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May 08, 1964 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1964-05-08

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Seeking to Turn the Clock Back

THE JEWISH NEWS

Incorporating The Detroit Jewish Chronicle commencing with issue of July 20, 1951

Member American Association of English—Jewish Newspapers, Michigan Press Association, National Editorial
Association.
Published every Friday by The Jewish News Publishing Co., 17100 West Seven Mile Road, Detroit 48235 Mich.,
VE 8-9364. Subscription $6 a year. Foreign $7.
Second Class Postage Paid at Detroit, Michigan

PHILIP SLOMOVITZ

Editor and Publisher

CARMI M. SLOMOVITZ

Business Manager

SIDNEY SHMARAK

Advertising Manager

CHARLOTTE RYAMS

City Editor

Sabbath Scriptural Selections

This Sabbath, the twenty-seventh day of Iyar, the following Scriptural selections will be read in
our synagogues.
Pentateuchal portion: Levit, 25:1-27:34. Pr ophetical portion: Jeremiah 16:19-17:14.

Licht Benshen, Friday, May 8, 7:20 p.m.

VOL. XLV. No. 11

Page Four

May 8, 1964

Allied Drive's Final Days for Action

In the few remaining days before the
formal closing of the Allied Jewish Campaign,
whose concluding dinner meeting has been
set for next Wednesday, a great many mem-
bers of our community who have not yet
been contacted will be charged with the duty
of asserting themselves. They must prove by
their actions in the current drive that they
are interested in our numerous cultural func-
tions, in our school systems, in the recrea-
•tional and social service agencies, in Sinai
Hospital and the Home for the Aged; and
they must indicate that they will not be
counted out in the roll call of those who are
supporting the overseas rescue efforts and
the settlement of escapees from lands of
oppression in Israel.
These are just a few of the causes which
depend upon our major fund-raising agency
for their sustenance. There are, in addition,
numerous national agencies whose upkeep
depends in some measure upon our gifts
towards the important movements in Ameri-
can Jewry. * * *
When the spokesmen for all of the func-
tioning local agencies met several months
ago to plan the distribution of available funds
from the current drive, it was established
that a minimum of $5,000,000 must be raised
if the urgent needs are to be met.
As we approach the end of the drive, it is
evident that a large sum still is to be secured
in available pledges, that several thousand
contributors are yet to be contacted, that a
sizable number of our people have not yet
responded to the call for action.
It is imperative that there should not be
a let-down and that the anticipated increased
response over last year's gifts should be fully
realized. This is not a drive for big givers
alone. It is a campaign that must enroll the
participation of every category of contribu-
tors, from the smallest to the very largest,

from the very young to those of all ages.
There are far too many who do not con-
tribute to the United Jewish Appeal national-
ly and to the Allied Jewish Campaign locally,
and in our own community it is not too late
even now, with only a few days remaining
before the end of this year's drive, to enroll
hundreds, perhaps thousands, who are able
to give and who either have not responded
or have not been reached by solicitors.
More than duty is involved: it is the
sense of honor of members of a great com-
munity that is at stake; and that honor must
be redeemed with courage and with speed.
Unless every potential giver is enrolled in
the drive, we will be found wanting by our
kinsmen everywhere and in the records of
our communal life.
*
*
It has been our boast that we are a very
good community. If that record is to be main-
tained, if we are to emerge as a group that
is determined to retain the unity that is
needed for survival and for the perpetuation
of the basic principles upon which a com-
munity is built, the coming few days must
bring forth a more generous response and
a truly voluntary demonstration of loyalty
towards the overseas needs represented in
the United Jewish Appeal—the Allied Jewish
Campaign's major beneficiary; in behalf of
Israel's leading educational institutions; in
support of the local and national causes which
are enrolled as participating members of our
community's enrolled agencies.
A real test is in the offing in the coming
few days. May the response prove that we are
the merciful children of a merciful people,
ever ready to provide for the needy and to
retain the honor of Jewry that goes with the
established Jewish traditions of lending se-
curity to the causes that spell humanitarian-
ism and spiritual sustenance.

Is There New Ganging-Up On Israel?

Recent events—the latest Nasser threats,
the damaging propaganda in the Jordan
pavilion at the World's Fair, the flood of mail
to American newspapers vilifying Jewry—
seem to indicate that the anti-Israel campaign
is being expanded.
They are dangerous evidences of an effort
to undermine Israel's existence. They are
part of the Nasser scheme to control the
entire area inhabited by all the Arab states
and of Israel, and they menace the peace and
the security not only of the Middle and Near
East but threaten, at the same time, world-
wide peaceful relations among all nations.
If this is part of the East-West struggle,
with Arabs constantly waving the threat to
the West that if they do not get all they want
from Western countries they will turn to the
East—as Hussein of Jordan actually did
during his recent visit in Washington—then
it is all the more deplorable that the Western
Powers are not taking a firmer stand in the
direction of averting a crisis. It is not enough
to utter verbal platitudes of assurance that
an assault on Israel will not be tolerated.
In the event of an attack on Israel, due to
its proximity to her neighbors, there can be
destruction before there is action. Then the
only consolation will be a rebuke from one
government or another—too late to avert a
calamity.
The discussions during the sessions of
the Council of Ministers of the Central
Treaty Organization indicated that all is
not well, that the military race in the
Middle East is menacing the peace of the
world, that firm steps must be taken to
avert a crisis, else the moderate East-West
conflicts that are limited to a cold war will
inevitably burst into a flaming hot war.
The accumulating evidence of emerging

troubles should prove to our Government and
to our allies that mere lip service is insuf-
ficient, that it is not enough to offer assur-
ances of protection to Israel, that there is
need for action and that the sooner there is
a repudiation of the war-threatening declara-
tions by Nasser and a demand for an end to
the arming of the Arab states by the Com-
munist bloc, the better for all mankind.
*
*
There is no doubt that the dangers are
mounting, that Israel is never totally secure
in an environment of saber-rattling. It is
equally certain that many non-Jews in this
country have been and are being misled into
believing the Arab propaganda. It is clear
that unless public opinion is mobilized to
counteract the destructive influences, Israel
will suffer and the prestige of Jewry every-
where will be harmed by the misinformation
about our interest in Israel's security.
The responsibility devolves upon Jewish
leadership to mobilize forces for clarification
of Israel's position, for the presentation of
the facts in the issues revolving around
the Middle East problems, for the establish-
ment of the best relations with all elements
involving leading to peaceful considerations.
It is necessary that the State Department
and the Executive Department of our Gov-
ernment should always be kept fully aware
of the honorable intentions of Israel and of
the Israelis' kinsmen. It is vital that laymen
should be as well fortified with information,
to be offered whenever there is an attack on
Israel and on Jewry, as the professionals.
There must be no let-down in our civic-
protective functions. There must be built up
a strong volunteer force of men and women
who will speak up whenever there is an at-
tack. The dangers are too evident to permit
continuing complacency.

Judaeo-Spanish Dialect

Recordings Perpetuate Ladino
Folk Songs, Ballads of Love

While Yiddish is losing its following and fewer people use
it as their language of conversation from year to year, it is still
a vibrant tongue for hundreds of thousands of Jews.
But another Jewish dialect, the Judaeo-Spanish Ladino,
either already is dead, except for a handful still using it, or is
disappearing so rapidly that it soon will be a forgotten tongue.
That is why we owe such a deep debt of gratitude to
Collectors Guild (507 5th Ave., NY17) for having produced the
recording "Ladino Folk Songs," thereby perpetuating the folk
songs and the love ballads of Spanish Jews for whom Ladino
was such an important medium of expression for several cen-
turies.
There is much charm in the selections in this recording,
which are sung with so much feeling by Raphael Yair Elnaday.
We are informed that from his eighth birthday Elnadav's
Yemenite parents encouraged him to develop his voice so that
he mastered hazanuth with the celebrated Sephardic hazan
Yaacov Levi, in addition to training for semicha—ordination for
the rabbinate. He studied voice and violin at the Conservatory
Arzi Israel in his native city of Jerusalem, and also studied with
Prof. Moshe Cordova with whom he • mastered 75 makams
(modes) of Turkish music. He emerged an expert in and an
authority of Sephardic, Yemenite and Turkish folk songs which
he has interpreted over the Israel air waves.
Elnadav became chief hazan of Ohel Moed, the largest
Tel Aviv Sephardic synagogue, in 1950. He became chief
rabbi of the Havana, Cuba, Sephardic synagogue in 1955. In
1959 he became chief hazan of Shaare Zion, the Brooklyn
Syrian congregation,
It is to this sweet singer's voice that we owe the assurance
that the songs of a dying tongue will not in themselves remain
dead but will be available for future generations and will enable
those who are tracing lost Jewish dialects to have a better histori-
cal idea of Ladino through the songs of the Judaeo-Spanish dialect.
In some of the melodies in "Ladino Folk Songs" it is easy
to detect Jewish traditional hymns and Biblical terms. There are
cradle and wedding songs, a Purim drinking song, charming love
ballads.
In its entirety, this record contains folk songs with impres-
sive musical incantations that will delight music lovers of all
faiths.
Elnadav was accompanied by the Salonika Trio. The musical
arrangements are by Richard J. Neumann. The recording was
produced by the husband-wife team, B. and H. Stambler.

Middle East Problems

Berger's 'Arab World Today

"The Arab World Today," by Morroe Berger, which was
published by Doubleday in 1962 and was then reviewed in these
columns, has been issued as a Doubleday Anchor paperback.
Berger shows that Zionism and the emergence of Israel
served to spur Arab nationalism and to create the unity that has
been lacking in Arab ranks.
"With the exacerbation of Arab-Jewish relations on the
Palestine question, Nazi propaganda flooded the Near East and
found a large audience willing to listen to it, and a few in-
fluential *Moslems willing to learn the technique. Since the
creation of the state of Israel in 1948, anti-Semitic propaganda
has not needed to be imported from Europe; 'Westernization'
has made the Near East self-sufficient in this as in some other
kind of production, though criticism of Israel and Zionism is of
course not in itself necessarily anti-Semitic."
Berger's book, evaluating the status of Arabism, has many
references to the position of Israel and the status among Arabs
of Zionism and Judaism.

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