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April 24, 1964 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1964-04-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Able Revelation
UN Yearbook Contains Basic Facts About
of Nazis in Hiding Israel's Participation in World Affairs
to the United Nations —1962," published by Columbia provided 25 experts under the ex-
in Moosdorf Novel on Admitted
May 11, 1949, Israel, with a ter- University Press (2960 B'way, panded program and seven in reg-

"Next Door," a novel by Johanna
Moosdorf, translated from the Ger-
man by Michael Glenny, published
by Knopf, has powerful relevance
to the hunt for the Nazi murderers
who have escaped justice and who
must be brought to face the courts
that are trying the murderers.
Johanna Moosdorf, who has held
editorial posts in Germany, author
of five other novels and of sev-
eral plays, was born in Leipzig,
Germany, in 1911 and studied at
Berlin's Humboldt University. She
experienced Nazi persecutions due
to her marriage to a Jew, Paul
Bernstein. Her novels are based
on many personal experiences.
In "Next Door," the title of
which in German was Nebenan,
she deals with the wife of a Nazi
who was given deadly injections
and was committed to an insane
asylum, her husband having aimed
at eliminating her. She survived
but those who sought her as a wit-
ness against her husband, who was
responsible for many murders, fail-
ed to gain her help.
Many interesting characters pass
in review here—including a Jew-
ish sufferer from Nazism who, hav-
ing recognized Dorothea's husband,
suffered a shock and died instantly.
But he had in the meantime ex-
posed the criminal who was pos-
ing under a different name.
The course of events led to
Dorothea's being shaken out of her
lethargy. Her husband fled. But
the point is well made: that the
criminals must be discovered and
brought to justice, that the crimes
must not be hushed up.
Johanna Moosdorf performed her
task of pointing an accusing finger
at the Nazi brutalities with great
skill.

Want ads get quick results!

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, April 24, 1964
14

ritory of 20,700 square kilometers ,
and an estimated population of
2,332,000 as of Dec. 31, 1962, now
occupies an important role in world
affairs.
"Yearbook of the United Nations

Adas Shalom
Marks Milstone

American Israel
Committee Plans .
Policy Conclave

Leaders of Adas Shalom Syna-
gogue among those to be honored
at the synagogue's mortgage re-
demption ceremonies 8 p.m.
Wednesday, are (from left) Mrs.
William Sklar, vice-president of
the Married Couples Club; Can-
tor Nicholas Fenakel and Rabbi
Jacob E. Segal, both of whom
have been with Adas Shalom
since well before the dedication
of the main sanctuary in 1952;
Mrs J. Stewart Linden, sister-
hood president; and Dr. Louis
Beresh, first vice president of
the men's club. Others to be
cited at the mortgage burning
will include Norman Allan, syna-
gogue president; Dr. Sidney I.
Sells, president of the Married
Couples Club; and Jack H. Kauf-
man, men's club president. Chair-
man of the celebration is Judge
Ira G. Kaufman, honorary presi-
dent.

A TASTE OF HEBREW

A Weekly Column for Beginners

5

presented by

THE TARBUTH FOUNDATION FOR THE
ADVANCEMENT OF HEBREW CULTURE

and the

AMERICAN JEWISH PRESS ASSOCIATION

Editor: DR. SHLOMO KODESH

Moshe: Shalom Yosef, how are you?
Yosef: Thank you, very well and
how are you?
M. Everything is all right. (in order)
Where are you going?
Y. I am going to eat

M. Where do you eat lunch
(noon-meal)

twlirl

•.

MAN
T.-

18'7 ."11.1p

rirri

11111`iii

main prnim

M, Where do you eat dinner?
(evening meal)

rort4 LP;it4

and sometimes in restaurant.

M. Is there a good restaurant on
this street?
Y. Yes, and whefe are you going
now?
M. I am going to eat, too.

Y. Very good.
M. We are going together.

m.,'nf

7:pi5tp rrtz
77it:,*tri

Y. I eat lunch in the restaurant

Y. I eat dinner sometimes at home

nr4
sm: 11 r;i

?znv.

”k5 srip
1 :st.=VP`.P1
•`1 7,i1 P;
tiv,II;r ar; 1,6)y.
zl. rr?
?rim
r1nt5 11;4',1

:‘,t2

tl‘pfim

is pronounced ch as in Chanukah

YOUR DICTIONARY FOR TODAY

street

in the street
this
there is
we

we are going (m)

together

sometimes

N.Y. 27), in cooperation with the
United Nations, contains the basic
facts regarding Israel's participa-
tion in numerous internationally-
governed functions.
Israel's delegation for that year
is listed, having been headed by
Golda Meir, Michael Comay, Gideon
Rafael, Abraham Darom, Shabtai
Rosenn and Ehud Avriel, assisted
by a number of alternates. There
is a listing also of a group of Israeli
observers at the UN Security Coun-
cil.
Of interest are the numerous
contributions that were made by
Israel towards the support of the
various UN agencies. For example,
in the operation of activities to-
wards economic development and
technical aid, Israel gave $361,808,

how are you?
everything is fine (In
order)
where? (where to?)
to eat
lunch (noon-meal)
restaurant
in the restaurant
supper (evening-meal)



More than 100 members of the
Senate and House will attend the
closing dinner of the American
Israel Public Affairs Committee's
10th anniversary policy conference
in Washington, May 4 at the May-
flower Hotel.
Rep. Thomas E. Morgan, chair-
man of the House Committee on
Foreign - Affairs, Sen. Hugh Scott
of Pennsylvania, Ambassador Avra-
ham Harman of Israel and Rabbi
Philip S. Bernstein of Rochester,
chairman of the AIPAC, will ad-
dress the dinner.
The American Israel Public Af-
fairs Committee, founded in 1954,
is a national committee of Ameri-
can Jews which supports day-to-
day action in Washington to
strengthen U.S. policy in the Near
East in order to promote an Arab-
Israel peace settlement.
The conference is expected to
urge stronger action by the United
States to counter Nasser's recently
repeated threats of a second war
against Israel, the growing military
might of the Arab states and the
diplomatic offensive launched by
the Arabs to isolate Israel in the
world community.
There will be two sessions open
to the public—the dinner on Mon-
day evening and a meeting on
Sunday evening, May 3.
Rabbi Morris Adler is the Michi-
gan member of the AIPAC'S execu-
tive committee. Among the mem-
bers of the national committee are
Tom Borman, Mrs. Dora B. Ehrlich,
Morris Lieberman, David Safran,
and Sidney M. Shevitz.

Histadrut Foundation
Nears $5,000,000 Mark

The American Histadrut Devel-
opment Foundation has reached a
total of $4,551,000 in long-term
commitments by American donors,
according to William H. Sylk, Phil-
adelphia businessman who is na-
tional chairman of the three-year-
old Foundation. These commit-
ments, in the form of wills, be-
quests, insurance policies, and
other assignments that assure
future cash income for a wide pro-
gram of health, vocational train-
ing, cultural and welfare institu-
tions in Israel, will enable Histad-
rut to plan an effective long-range
development of these services for
the present and future population
of the country. In 1964, the Foun-
dation seeks an additional $2,000,-
000 in commitments, accordinig to
Mr. Sylk, who succeeds Associate
Justice Arthur H. Goldberg as
Foundation head.
Among the larger bequests al-
ready registered is that of the late
Mr. and Mrs. Solomon Silberberg,
of Bayonne, N.J., who left $441,000
for a Histadrut medical center in
Israel. Samuel A. Fryer, the noted
Los Angeles chemist and philan-
thropist, has announced a bequest
of more than $200,000 while Ben
Paul Brasley, Pittsburgh attorney,
has subscribed $100,000 toward the
Histadrut Scholarship Fund.

ular activities, offered a total of
120 fellowships, recruited 38 ex-
perts and placed 112 Fellows.
Israelis participated in a UN
seminar of urban development in
Warsaw. At the same time, UN
advisers were assigned to Israel in
the field of social services, and
participated in the training of social
welfare personnel. There were a
number of fellowships for Israelis
in the social welfare services.
Israel's UNICEF commitment for
disease control is listed in the
amount of $69,000.
Other agencies, including World
Health Organization, received al-
lotments from Israel.
Israel's percentage scale of as-
sessment for the UN 1963 budget
was 0.15 amounting to $119,893.
Scores of other Israeli partici
pants in world affairs are noted
in this volume.
This Columbia U.-UN Yearbook
is an indispensable work for stu-
dents of world affairs. Those seek-
ing data about the world organiza-
tion must turn to this volume for
facts about international coopera-
tion in numerous areas, for per-
sonnel of the nations represented,
for documentary information, au-
thoritative charts and maps. It is
a must in the study of history and
for all libraries.

Washington U. Frats
to Be Responsible for
Eliminating Own Bias

WASHINGTON (JTA) — S t u -
dents at George Washington Uni-
versity here voted to make the
school's fraternities and sororities
responsible for eliminating mem-
bership discrimination. By a vote
of 1,025 to 917, the students ap-
proved a proposal drafted by the
school's interfraternity council to
require each fraternity and so-
rority to submit an annual affi-
davit of nondiscrimination.
In the same referendum, the stu-
dents rejected two proposals that
would have given the university .
administration the authority to
ban organizations whose national
charters contained r e s t r i c t i v e
clauses.

DON FROHMAN CHORUS
May 3rd—Detroit Institute of Arts

The CARIBE MOTEL

PROVIDES YOUR
OUT-OF-TOWN GUESTS
WITH . . .

CONVENIENT LOCATION
Woodward near 7 Mile Rd.
Minutes away from everything
LUXURIOUS ROOMS
• Phones • Air Conditioning
• Complete Kitchens
• Wall-to-Wall Carpeting
COMPLETE
ACCOMMODATIONS
AT NO EXTRA COST
• TV and Radio • Parking
• Continental Breakfast

BOOK SALE

PHONE
TO 8-2662

New and Used
APRIL 24-MAY 1
13550 Woodward

corner Grand, H.P.
Every Class—Non-Fiction, Fiction
Hard and Paperbacks
Children's and Adults

Proceeds to:
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

Moderate
Rates
Start at

$8.00

19630
Woodward

Near 7 Mile Road

YESHIVATH BETH YEHUDAH

Providing Torah Education to Detroit for Half

a Century, Invites Registrations for the School

Year Beginning September 1964 for the Fol-
lowing Departments:

THE NURSERY SCHOOL — CHILDREN AGES 31/2 -4 1 /2

The Kindergarten

For Children Who Will Become Five Years
of Age Before March 1965

The Day School — Elementary Department

Affording the Complete Educational Program;
Hebrew Studies Till Noon and Fully Accredited
Detroit and Southfield General Studies
Curriculum Till 4:00 p.m.

The Afternoon School

A Jewish Studies Program for Children Who
Attend Public Schools

Reasonable Tuition Rate

Scholarships Available When the Need Is Indicated

Bus Service Provided

Registrations Accepted at the

HEBREW ACADEMY OF OAK PARK, THE SUBURBAN
BRANCH Of YESHIVATH BETH YEHUDA

15400 W. 10 MILE RD.

LI 8-8020

and the

DEXTER CENTER

12305 DEXTER BLVD.

WE 1-0203

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