100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

May 22, 1964 - Image 39

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1964-05-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Strength
of Wanting

`The Tovarishch
Has Confessed'

By DAVID SCHWARTZ

By ISAAC LURIA

16th Century Sage, Excerpted in
Nahum N. Glatzer's "In Time of
Eternity," Published by Schocken.

Once, on the eve of the Sab-
bath, just before "the bride Sab-
bath was brought in," the mas-
ter went forth from the city of
Safed with his disciples. He
wore four white garments, the
upper cloak, the caftan, the
coat, and the trousers, thus to
receive the Sabbath. He began
chanting the psalm, "Ascribe
unto the Lord, 0 ye sons of
might," the song that ushers in
the Sabbath, and the "Psalm for
the Sabbath day," and "The
Lord reigneth," each with its
own beautiful melody.
And in the middle of his
singing, he spoke to his disci-
ples and said: "My friends, do
you want to go to Jerusalem
before the Sabbath, so that we
may celebrate it in Jerusalem?"
But Jerusalem is more than
twenty-five parasangs away
from Safed.
Then some of the disciples
replied, "We want to do this,"
but others answered, saying,
"Let us first go home and tell
our wives about it."
When they said, "Let us go
home first," the master shook
with a mighty tremor, struck
his hands together, and said:
"Woe to us that we were not
worthy to be redeemed. Had
you all answered me, as though
with one voice, and in great
gladness, that you wanted to
go, of a sudden all Israel would
have been redeemed. For the
hour of redemption was at
hand. But when you hesitated,
exile again became what it has
been, because of our great fail-
ings."

On March 13, 1852 "Uncle
Sam" became the symbol of the
United States for the first time
in a cartoon appearing in the
New York Lantern.

IN

Have you got that "nest egg" for
sudden emergencies . . for fu-
ture opportunities . . . for send-
ing the children to college? If
not, the time to start is now,
and there is no better way than
with U.S. savings bonds.

In Memoriam

In loving memory of Ida Pevin ,
who passed away May 21, 1942 (5
days in Sivan). Sadly missed by
husband and children.

The Family of the Late

EDITH
GREENBAUM

Asknowledges with grate-
ful appreciation the many
kind expressions of sym-
pathy extended by rela-
tives and friends during
the family's recent be-
reavement.

Wife Sylvia and Family
of the Late

DAVID L.
GOLDSM ITH

Acknowledges with grate-
ful appreciation the many
kind expressions of sym-
pathy extended by rela-
tives and friends during
the family's recent be-
reavement.

(Copyright, 1964, Jewish

The arrest and trial in Russia
of 23 men charged with engag-
ing in free' enterprise in manu-
facturing knitted goods for sale,
recalls an old story told about
Stalin and his watch. One day
after a conference with a dozen
of his leading executives, Stalin
found his watch gone. He im-
mediately contacted Beria, his
chief G.P.U. man and ordered
him to arrest all who had been
at the conference. Later Stalin
happened to pick up an old
sock on his desk and under it
was his watch. Stalin then again
called Beria and told him to
release them.
"Tovarishch, Commissar," re-
plied Beria, "It's too late—All
live confessed."
No reporters, says the New
York Times, were allowed at
the trial of the 23 men. Nine
were sentenced to death—ap-
parently all or most Jews, but
we know of course, there is no
anti-Semitism in Russia. The
Communists admit there is no
anti-Semitism there.
As regards private enterprise,
even Lenin allowed it under
what he called the NEP plan,
when he found the communist
system sagging. It does seem
that there is a very extensive
market for the articles made by
private enterprise in Russia.
Under the communist system,
there is a shortage of many
articles, such as wheat and
knitted goods. The Communist
system seems to excel in flying.
I don't think that is what
Marx meant when he spoke
about the workers rising.

Shoshana Freedman,
Known in Local Music
Circles, Dead at 49

Shoshana (Rose) Freedman,
music instructor wild choral direc-
tor for several groups in the com-
munity, died Monday at age 49.
Born in Rochester, N.Y., Mrs.
Freedman was a graduate of the
Eastman School of Music. She was
soprano soloist of the Temple
Israel quartet from 1947 to 1962
and music instructor of the Cong.
Beth Shalom confirmation class.
Mrs. Freedman, 13124 Wales,
Huntington Woods, was director of
the women's choral group at Cong.
Beth Aaron and music instructor
at Workmen's Circle Educational
Center, Farband and Sholem
Aleichem Institute.
She leaves her husband, Col.
Ralph Freedman, USAF ret., a
music instructor for the Detroit
Public Schools; a son, Steven; her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham
Cherkasky; a brother, Paul of De-
troit; and a sister, Mrs. Nat Fried-
man of Rochester.

William Schultz Dies
in LA at Age of 74

William Schultz, 74, formerly of
Detroit, died May 16 in Los An-
geles.
Mr. Schultz, who came to Detroit
from Poland as a child, owned
Bill's Grocery and Meat Market on
Linwood and Elmhurst. He was a
World War I veteran and a mem-
ber of many Jewish organizations.
Besides his wife, Mr. Schultz
leaves two daughters, Mrs. Morris
(Miriam) Rose of Los Angeles;
Mrs. Henry (Dorothy) Standish of
Detroit; four grandchildren and
one great-grandchild. A son, the
late Leon Schultz, died nine
months ago.

Progress in the time - worn
confidence games is just a new
slant on the same old angle.

Maurice Brown Dies
at 58; Ex-Detroiter
Was Phoenix Builder

Word has been received here of
the death of former Detroiter
Maurice D. Brown, Phoenix attor-
ney, builder and philanthropist. He
died May 4 at age 58.
He was past president of the
Phoenix Jewish Community Cen-
ter, the facility he designed and
helped finance, and was credited
with helping revamp Arizona's in-
surance laws, serving as an assist-
ant attorney general in the 1940s.
Mr. Brown, a native Detroiter,
graduated from the Detroit Col-
lege of Law at 18, the youngest
law graduate in Michigan his-
tory, and received his master's
degree in 1926 at the University
of Michigan. He was admitted
to the bar at 21.
He moved to Phoenix in 1931.
Thirty-one years later, at a testi-
monial dinner in his honor, Mr.
Brown was described by the
Phoenix mayor as one of "those
leading Phoenix into a great
future." He was a developer, cattle
rancher and builder of apartments
and luxury hotels.
He is survived by a brother, Ben
of Los Angeles; two sisters, Mrs.
Sarah Weisberg and Mrs. Kay
Goldberg, both of Phoenix; two
nephews and two nieces. An uncle,
David Brown, and a cousin, Shel-
don Trosch, are of the Detroit
area.

Ida Sterno Dies; Saved
Children from Nazis

BRUSSELS (JTA)—Ida Sterno,
a Jewish social worker well known
for her wartime activities in the
Jewish underground organization,
the Committee for Jewish Defense,
died here May 14 of a heart attack.
Using the alias, "Mademoiselle
Jeanne," Miss Sterno acted with
exceptional courage and devotion
in helping to save Jewish children
from deportation and placing them
with non-Jewish families or insti-
tutions.
She was arrested by the Gestapo
in 1944 and imprisoned for four
months at a camp in Malines, but
was saved from deportation with
the liberation of Belgium by the
Allies. Until her death, she had
been in communication with many
she had rescued.

Reuben LoPatin Dies;
Ex-Detroit Photographer

Former Detroit and Pontiac resi-
dent Reuben LoPatin died May 13
in Los Angeles at age 65.
Mr. LoPatin, born in Russia,
lived in Detroit 25 years and in
Pontiac 15 years. He operated three
photography studios until he
moved to California three years
ago. He was a member of the Elks,
Bnai Brith, Jewish War Veterans
and Temple Beth Beth Jacob,
Pontiac.
He leaves his wife, Sara; a
daughter, Belinda; and a sister,
Mrs. Myer Shifrin of Detroit.

Henry Jacob Succumbs

Henry Jacob, 19791 Coyle, died
Tuesday at the age of 65. An inde-
pendent- real estate broker for 30
years, Mr. Jacob was former presi-
dent of A. Jacob and Co., a local
produce firm.
He leaves his wife, Miriam; a
son, Thomas; a daughter, Mrs.
Gerald (Barbara) Meyers; one
brother and two grandchildren.

OBITUARIES

ALICE LENHOFF, 22010
Church, Oak Park, died May 16.
Survived by husband, Aaron;
father, Ruben Lipshitz; a son,
Saul; three daughters, Mrs. Mar-
vin (Elaine) Goldstein, Mrs. Allen
(Sandra) Gersh and Renee Joyce;
two brothers, two sisters and two
grandchildren.
* * *
DR. GEORGE W. BODT, 3037
Montery, died May 19. Survived
by one brother and one sister,
both of Israel, and one nephew,
David Naveh.
* * *
MORRIS PRESBERGER, 2325
Cass, died May 17. No survivors.
* * *
BECKY GOLDBERG, 11501 Pe-
toskey, died May 18. Survived by
three sons, Joseph of Downsview,
Ont., Bennie of Los Angeles, and
Charles; a daughter, Mrs. Maurice
(Sophie) Kingston; 12 grandchil-
dren and 15 great-grandchildren.
* * *
SANDOR HARTSTEIN, 16163
Indiana, died May 19. Survived by
a brother, Gene Hart.
*
*
BLANCHE M. LEVINSON, 19152
Coyle, died May 19. She leaves a
son, Dr. Stuart; a daughter, Mrs.
Herbert (Shirley) Goldstrom; one
brother, five sisters and five
grandchildren.
* * *
YETTA GERSHENOFF, 13297 S.
Norfolk, died May 13. She leaves
her husband, Saul; two sons, Sam
and Albert Leaderman; two daugh-
ters, Mrs. Sam (Rose) Rubens, Mrs.
Martin (Rose) Fels; a brother and
four grandchildren.
* * *
GEORGE RANER, 20042 Briar-
cliff, died May 14. He leaves two
brothers and three sisters, one of
whom, Sarah Ranen, is of Detroit.
* * *
GERALD SAMPSON. 22170
Church, Oak Park, died May 14.
He leaves his wife, Gladys; a
daughter, Gayle; parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Abe Sampson; and a brother.
* * *
FANNIE PANTZER, 17111
Second, died May 17. She leaves
two sons, George and Irving; a
daughter, Mrs. Bertram (Kate)
Kaatz; and eight grandchildren.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, May 22, 1964
39

Sid Wolfson's
MONUMENT CENTER, INC.

661 E. 8 MILE, FERNDALE
11/2 Blocks E. of Woodward
6 Blks. from 3 Jewish
Cemeteries on Woodward
LI 2-8266
JO 4-5557

MONUMENTS

See SAMUEL GORLICK

at the old and reliable

SHELDON GRANITE CO.

19800 Woodward Ave.
Detroit, Mich. — TO 8-1724

Serving The Jewish Community
For Over 60 Years

HARRIETT TEITEL of South
Haven died Sunday. Survived by
husband, Ben; a son, Robert; a
daughter, Mrs. Dave Mendelson;
and two sisters.
* *
MAX RUBENSTEIN, 13132 Win-
chester, Huntington Woods, died
May 19. Survived by two sons,
Charles and Philip; one brother,
eight grandchildren and one great-
grandchild.
* * *
ALEX GREENBERG, formerly
of Detroit died May 6 in Pitts-
burgh. Survived by his wife, Ellen;
a son, Jonathan; a daughter,
Lynne; mother, Kate Greenberg
of Indianapolis; one brother and
one sister. Interment Indianopolis.
* * *
JESSE W. JOHNSON, 14876
Santa Rosa, died May 21. Survived
by wife, Esther; a son, Samuel; a
daughter, Mrs. Joseph (Sarah)
Glickman; and three grandchil-
dren.

Lookstein's Son - in - Law Dies
David Schacter, of West Hamp-
stead, N. Y., who was a resident
here for two years before moving
back to New York, died last Fri-
day at the age of 40. He was the
son-in-law of Dr. and Mrs. Joseph
Lookstein. His wife and four chil-
dren survive him.

WE REMEMBER
1-1rx 71`7N

During the coming
week Yeshiva Beth
Yehuda will observe
the Yahrzeit of the
following deported
friends, with the
traditional Memorial
Prayers, recitation of
Kaddish and study-
ing of Mishnayes.

Hebrew Civil
Sivan May

Eliyohu M. Applebaum 13
Lena Klein
13

24
24

Isaac Ruffsky
Samuel Satovsky
Sarah R. Schwartzman
Isaac Yabek

14
14
14
14

25
25
25
25

15
15

26
26

Oscar I. Steel
16
Sholom Scott
16
Basha Faiga Katinsky 16
Jacob Franovitz
16
Rebecca Medow
16
Rachel Marwil
16
Kalman Shapiro
16

27
27
27
27
27
27
27

Sophia H. Goodman 17
Ben Benson
17
Fannie Pupko
17
Rab. Hyman Eisenberg 17
James Goldenberg
17
Bessie Harris
17

28
28
28
28
28
28

Chaya Golda Cohen 18
Leonard Steel
18
Mendel Landsberg
18

29
29
29

Joseph Miller
Aaron Levine
Isaac Brandt

30
30
30

Joseph Aptke
Jacob Shere

19
19
19

Yeshiva Beth Yehuda
12305 Dexter
WE 1-0203

Sidney A. Deitch

DETROIT MONUMENT WORKS

Serving Detroit's Jewish Community from the Same Location
for 30 Years . . . "Our Experience Is Your Guarantee"

2744 W. Davison at Lawton

TOwnsend 8-6923 I

(Between Linwood and Dexter)
Evenings: Dl 1-2276
Best Quality Granites—Personalized Designs Reasonably Priced

MONUMENTS B Y BERG A N D R BACH

Formerly•karl Berg Memorials And Manuel Urbach & Son

13405 CAPITAL NEAR COOLIDGE, OAK PARK

LI 4-2212
OPEN DAILY & SUNDAY 9 A.M. TO 5 P.M.. CLOSED SATURDAY

11a
:,

4,444,1

'‘.•;.•;$

Ira Kaufman Chapel, Inc.

DIRECTORS OF FUNERALS

18325 W. 9 MILE RD., IN SOUTHFIELD
loo ft. West of Northwestern Highway

Ira Kaufman - Herbert Kaufman

Elgin 1-5200

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan