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June 19, 1964 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1964-06-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Bureau Receives Queries of Non-Jews Nasser Stepped a Little Bit Harder on Toes of U.S.

The Jewish Information Bureau,
Inc. of New York announces that it
is now receiving an ever larger
number of inquiries about Jewish
community activities and affairs
from non-Jewish individuals and
organizations, and especially from
Christian organizations, it was re-
ported by the director of the Bur-
eau, Bernard G. Richards, to the
board of directors at a meeting at
bureau headquarters, 250 W. 57th
-Th -,Street, New York.
College students, from different
universities and dealing wth a va-
riety of subjects, have written for
assistance with data.
A student at Trinity Center, Hia-
watha, Calif., asked about the "in-
terpretation of word symbols in the
Bible."
A student in the Franciscan Or-

Ferry Service Started
for Israel and Turkey

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to the Jewish News)

IZMIR, Turkey—The Bilu, an
Israeli ferry boat, arrived at Izmir
Tuesday to inaugurate projected
Mediterranean ferry service be-
tween the two countries.
A large crowd, which included
Turkish cabinet ministers, the
governor and mayor of Izmir and
other top officials, welcomed the
ship, which brought a group of
Israeli officials, travel agents and
newsmen.
AI's Ihsan Gofush, the Turkish
minister for Tourism, told a recep-
tion that the arrival of the Israeli
boat signified an important tourist
event achieved by Israeli-Turkish
cooperation.
The reception was held on the
Bilu and was attended by a large
group of Turkish ministers, offici-
als and businessmen. The boat was
greeted by a band playing the
Israeli national anthem.
Talks got underway today be-
tween Israeli and Turkish tourist
officials on an agreement for regu-
lar ferryboat service between
Haifa and Izmir.

13

der, preparing for the Catholic
priesthood, asked for references in
Jewish history.
Rev. Dr. James A. Pike, Bishop
Coadjutor of the Diocese of Calif-
ornia, inquired about a statement
in an old time Jewish periodical.
Rev. Aloysius E. Bernhard of St.
Mary's Seminary, Baltimore, in-
quired about Hebrew translations
from Dante.
The bureau is a non-profit agency
which renders a free service, of in-
formation, to the public and has
been functioning for over 30 years.
It is supported by contributions
from individuals and organizatons
interested in maintaning such a ser-
vice.
Recently 20 leading national and
central Jewish organizations, issued
a statement endorsing this work
and pleading for more ample sup-
port for the Bureau.

Israel Chief Rabbi
Arrives in NY

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to the Jewish News)

NEW YORK — Israel's Chief
Rabbi Isser Yehuda Unterman ar-
rived here Monday night for a
two-week visit to this country dur-
ing which will officiate at the
wedding of his granddaughter
Elena Unterman of Brooklyn and
will address various Jewish groups.
Rabbi and Mrs. Unterman were
greeted at Kennedy International
Airport by some 100 Jewish re-
ligious leaders.
Rabbi .Unterman said on his ar-
rival that while in this country he
would take part in discussions aim-
ed at uniting various elements of
Orthodox congregations in the
United States.
(Wednesday night he addressed
a dinner in honor of Detroiter
Zvi Tomkiewicz sponsored by the
Religious Zionists of America
(Mizrachi-Hapoel Mizrachi) in New
York. The banquet was attended
by Detroiters Max and Phillip
Stollman. The latter, Detroit Miz-
rachi leader, addressed the gath-
ering.)

A Weekly Column for Beginners

presented by

THE TARBUTH FOUNDATION FOR THE
ADVANCEMENT OF HEBREW CULTURE

and the

AMERICAN JEWISH PRESS ASSOCIATION

2

Editor: DR. SHLOMO KODESH

Many people read our lesson.

Many women learn Hebrew from

the newspaper.

:NI1 V

We want to know (become

\

.11vt?f1 11K wet, msr m4v?..
M 4t272,
Anpv

acquainted) you.
Who are you? Who learns (m.) and
who learns (f.)?
Where do you live (xn.) and where
do you live (f.)?
How many people In your home
read Hebrew?

Imps

•M511t;

vit7

?m,N4

What do you think (m.) about our
lessons?

What do you think (f.) about all this.
Did you learn much, or little?
Is this easy, or difficult?
What was good and what not so
good?
Please write us a letter.
We are very happy to receive letters.
You can write in English.
Please! Thank you! Shalom!

TARBUTH FOUNDATION: 515 Park Ave., N. Y. 22, N. Y.

By JESSIE HALPERN

JTA Correspondent in Washington
(Copyright, 1964. Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, Inc.)

WASHINGTON—In a n a t-
tempt to pacify Egypt's ever-
hostile and brooding Colonel
Gamal Abdel Nasser, Phillips
Talbot, U. S. Assistant Secre-
tary of State for the Near East
and Southeast Asia, was sent to
Cairo recently.
While Talbot carried a mes-
sage to Colonel Nasser from
President Johnson, the initia-
tive for the trip obviously came
from the State Department.
From Cairo has been coming
pleas, as well as words of euph-
oria, uttered by American Am-
bassador John S. Badeau, who
had been trying hard to con-
vince the State Department that
Nasser was really a "nice guy,"
and that it was truly unfortun-
ate that the Arab leader was
being rewarded with unpleasant
United States speeches.
Actually, in light of the out-
come of last January's 13-state
Cairo summit conference, Nas-
ser had recently seemed like
much more of a "nice guy" than
the United States had been
prone to give him credit for
being. But, after all, he could
hardly have begun to make true
his aggression threats to Israel
until he had succeeded in ob-
taining Arab unity.
However, soon after the Cairo
summit had ended, Alexis John-
son, Deputy Assistant Secretary
of State, made his Arab-shaking
speech to let it be known the
U.S. in the interests of peace,
would tolerate neither Arab-
Arab aggression nor that of
Arab states against Israel — es-
sentially a reiteration of a well-
known U. S. position. Interest-
ingly, Johnson had been invit-
ed to talk by a private pro-
Arab group; and Arab diplo-
mats later commented privately
that the speech had nothing in
it. The general Arab outcry had
mererly been made because the
Johnson's speech immediately
followed t h e Cairo summit
Which had threatened action
against Israel's Jordan River ir-
rigation scheme.
Then, in New York, at the
Weizmann Institute dinner,
President Lyndon Johnson,
understanding the Jordan irri-
gation problems, issued an offer
to Israel for U. S. cooperation in
a desalination project. The
President's speech also stressed
American willingness for simi-
lar cooperation with all countr-
ies. The Arabs apparently turn-
ed a deaf ear to this offer and
continued with a barrage of
verbal attacks against the John-
son Administration as being
pro-Israel to the Arabs' detri-
ment.
Nasser began to thunder that
war with Israel was "inevit-
able." He also called for the
liquidation of American and
British Air Force bases in
Libya. This last incident, though
not of prime importance, cer-
tainly appears to be one of the
reason for Talbot's recent trip.
But the present Egyptian cry-
ing actually has also served as
a cover-up for Nasser's refusal
to withdraw his own forces
from Yemen. UN Secretary-
General U Thant had pointed
out in his last report that not

YOUR DICTIONARY FOR TODAY

you think (m.)
you think (f.)

easy
hard
or
we are glad
(happy)
to receive

address

man — men
woman — women
to know (become
acquainted
newspaper
you (m. p1.)
how many
(how much)?
of yours (m. pl.)

Plant Pathologist
Jacob Joseph Taubenhaus, a
Palestinian-born American plant
pathologist, was one of the pio-
neers in the field in this country
earlier this century. His major
contribution was in the treatment
of the diseases of the hollyhock.

OV7V)

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
13
Friday, June 19, 1964

only did Nasser not withdraw
any of his troops (as he had
promised the United States a
year ago), but in the last two
months Egyptian forces in Ye-
men were actually increased by
2,000.
Democratic Senator Ernest
Gruening of Alaska urged Pres-
ident Johnson to "ascertain all
the facts necessary . . . to make
the determination called for by
the anti-aggressor amendment
(to the Foreign Aid Act) with
respect to Egypt."
In a major Senate speech,
Sen. Gruening noted "Nasser's
constant threats against the very
existence of Israel and her
arms build up." The Alaskan
Senator also disclosed that until
the end of 1963 Egypt had re-
ceived $807,000,000 in U. S.
foreign assistance, diverting aid
to engage in aggression against
her neighbors; the money was
to have been used for improv-
ing the Egyptian economy.
Asked Senator Gruening to-
ward the end of his Senate-ap-
plauded speech, "How long will
the U. S. continue to finance

Nasser's trouble-making in the
Middle East? How long will the
U.S. accept the excuses of Nas-
ser's apologists? How long (will
the U. S.) accept Nasser's pro-
testations of neutrality when his
actions really play the Commun-
ist game?"
Many Washington observers
now realize that Nasser's apolo-
gists in both Washington and
Cario have so far had a rela-
ttively easy job of explaining
away to the American public
Egypt's actions in such remote
places as Yemen. But now that
Colonel Nasser had called dir-
ectly for the cancelation of Am-
erican military base agreements
in other countries, he has step-
ped just a bit too hard on
American toes.

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