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June 12, 1964 - Image 29

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1964-06-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Community Without Jewish Papers
Hampered in Their Identity, Jersey
Dinner Told by Jewish News Editor

J

/

.

JERSEY CITY, N. J.—Address-
ing a dinner arranged by repre-
sentatives of more than 100 Jew-
i s h organizations in Hudson
County, New Jersey, in honor of
Morris Janoff, editor and publish-
er of the Jersey City Jewish Stab-
dard, at the Jewish Center here,
Philip Slomovitz, editor of The
Detroit Jewish News, on Wednes-
day evening called upon American
Jewish communities to expand
their news coverage in order to
assure the contacts that are vit-
ally needed to keep Jews well in-
formed about their people every-
where.
Rejecting "the polemics of our
national leaders, their lip service
in dealing with Jewish cultural
problems," Slomovitz maintained
that American Jews are, in the
main, without contact with their
fellow Jews everywhere because
four-fifths of American Jewry are
not reached by a Jewish news-
paper.
Claiming for the existing Eng-
lish-Jewish press—for the nearly
50 weeklies published in as many
communities—a circulation of a
quarter of a million into as many
home s, Slomovitz charged that
another million Jewish homes in
this country have lost Jewish con-
tacts because they are not reached
journalistically. He stated:
"There are unfortunate blind
spots in American Jewry. We re-
sort to many shibboleth with prag-
matism. For instance, the conven-
tion of our Reform rabbis, to open
in Atlantic City on June 16, will
concern itself—as its leaders have
stated—primarily with the ques-
tion whether or not America's five
and a half million Jews are losing
their identity through assimila-
tion. We hear lots of talk about
Jewish culture and education and
how much money we need for
bigger and better buildings for
one thig or another. But no one,
during the entire debate over Jew-
ish survival and Jewish identity,
has yet raised the serious issue
created by the fact that the over-
whelming majority of American
Jews are without news about their
own people, without information
about their kinsmen either in this
country or anywhere else. When
there is a crisis and we are in the
limelight, our people become in-
formed in the daily press. Other-
wise they live in a vacuum."
He added: "Only when proper
status is given to the predominant
Jewish press, the English-Jewish,
providing for a reaching out of
the newspapers into every nook
and corner of this great land, will
we be able to hope for a truly
well-informed Jewish constituency
that will thereby be in a genuine
and wholesome position to claim
Jewish identity and survival."
Declaring that the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency is "the
bridge between communities,"
Slomovitz expressed appreciation
for the work of JTA and said
that without this Jewish news
agency, "we'd be totally lost.
"Without JTA," Slomovitz said,
"world Jewry would indeed be in
a jungle of misinformation."

The Family of the Late

LEON DUBROWSKY

Acknowledges with grateful ap-
preciation the many kind ex-
pressions of sympathy extended
by relatives and friends during
the family's recent bereave-
ment.

• •

*

We Wish to Announce That

LEON'S FISH MARKET

Located at

12152 DEXTER

Is now open to serve you in
the same courteous manner.

Janoff was acclaimed for his
services to the New Jersey com-
munities he is serving.
Capt. Herman Donchin was gen-
eral chairman of the testimonial
dinner which gave recognition to
Janoff's community services.
Guests who participated included
Boris Smolar, editor of the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, Nathan Ziprin,
editor of Seven Arts Feature Synd-
icate, and a number of local and
state leaders.
Numerous presentations were
made to Janoff by community rep-
resentatives, and he was given a
400-year old Torah case as a gift
from the community.
He received a message of greet-
ing from President Johnson and
was commended by Mayor Thomas
J. Whelan of Jersey City; by Meyer
Tesin, Jersey City corporation
counsel, who was toastmaster; and
by a number of other representa-
tives from Hudson County com-
munities.

Late Jewish Scientist
on New Indian Stamp

NEW DELHI (JTA) — The In-
dian postal services issued a new
stamp bearing the image of Dr.
Waldemar Mordecai Haffkine, a
Russian-born Jewish scientist who
lived in India during the latter
part of the 19th Century when he
was credited with successfully
curtailing the death rate among
the epidemic ridden population by
developing new inoculation tech-
niques.
He died in 1930 in Lausanne,
Switzerland.
After earning a doctorate in
biology at the University of
Odessa, Haffkine was sent to
India in 1893 where he was re-
markably successful in combat-
ting an epidemic of cholera and
later in sharply reducing the
mortality rate in an epidemic of
the Bubonic plague. He was ex-
tremely popular among the In-
dian population who referred to
him as the "White Magician."
After settling in France and
Switzerland in 1915, Dr. Haffkine
became an Orthodox Jew and de-
voted his later years to Jewish
scholarship. He left a large part
of his fortune to establish the
Haffkine Foundation, the income
of which was used to support East
European yeshivot.
The Indian postal services issu-
ed earlier stamps honoring Haff-
kine on the occasion of the hun-
dredth anniversary of his birth
and marking the 60th anniversary
of the founding of the Haffkine
Clinic in India.

$1-Million Fund Set Up
for Scandinavian Youth as
Thanks for Jews' Rescue

NEW YORK (JTA)—The estab-
lishment of a $1,000,000 scholar-
ship fund for Scandinavian stu-
dents in appreciation of the rescue
of most of Danish Jewry during
the Second World War, was an-
nounced here at a formal dinner
of the Phi Sigma Delta Founda-
tion, which will administer the
fund.
Prime Minister Jens Otto Krag
of Denmark was guest of honor at
the dinner, which was also attend-
ed by Governor Bengt Petri of
Sweden and Ambassador Knuth-
Winterfeldt of Denmark and Am-
bassador Hubert de Besehe of Swe-
den. The first 12 scholarships have
already been awarded for the
1964-65 academic year to Danish
students for study in the United
States and Denmark.
The Phi Sigma Delta Founda-
tion is composed of 48 chapters
with some 20,000 alumni across
the country. Victor Borge, pianist
and entertainer, is chairman of
the scholarship fund.

MUMFORD

I

S

S By JAY MASSERMAN

With the school year coming to
a close, all activities have reached
their final stages and plans for
next year are being formulated.
The Mumford Student Council has
elected the following officers for
the fall semester: Jim Strom, pres-
ident; Merrill Hoffman, vice presi-
dent; Sherry Ermin, coresponding
secretary; Cheryl Sideboard, re-
cording secretary, and Harry Win-
er, treasurer.
The cheer leaders for next year's
squad are: Pennie Omenke, Linda
Reisman, Sandy Shapiro, Barbara
Zollman, Linda Arons, Ada Sny-
der, Rita Ordin and Marilyn Sos-
nick. The s t u dent manager is
Susan Weissman.
At the recent athletic assembly
honoring Mumford's athletes and
teams, awards were presented to
Robert Hood, Barbara Miller and
Sue Ann Gershenson for outstand-
ing sportsmanship. The awards for
athlete of the year were presented
to Norman Levin, Alex Tischler
and Rosalyn Maddin.
Programming for next year will
be done in a new and unique way.
Student programs will be pro-
cessed by IBM computer machines
instead of by counselors. Also in
the planning stages for next se-
mester is a new type of enriched
curriculum to take the place of
the present science and arts ac-
celerated program.
Three counselors and a teacher
are retiring. They are: Miss Jean-
ette Caplan, Per c y Pray, Mrs.
Naomi Christy and Miss Mildred
Hodgen of the business education
department.
The 780 Seniors of the June
graduating class are reaching the
end of their high school careers in
a flurry of activities. At the honors
convocation to be held on Monday,
more seniors will be receiving
awards than ever before, justifying
the fact that this year's graduat-
ing class has exceeded all others
in scholastic achievements.
Citizenship awards presented to
Mumford's outstanding seniors in-
clude: Brenda Blumberg Nemer
Award, Elaine S c h r a u b and
Leonard Sahn; Roy F. Green
Award, Leslie Berg and Fred
Black; Detroit Police Department
Youth Award, Linda Rosenzweig
and Jay Masserman; DAR Good
Citizen Award, Barbara Desow;
Harvard Book Prize, Stanford
Bell; Danforth Book Award, David
Halpert and Donna Rae Hirt; and
Franklin and Marshall College
Book Award, Steven Schwartz.
Scholarships to various colleges
and universities were as follows:
University of Michigan, Martin
Abel, Sanford Bell, John Bookston,
Murray Ehrinpreis, Lenore Ferber,
Rochelle Kesler, D a vi d Klegon,
Ronald Lux, Jay Masserman, Stev-
en Parker, Charles Robinson,
Leonard Sahn, Steven Schwartz,
Thomas Spira, Howard White, Sue
Reed, and Karen Robbins; Wayne
State University, Herschel Free-
man, Beverly Klain, Renee Jen-
kins, James Mayer, Henry Bodzin,
John Bumford, Shirley Kunin,
Steven Lauter, Gail Pam, Rosalyn
Rives, Richard Weiner, Jay Mas-
serman, Mina Erlebacher, Susan
Gell, Sherry Kowal, Ronald Levey
and Elaine Schraub; Michigan
State University, Sanford Kaplan,
Lana Stein and Pearl Waxer; Al-
bion College. David Kerwin; Ben-
nington College, Leslie Berg; Uni-
versity of Pensylvania, Renee Jen-

kins; Spelman Colege, Marcia Har-
ris; Maryland Institute of Art,
Susan Grossman, and University of
Detroit, Joseph Moore.
Graduation will take place on
Wednesday in two shifts because
of the size of the class, to be fol-
lowed that evening by the senior
prom, "Some Enchanted Evening"
which will be held at the Fountain
Ballroom of Masonic Temple, with
Bob Durant and his orchestra and
The Classics supplying the music.
As the senior class bids fare-
well to Mumford, more than 85
per cent will continue their educa-
tion in various universities and
colleges throughout the country.
This is the last column for Jay
Masserman, who will enter the
pre-med program at Wayne State
University next fall on a scholar-
ship.

Pioneer in Laryngology
Louis Elsberg, a 19th century
American Jewish physician, was
a pioneer in the science of laryng-
ology. He introduced the use of the
laryngoscope into the United
States.

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THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, June 12, 1964
29

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