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February 07, 1964 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1964-02-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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SZO to Hold Hebrew
Language Conclave

Countrywide Tributes Paid to Memory of Averbach-Meyers
Judge Charles C. Simons; Noted Jurist Engagement Told
Sy na go gu e and Detroit Community Leader

JUDGE CHARLES C. SIMONS

Countrywide tributes poured
in this week from national or-
ganizations, distinguished jur-
ists and community leaders, in
memory of Judge Charles C.
Simons, who died Sunday at
Monroe General Hospital, at
the age of 87.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday at Temple Beth El.
Judge Simons had been ill
for a number of months.
At his retirement in 1959 he
was chief judge of the 6th U.S.
Court of Appeals, Cincinnati.
Born in Detroit, May 21, 1876,
on Madison Ave., Judge Simons
was educated in the Detroit
public schools, received his B.A.
and LL.B. degrees from the
University of Michigan in 1898
and 1900, and his alma mater
awarded him an honorary doc-
torate.
He was the youngest man
to be elected to the Michigan
State Senate in 1903. One of
Michigan's best known ora-
tors, he soon became a leader
in Republican Party affairs
and he gained national fame
for his sponsorship, 60 years
ago, of the first Direct State
Primary Law. At that time it
was viewed as a revolutionary
step.
He was Wayne County circuit
commissioner from 1905 to
1906. He was a member of the
Michigan State Constitutional
Convention in 1908. In 1916 he
was a Republican presidential
elector-at-large. He was a di-
rector of the Detroit Board of
Commerce in 1918.
President Warren G. Hard-
ing appointed him to the U.
S. District Court in 1923, and
in 1929 he was elevated by
President Herbert Hoover to
the U.S. Circuit Court of Ap-
peals, the highest court in the
land next to the U.S. Sup-
reme Court.
Judge Simons traced his
speaking ability to his college
days, having won the Northern
Oratorical League contest - as
the U. of M. representative in
1899.
Active in many causes, a
leader in local, state and Fed-
eral Bar Associations, Judge
Simons devoted himself for a
number of years to congrega-
tional affairs, as a leader in
Temple Beth El, the Union of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions and Hebrew Union Col-
lege. In 1941 he was president
of the biennial council of the
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations.
In 1946 he was so disturbed
by the actions of the anti-Zion-
ist (now pro-Arab and anti-
Israel) Council for Judaism
that he made this statement to
The Jewish News:
"I would have the Council
for Judaism re-evaluate the
logic and re-examine the ef-
fect of the impact of a purely
subjective concept upon a
harrassed and homeless peo-
ple whose tragically realistic
experiences deny it. If this

be naivete, make the most of
it."
He wrote this in the days
when there was no Israel but
merely a "harrassed and home-
less people" whom a group of
frightened Jews were harrass-
ing further, perhaps even more
brutally, than the anti-Semites.
Judge Simons expressed his re-
buke out of his sense of fair
play and his contempt for in-
justice.
This is what had motivated
his activities—in behalf of Al-
lied Jewish Campaigns, in sup-
port of religious concepts, as a
leader in and worker for hu-
manitarian causes.
In 1948, on the occasion of
Judge Simons' 25th anniversary
on the federal bench, the late
Judge Ernest A. O'Brien wrote
a glowing tribute to him in a
special article in The Jewish
News. He paid honor to Judge
Simons' "Lincolnesque clarity"
and stated that "simplicity of
his rulings leave no doubt as
to the genius of my eminent
friend."
The fact that the Michigan
Patent Law Association, the
State Bar of Michigan and the
Detroit Bar Association combin-
ed to honor Judge Simons, with
a birthday dinner, was an in-
dication of the esteem in which
he was held by all faiths.
A Purely Commentary col-
umn in The Jewish News of

May 18, 1956, in honor of Judge
Simons' 80th birthday, was in-
serted in the Congressional
Record by Congresswoman Mar-
tha Griffiths.
Judge Simons had written a
number of feature articles for
The Jewish News. On his 75th
birthday, the tribute to him in
The Jewish News was written
by the late Judge Frank A.
Picard.
Judge Simons was the son of
immigrant parents. His father,
David W. Simons, was elected
to the first nine-man City Coun-
cil of Detroit in 1918 and was
president of Cong. S h a a r e y
Zedek. He survived his three
brothers and his sister, all of
whom were well known here in
community circles and in busi-
ness. His brother Seymour be-
came nationally famous as a
musician.
Judge Simons' wife Lillian
died three years ago. They had
no children. They were known
for their deep attachment and
were always together at all
community and congregational
functions.
Tribute to the memory of
Judge Simons was paid in a
resolution adopted by the Michi-
gan State Senate Tuesday. Fed-
eral courts were closed for the
funeral. Also, at the annual
Jewish Welfare Federation din-
ner Tuesday evening, guests
stood in his memory.

Zager-Stone Lodge Honors Edwards

To help encourage Hebrew
studies, the Student Zionist Or-
ganization will hold a Hebrew-
language seminar, Feb. 14 to
16, at the South Branch Hotel,
Sounth Branch, N.J.
Announcements, in eluding
those of meal times; panel dis-
cussions, lectures and study
groups will be entirely in Heb-
rew.
Dr. Gershon Winer, dean and
associate professor of education
of the Jewish Teachers Semin-
ary, will lecture on "Social
Values in the Jewish Commun-
ity in the Diaspora." Asael Ben-
David, representative of the
Youth and Hechalutz Depart-
ment of the Jewish Agency in
Jerusalem, will speak on "Social
MISS BARBARA AVERBACH Values in Modern Israel."
Miss Manja Posnansky is
The engagement of Barbara chairman of the seminar.
Susan Averbach to Kenneth
Sanford Meyers is announced
MUSIC I ENTERTAINMENT !
by her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Lloyd Averbach of Roselawn
Ave. The prospective bride-
groom is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Ben Meyers of Ohio Ave.
and his orchestra
Miss Averbach attended Ohio
UN 3-6501
State University and is now at-
If No Answer Call DI 1-6847
tending Wayne State Univer-
sity. Her fiance is a graduate of
Wayne State University and fK..F.M.€!7:::+.:KK...Kg...Y7`4 4 ■FVW67-1 ?;
PLASTIC FURNITURE 1$1
now attends the Chicago Col-
COVERS
lege of Osteopathy.
tt l
MADE TO ORDER
An Aug. 23 wedding is
or READY MADE
planned.

SAMMY
WOOLF

F%. CALL ANNA KARBAL

LI 2-0874
k..7-7;a77.:M;X*2-; :;.7•.,.

Youth to Do Show
`For the Fun of It'

The Detroit Jewish Youth
Council will present "For The
Fun Of It," a variety show, 8
to 11 p.m. Feb. 15 at the Jewish
Center.
All the performers are local
teens who were selected by two
professional judges. Tickets may
be purchased at the door.

• CANDIDS
• BLACK & WHITE

The True International Touch!

Loadoetnaland.

ZANillBERT
music.
...dills

cut.U4.13065

LI 8-1116
LI 8-2266

• MOVIES
• COLOR

MARGOLIS & SKORE

KOSHER MEATS & POULTRY

Complete Selection of Kosher Frozen Foods

Judge George Edwards, named recently to the U. S. Cir-
cuit Court of Appeals, was presented with an American flag
by members of Zager-Stone Lodge, Bnai Brith. Making the
presentation in his offices at the Federal Building are (from
left) Leo Polk, financial secretary; Irving Lipson, president;
Judge Edwards; Julius Berkowitz; and Nathaniel Goldstick,
former corporation counsel of the City of Detroit. Judge
Edwards has been an honorary member of Zager-Stone Lodge
for 15 years.

Center Abandons Cigarette Sales,
Recognizing Hazards of Smoking

In a policy statement adopt-
ed last week, the board of di-
rectors of the Jewish Com-
munity Center took note of the
harmful health effects of cig-
afette smoking and instructed
its staff to take concrete
measures to point up the harz-
ard and to particularly dis-
courage the smoking habit
among young people served by
the agency.

The text of the statement is as
follows:
Since its inception the Detroit
Jewish Community Center has main-
tained a department of Health and
Physical Education for the purpose
of offering service and program de-
signed to preserve and enhance the
health and physical well being of its
clientele.
Consistent with this objective, the
Board and administration of the
Center has taken cognizance of the
recent government reports which
seem to indicate beyond a reasonable
doubt the deleterious effects of
cigarette smoking and has instructed
staff to institute the following policy
and procedures in order to discourage
this harmful habit:
I. Smoking by minors within Center
operated facilities or while partici-
pating in activities under Center
sponsorship is to be prohibited and
all reasonable measures to enforce
this regulation are to be taken.
IL Appropriate programmatic
means are to be employed to inter-
pret to groups meeting in or spon-

sored by the Center the negative
effects of smoking on health.
III. Because of the particular con-
cern of this agency with the health
and well being of young people and
our understanding of the influence of
adult leaders on youth behaviors,
Center staff is to refrain from smok-
ing while on duty or in contact with
clientelle.
Iv. In order to further dramatize
the agency's conviction that smoking
is not in the best interest of those
whom we serve, cigarettes shall not
be offered for sale anywhere within
Center facilities.

Ground Breaking
Set Today for
Boris Joffe School

Ground will be broken for the
new Boris M. Joffe Elementary
School, 2200 Ewald Circle, 3:45
p.m. today.
The school is named for the
late executive director of the
Jewish Community Council of
Metropolitan Detroit, who died
May 28, 1960.
There will be a kindergarten
unit, self-contained primary
activity rooms plus staff and ad-
ministrative facilities.
Completion is scheduled for
September.

13514 W. 7 MILE ROAD-

Between Hartwell & Schaefer

DI 1-2840

WE DELIVER

AMPLE FREE PARKING IN REAR

GET THE BEST — PAY LESS AT

*

REISMAN'S POULTRY MARKET

13400 W. 7 MILE RD. cor. Snowden

FREE DELIVERY

DI 1-45 2 5

AMPLE PARKING

KOSHER KILLED, FRESH DAILY

YOUNG HEN TURKEYS
FANCY FRYERS
FRESH
SNAPPER or FRESH' FLOUNDER

Lb.

35C
29`

Lb.

49`

Lb.

TEL AVIV KOSHER DILL PICKLES . . . Q 29`
CARMEL KOSHER GELATIN . . . . 3 Pkgs. 25`
8COuR 39`
DAISY BRAND WHIPPED BUTTER .
MANISCHEWITZ CHICKEN SOUPS 5 Cans 99c
Ma Cohen's Pickled Schmaltz Herring t 89c
Chicago Kosher Salami or Bologna . Lb. 75`
Delicious Tasty fresh Smoked Fish Lb. 59c
Cello I fie
Pkg. 111111.
FRESH CARROTS

Above Specials Good Feb. 7 thru Feb. 13

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