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March 06, 1964 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1964-03-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Recalls the Beginnings
of the Weizman:, Institute

By MRS. CHAIM WEIZMANN

Danny Raskin's Historical Society's Transfer
to Brandeis Protested; Group
LISTENING Mobilized to Preserve Movement

Mrs. Weizmann, widow of Dr. Chaim Weizmann. first President of
the State of Israel, here reminisces about the beginnings of the Sieff
Research Institute—the first unit of what has since become the world-
famous Weizmann Institute of Science. She wrote the article on the
occasion of the upcoming 30th anniversary of the Sieff Institute in
April of this year.

The first time I saw Rehovoth was in October or November
1919, during the very first visit I paid to what was then Palestine.
No distinct recollection remains in my mind of the village itself,
except an impression of sandy roads and wide uncultivated ex-
panses as my husband and I drove throu'h on the way to Gedera.
Had I then been told that we should both eventually take up
permanent residence in this sandy place, I am sure I would have
laughed the mere suggestion to scorn.
Years passed by and it was not until April 1933. thirteen-
and-a-half years later, that we came back to Rehovoth, this time
by deliberate design. The Jewish Agency's Agricultural Experi-
ment Station. which was directed by Dr. Isaac Wilkansky (later

Dr. and Mrs. Chaim Weizmann at the time of the inauguration
of the Sieff Institute, Rehovoth, Israel.

Volcani). had been transferred from Tel Aviv the previous sum-
mer to the heart of the citrus-groves near the Rehovoth railway-
station. My husband decided that it would be appropriate to erect
his dream of chemistry and biology research laboratories on an
adjoining site.
There were several factors that led to his decision. Firstly,
the proximately of the Experiment Station directed by his close
friend Dr. Wilkansky; secondly, his intention that the program
of research he was contemplating should be linked with the Sta-
-tion's work for the advancement of the country's agriculture;
thirdly, his deep emotional feeling for the associations with the
ancient site of Yavneh, not far away from Rehovoth. It was to
Yavneh that the center of Jewish learning and scholarship was
removed after the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 C.E.
And last but not least, there was his wish to create a scientific
refuge for the young and promising scientists recently expelled
from Germany.
Our return to Rehovoth was for the laying of the foundation
stone of the Daniel Sieff Research Institute on April 12, 1933.
It was a modest ceremony, yet an exhilarating one because of the
significance which it held for the future. I remember in particular
my husband's prophetic statement, "Palestine, a small country, can
only be brought to fructification by scientific research," which
proved itself in the fulfilment of the past 30 years.
As I sat there, I thought of Daniel Sieff, a charming, gifted
boy of 17, who was a great friend of my late son Michael. Daniel
had asked to come to Israel to study biology and Hebrew because
he was too young to go to Cambridge. When Mr. and Mrs. Sieff
wanted to commemorate him, my husband suggested that the best
memorial would be an institute of research in his name, and this
idea was promptly accepted. The project was then taken up by
the family as a whole.
A year later we returned to dedicate the new Daniel Sieff
Research Institute, on April 3, 1934.
Yet, fascinated though I was by the achievement of the first
stage. I must confess that I could not help having mingled feel-
ings and being worried.
I was deeply concerned by the prospect of moving away
from London—something I could hardly have foreseen on my
first visit to Palestine in 1919!—and leaving there my two sons,
my home, my friends, my entire life for almost 30 years past,
and of coming to the sandy little village of Rehovoth of all places
in the world, instead of Jerusalem. But the prospect had to be
faced and accepted; and so it was.
From time to time my husband and I returned in the ensuing
years until our own home was built and made ready for our oc-
cupancy in 1937. The living quarters which we inhabited during
these sojourns varied. One time we had a three-room bungalow
with an attic which belonged to the American poetess Jessie
Sampter. Later there were two rooms in the old Club-House of the
Sieff Institute.
As for the subsequent stages, they are a matter of history.

Britain Remains Opposed to Genocide Pact Ratification
LONDON, (JTA) — British member of Parliament and Jew-
Foreign Secretary R. A. Butler ish leader. Sir Barnett had ask-
declared that the British gov ed whether, in view of the new
ernment did not intend to re- evidence disclosed in current
consider an earlier decision Nazi war crimes trials of the
against approval of the United genocide policy of Hitler's re-
Nations pact against genocide. gime, the British Government
The foreign secretary dis- would reconsider its decision
closed this in reply to an in- against adhering to the conven-
quiry from Sir Barnett Janner, Lion against mass murder.

-

HENNY YOUNGMAN, laugh-
master of the quick quips, fin-
ishes up at the Roostertail to-
morrow night after a successful
two-week stint with songstress
Margaret Whiting .. . As usual,
television continues to be the
big news for Henny . .. He has
done eight Johnny Carson shows
in the past few months, has
signed for four Jackie Gleason
shows and is currently talking
to the producers of "Hollywood
Palace," the new Saturday night
hit . . . This is in addition to
his full night club schedule and
the continuous plugging of his
first book, "How Do You Like
Me So Far?" . . When he's
"on" as they say, Henny has
the audience in the palm of his
hand . . . They'll laugh just
because he says it . . . and
Henny's expert comic delivery
can put a joke across where
others hardly get a snicker .. .
It takes a real pro like Henny
to tell the one about the sloppy-
looking, unshaven gent lumber-
ing up to the registration desk
of a big hotel, demanding the
best suite available, and with
a great flourish, signing his
check-in card with a big "X."
. . . As an after-thought, he
pulled the card back from the
clerk and added another "X"
. . . "This one," he explained
"stands for doctor of philoso-
phy." . . . If the audience is
with him, and Henny has a
knack of telling within a few
minutes before the mike, he can
get away with almost anything
. . . Aside from his fast one-
liners, another Henny Young-
man laugh-getter starts right
out with "There's a suspicious-
looking character in Room 716."
the hotel manager where I'm
staying told the house detec-
tive. "Better check on him
pretty carefully" .. . When the
house dick returned the man-
ager inquired, "Find any of our
towels in his suitcase?" . . .
"No," admitted the detective,
"but I found the chambermaid
in his grip."

*

* *

BEST BET of the Weekend
. . . Purim Party, Sunday, by
Knights of Pythias, Detroit
Lodge 44, at Castle Hall, 15787
Wyoming . .. Open to the pub-
lic . . . Dancing, refreshments,
prizes and choosing of a Queen
Esther.
* * *

AFTER MANY YEARS of
hard work, dedication and sin-
cere devotion to a cause she
fully believes in, Helen Rosen-
berg, founder and past presi-
dent of the City of Hope Can-
cer Fighters, has been reward-
ed by being named to the na-
tional board of directors . . .
Lil Kozloff, current president
of the Cancer Fighters, has
been appointed expansion chair-
Man for Michigan.
* * *
SPRING FROLIC by Clinton-
Frost Junior High School, March
14, at Robert Frost school in
Oak Park, puts a challenge that
students, teachers and parents
can have a good time together
. . . Two bands, one student
and one adult is on the agenda
. . . Students must be accom-
panied by parent or parents.
* *
SITE HAS BEEN changed to
Cong. Bnai David for 26th an-
nual donor luncheon of Fannie
Gluck Chapter, Mizrachi Wom-
en, May 5 . . . Gloria Radner
is donor chairman.

A Committee for the Pre-
servation of the Integrity of the
American Jewish Historical So-
ciety was formed here by lead-
ers of the society, fellowing dis-
agreement over announced plans
to move the society's operations
and headquarters from New
York City to the campus of
Brandeis University in Waltham,
Mass.
The committee is headed by
Dr. Salo W. Baron, former pres-
ident of the society, chairman;
Judge Edgar J. Nathan, Jr., vice-
president of the society, and
Prof. Abraham A. Neuman, vice-
president of the society and
president of Dropsie College of
Philadelphia, co-chairmen.
The committee was formed in
opposition to the announced
transfer of the society to Bran-
deis by its president, Dr. Abram
Kanof, two weeks ago. Dr. Kanof
stated in a press release that
the "decision to relocate was un-
animous." Only 15 members out
of 43 were present when the
matter was discussed Feb. 2 at
Brandeis University.
Prior to that meeting, a num-
ber of council members who
protested against holding the
meeting at Brandeis University
had been formally assured by
President Kanof that "no final
decisions" would be made at the
Feb. 2 meeting. The member-
ship of the society had already
voted 675 to 459 against a move
to Brandeis in a November re-
ferendum.
T h e new committee will
launch an educational campaign
among the membership to pre-
vent the adoption of constitu-
tional amendments proposed at
the Brandeis meeting, which, ac-
cording to the committee, "are
clearly designed to disfranchise
the membership of the society

I

and permanently hand over its
controls to a self-perpetuating
oligarchy."
• A major contention of the
committee is that the transfer
to Waltham, Mass., is contrary
to the intent of the late Dr. Lee
M. Friedman, former president
of the Society, who had left it
a $1,500,000 legacy. The will
stipulates that the legacy be
given to the society only "on
the express condition that it
shall be an independent organ-
igation."

Charge Toronto Officers
With Misconduct for
Arrest of N.Y. Rabbi

TORONTO (JTA) — Four of
eight Metropolitan Toronto po-
lice officers, found by a royal
commission to have arrested a
New York rabbi illegally in 1962,
have been charged with conduct
unbecoming an officer.
Metro chairman William Allen
said at a meeting of Metro coun-
cil the disciplinary action had
to await the outcome of civil ac-
tion, which Rabbi Norbert Lei-
ner brought against the police-
men.
A royal commission conducted
by Justice Dalton Lells into the
circumstances of Rabbi Leiner's
arrest on Jan. 26, 1962, found
the arresting officers subjected
the rabbi to foul and abusive lan-
guage.
It was determined that ser-
geant of detectives Alvin
Sproule struck the rabbi in the
face twice without justification.

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NORTHWOOD INN

NOW SERVING

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Every Sunday Morning-10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Adults $2.35—Children $1.65

Also

Special Sunday Dinner

$265

from 2 p.m.

Our Famous Northwood Inn Relish Tray

(Served With All Dinners)

CHOICE OF: SOUP DU JOUR, ICED TOMATO JUICE, FROSTED
FRESH FRUIT JUICE.
ENTREES:
• ROAST PRIME ROUND OF BEEF au Jus,
$2.65
with Creamy Whipped Potatoes
• ROAST YOUNG PHILADELPHIA CAPON with
2.63
Country Gravy and Creamy Whipped Potatoes
• CORNED BEEF AND CABBAGE with
2.65
Horseradish Sauce and Parsley Boiled Potato
• ROAST LONG ISLAND DUCKLING, Savory Dressing and
Giblet Gravy with Creamy Whipped Potatoes or
2.65
Sweet Potato.
• FRESHLY GROUND CHOPPED SIRLOIN with
2.65
Mushroom Gravy and Creamy Whipped Potatoes
• GOLDEN FRIED TENDERSWEET CLAMS and BABY
LOBSTER TAILS, Drawn Butter, Tartar Sauce and
2.65
French Fried Potatoes
FRESH VEGETABLE DU JOUR
CHOICE OF: CHEF'S TOSSED GREEN SALAD BOWL OR HEAD
LETTUCE AND TOMATO WITH 1000 ISLAND DRESSING.
COFFEE, TEA OR MILK

Children's Portions Available at $1.50 Each

Other Menu Items Available

/

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NORTHWOOD INN can handle from 20 to 500 people in our
own Banquet Rooms with ample parking available.
SWEET SIXTEEN PARTIES, SHOWERS,
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We also do Outside Catering to your Home-Office or Plant

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Remember . • . Tues.-Thurs. Are Bountiful Buffet
6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Nights

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