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July 03, 1964 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1964-07-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Fried?mlvs Celeb r r te
WSU Press Issues Efros' Ancient
50 Year's of Ma rri age Jewish. Philosophy'; Schaver Fund

Gave Financial Aid to Publication

MR. AND MRS. FRIEDMAN

Celebrating 50 years of married
life, Mr. and Mrs. Morris Fried-
man, 10774 Lincoln, Huntington
Woods, will be honored Sunday
with a party given by their chil-
dren, Mrs. Morris Lazaroff of St..
Louis, Mrs. Izzy Chaiken, Mrs.
Louis Cohen, Leo. Alfred and Mrs.
Leonard Lerner.
The Friedmans were married in
Detroit, July 4, 1914. Both were
born in Russia. Mr. Friedman is
Mill active with his sons in the
plumbing business. The couple
belongs 1 the Mezeritzer Organi-
zation and Odessa Society and are
members of Ahavas Achim Syna-
gogue. They have 16 grandchil-
dren.

Bonn's Believe It or Not

Adolf Hitler and Adolf Eichmann
could draw a pension if they were
alive today, Herr Bennemann, min-
ister of the interior, told the Land-
tag in Hanover. This was because
the existing law allowed former
Nazis the right to a pension if
they had held office on May 8,
1945, The London Times reported.

2

Its publication made possible by
the Morris and Emma Schaver
Publication Fund for Jewish
Studies, "Ancient Jewish Phil-
osophy—A Study in Metaphysics
and Ethics," by Dr. Israel I. Efros,
honorary president of Tel Aviv
University and a professor of
Dropsie College, Philadelphia, was
issued this week by Wayne State
University Press.
Originally published in Jerus-
alem, in Hebrew, in 1959, this vol-
ume is a study that has won wide
acclaim.
Dr. Efros starts out on the pre-
mise that "we must look to the
Bible for the beginnings of Jew-
ish philosophy."
He adds that there is struggle
between two opposite tendencies
in Jewish philosophy—one in the
form of a protest, "the Hebraic
protest against the materialistic
monism of the pagan environ-
ment," which proclaimed the ex-
istence of a higher world and "was
a tendency of Holiness," and the
counter-tendency "to establish con-
necting channels, and these repre-
sent Glory."
Prof. Efros declares that the
tension of Hebraic thought, "the
flutter between the extremes of
Holiness and Glory, between
deism and pantheism, is what
makes religion an experience,
what gives religion its pangs
and ,ecstasies."
These views are elaborated upon
in Dr. Efros' evaluation of Pro-
phetic philosophy, in his analysis
of Apocryphal thinking, of proph-
ecy and the Hagigrapha.
Special interest attaches to his
study of Essene philosophy and of

A Weekly Column for the Advanced

presented by

THE TARBUTH FOUNDATION FOR THE
ADVANCEMENT OF HEBREW CULTURE

and the

AMERICAN JEWISH PRESS ASSOCIATION

Editor: DR. SHLOMO KODESH

Easy conversations taken from everyday life in Israel — with typical
colloquialisms and proverbs!

WHAT'S GOING ON?

First Woman:

What's going on
across the street?
Second Woman: Apparently an
accident.

trj fj _ - .n •,.. m rt >r
..., mi.,: ,,, ;„ , 7 r-in , :ix
.1...”n
. . ntini .
2.,•,.
•-il I ■ , e .. .
nini,r, :rte v....; : , . 7. ,7)t .

Man: No moment without mishap!

1

61—

'oft

1. It's really dangerous to go out in
the street.

rti .nnA

•• 1.• ■

r -

171.;::
11=
:
-r-

:. ■

1m)
lel r IrlI

Vme Islam

im‘•••• ■ i•

• mt

2. These drivers! Every one thinks
the road belongs to him!
Nf. Drivers are not Saints, but
mostly its the fault of the
pedestrians.

II

:•

T

••• 4%0

.1 IrSYI

• ■•■■ • •11,• ■ ••••••••

• I

•i As,/ ine
• • — • •

the midst of traffic.

2. What should they do? Fly?

M. Not exactly fly. Let them wait!

.1”

1. It's true, there is a corner for
crossing.
2. Well, sometimes a man is in a
hurry.

..irtmrz

ra,;17,

ztv,

7
67
12 ' 7; '-' 1 `? I !"41P

• • •

s; :7

177 1 :':̀ 44%.

New Words

traffic

fly

oIt) . ; ?.

corner-
rprIrt
crossing
Idiomatic expressions

road
2,1 ;p
pedestrians 711 -1 7ifi
,•••

to cross

What's going on? (What's the noise)
apparently
it's a real danger (for one's life)
not exactly

NY Jewish Women
Spur Mayor to Keep
Needy Youth in School

Held in Windsor

MRS. MURRAY JOFFE

Mr. and Mrs. Murray Joffe left
on a Hawaiian honeymoon follow-
ing their recent marriage at Shaar
Hashomayim Synagogue, Windsor.
The bride is the former Lanis
Ann Hoffman, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Hoffman of Riverside,
Ont. The bridegroom's parents are
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Joffe of
Goyeau St., Windsor.
The new Mrs. Joffe wore a
full-length sheath of white silk
peau de peche, featuring a three-
paneled tier back embroidered in
Alencon lace and seed pearls. Her
bouffant veil of silk illusion was
secured by an open pillbox em-
broidered in lace and seed
pearls. She carried Cymbidium
orchids and ivy.
Karen Hoffman attended her
sister as maid of honor. Brides-
maids were Sylvia Pellman and
Mrs. Eliot Levine of Toronto, Bar-
bara Harrogate of Chatham and
Marilyn Topliffe of Detroit.
Best man was Sam Oistacher of
Detroit, brother-in-law of the bride-
groom. Ushers included Dr. Fred
Muroff of Brookline, Mass., Cecil
Hoffman, the bride's brother, of
Toronto and Windsorites Irving
Ferrer and Morris Prostak.
On their return, the couple will
live in Windsor.

Men's Clubs

Dingell Testifies
on Bill to Ease
Immigration Laws

It is time to abolish the national
origins system of choosing immi-
grants to the United States, Demo-
cratic Rep. John D. Dingell, of
Michigan, said in his testimony
on his immigration reform bill.
"This system of discrimination
was adopted 40 years ago, and al-
ways was arbitrary and undemo-
cratic," he said. "Today it is so
unrealistic that two-thirds of the
persons who do enter this coun-
try, come in under special pitch-
up laws which the Congress has
passed."
Congressman Dingell praised
the House of Representatives
subcommittee on immigration
for holding hearings on his bill
an on other immigration reform
bills.
The hearings are taking place
in response to urging from Presi-
dent Johnson, who wants reform
this session if he can get it.
Since 1948 Congress has en-
acted 12 special laws modifying
the basic "national origins" law.
Of the 2,900,000 immigrants admit-
ted since 1952, 1,800,000 came in
under these special laws. During
these years 668,000 openings from
favored countries were not filled,
while today 630,000 persons in
other countries have signed up
but cannotcome into the United
States.

New Cleveland School

CLEVELAND (JTA)—Construc-
tion has been started on a new
school building for the Cleveland
Hebrew Schools to house the Bu-
reau of Jewish Education commu-
nal school and the Ganon Gil
Nursery.

FOR THE BEST IN
MUSIC & ENTERTAINMENT

SAM EMMER

And His Orchestra

DI 1-1609

,_:-"+::*:<:.>:::_>:...y.•::<..x::::<*xxxiz:::<*.x:::K.7.
.:,. PLASTIC FURNITURE L,l N .
COVERS

MADE TO ORDER
CONG. BETH MOSES MEN'S if

,-,)
or READY MADE
CLUB announces its newly elected 0 . 1 .1
officers include Max Marshak, presi- ',,': CALL ANNA KARBAL
,_.,.;
dent; Isadore Bernstein and Jerry ■
LI 2-0874
Guttenberg, vice presidents; Julius
Schlussel and Sheldon Manson,
The True International Touch!
secretaries; and Bernard Winer,
Ishaib Magy, Max Wais and Sam
From LotictonEngla nd,
Skupsky, trustees.
* * *
CONG. GEMILUTH CHASSO-
end his music.
DIM MEN'S CLUB recently elected
the following officers: Menasche
Haar, president: Norbert Robert
and John Hurtig,. vice presidents;

ZA!4 GILBERT

A Jewish women's organization
was instrumental in persuading
New York City to keep elementary
schools open for deprived children
throughout the summer.
Now the New York City Affairs and Henry Wellner and Martin
Committee of the National Coun- Salomon, secretaries.
Want ads get quick results!
cil of Jewish Women is recruit-
ing volunteers, together with the
BERNARD H.
Urban League, to serve as teach-
Candid Photography
ers' aides in this historic first ex-
Bar Mitzvahs — Weddings
periment with all-year schooling
in New York's primary school
KE 1-8196
system.
New York City Mayor Robert F.
Wagner, in giving the program a
MR. & MRS. SAM HERSKOVIC
green light, announced he will al-
of
locate special city funds for it if
OAK
MANOR
KOSHER
CATERERS
necessary. It will cost about
8900 W. 7 MILE RD. (1 Bik. E. of Wyoming)
$100,000.
The New York Board of Educa-
Are leaving for Israel, and will
tion is opening the seven schools
be closed July 8th to July 23rd.
in slum neighborhoods this sum-
CALLS WILL BE TAKEN AT:
mer in a first-time effort to give
small children individual help in
LI 8-5863
or
863-2446
reading, writing and cultural en-
richment. Heretofore only high
schools have been open for sum-
EXPECTING OUT OF TOWN GUESTS
mer remedial work.
The volunteers will help teach-
FOR A WEDDING OR A BAR MITZVAH?
ers by serving as tutors, interpret-
ing the program to parents and
helping conduct trips to broaden
the horizons of the children. While
Is Conveniently Located at
classes will be much smaller than
usual, with a maximum of 20
20500 JAMES COUZENS
pupils to a teacher the program
(8 Mile & Greenfield—Across from Northland)
is based on individual assistance to
Call 342-3000 For the Finest Accommodations!
each pupil by the volunteers.
Dine at the SCOTCH & SIRLOIN RESTAURANT

cAL•UN.13065

WINER 0

1. The pedestrians? How come?

M. Because they cross the street in

M. Lady, it's better to be late in this
world, than to be early in the
next one.

:

the eschatological aspects of it.
Quoting Josephus, "The Essenes
are Jews by birth and love seems
to reign among them more than
among members of any other sect,"
Prof. Efros writes:
"What is the meaning here
of 'Jews by birth,' and how is
this connected with the love
that reigns among them? But
these expressions imply their
hostile estrangement from their
people balanced by a warmer at-
titude toward each other. Jo-
sephus himself seems to have
sympathy for this group, to
whose philosophy he devotes
much space."
There are important evaluations
here also of Tannaitic speculations
and of the world view of the
Amoraim. In his conclusion to the
first part of his study, Dr. Efros
explains: "Greek philosophy be-
gins with a quest for a single pri-
mordial element: water, air, or
fire, and is willing to leave the
rest to natural development. He-
braic thought leaves nothing to
development, but keeps the divine
being continuously at work until
the first Sabbatical stars appear
in the firmament and all is done."
He thereupon declares:
"Judaism is not a religion of
rest ... it is all tension . . . it
presents moral demands in which
there is an idealistic longing for
the impossible which is never-
theless a duty, as in the re-
ligious experience: Be ye holy,
for I am holy. It is a divine
morality imposed upon a hu-
man creature, t h e infinite
pressed into the finite."
The second part of his book is
devoted the philosophy of biblical
ethics, to the elements- of justice,
mercy, love and holiness which are
contributing factors in ethical con-
cepts.
The Messianic idea is evaluated
and the ethics of religion empha-
sized. "Stronger and clearer than
ever is the biblical voice calling
to our generation" is the conclud-
ing sentiment that emphasizes the
power of ethical teachings.
An appendix offers explanations
for eschatological terms and there
are extensive notes that add much
value to this meritorious work.

droffe-Hoffm an Rites

nisro

(111-1:1)

accident
collision
car
driver

Cranbrook House Motel

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, July 3, 1964
20

Airport Limousine Service Available

II
M

..V

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