-.
elude community-based institu-
tions. The total number of classes
is 219 and the total number of
pupils is 2,569, of which 1,430 are
boys and 1,139 girls. The total
number of teachers employed is
165, of whom 75 are professional
teachers or rabbis and 90 are
volunteers.
The actual weekly tuition. time
in the afternoon schools in Ottawa
ranges from 3 to 71/2 hours (a
minimum recommendation by
Canadian Jewish Congress is 6
hours weekly). In Windsor the
Shaar Hashomayim and the Peretz
Shule have 15 hours and 9 1/2
hours of weekly tuition, re-
spectively.

Before Broadway

Xviro Nste(

ickner on'" the Roof

inikicithte

BooK by JOSEPH STEIN
(*Ad on StIc1vriAte4p!tm'S
storiss try
mol4by JERRY BOCK
Lyrics by SHEIDOH HARNICK

Sf eclat perena4;Del DtirreDid

tefRe T.cd.ct ryd Directed Ch orcoere

Pm)

d

JEROME R0313INS

Good Nelehba-.,Sam
I-las It Made,..
WithThe
1301clat
wo-Wo
Ian E

LAST
DAYS

THAT BM

LAFF•HOPPIN'
EVE-POPPIN s

PICTUREABOUT
WIFE-SWAPPIN)

COMING JULY 29

PETER SELLERS in
"A SHOT IN THE DARK"

Dee&cei.

e .!ee,
c'tS41*' m..kv
ot scova

,m 4:1?- s. o ‘k\N NI

t:•N :

:

\*Ak-a sk

Adults $1 to 6 p.m. (Except Sunday & Holidays)
Matinees Sat., Sun., Wed.

Detroit's
Most Modern,
Comfortable
Theatre

Free
Paved
Parking

UN 2-8100

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan