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December 13, 1963 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1963-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, December 13, 1963—THE DETROIT JEWISH NEW S- 14

Arad's First Birthday Celebration
to Mark Israel Bond Progress

7

The celebration of the first anniversary of the establish-
ment of Arad this month will spotlight the imnortance of the
Israel Bond program in the development of the Negev. In many
communities, November will be observed as "Arad Month" in
honor of the new desert town's birthday. Shown above, an
official of the administration in Arad (top) greets one of the
first families to come to the town, and (below) a view of the
new community. Arad's population, which is now 600, is expected
to reach 6,000 within a year, and will eventually be 30,000
according to present plans for its expansion.

Smith and Kennedy

By DAVID SCHWARTZ

(Copyright, 1963, JTA, Inc.)

AI Smith was a man of great
popular • appeal, a wonderful
stump speaker and he had a dis-
tinguished record as Governor
of New York, but the idea of
a Catholic in the White House
was apparently too much for
many to take. Herbert Lehman
who was one of the people
closest to Smith told how on
one occasion, just before Smith
took to speak in Oklahoma,
Smith said to him: "Would you
like to listen to the speech I
will make in Oklahoma?"
"I certainly would," replied
Lehman.
Smith rehearsed his speech
in private before Lehman.
Lehman was electrified. "You
make that speech and you are
a sure winner."
When the time came, Lehman
had all his friends about the
radio, promising them a rare
treat, but when the Smith
speech came over the air, it
was a dreary affair, not the
same speech at all. Smith later
explained that the bigots had
burned crosses in his face and
he had encountered so much
hostility that he just couldn't
deliver the speech he had in-
tended.
John F. Kennedy finally suc-
ceeded in breaking down a
good deal of this prejudice,
sufficient to be elected to the
Presidency. Kennedy was • of
course a different type in many
ways. Smith had almost no
formal education. A young

woman once asked him if he
had read a certain book. "My
dear," Smith replied, "the only
book I ever read was 'The Life
and Battles of John L. Sulli-
van.' " Kennedy, on the other
hand, seemed to have read
about everything. He was ex-
ceptionally well read.

Holland Gives Evidence
to Austria On Nazi
Who Deported Jews
AMSTERDAM, (JTA)—Dutch
officials reported that a Vienna
court has decided to keep Erich
Rajakovic in prison pending his
trial next spring after the Dutch
Criminal Investigation Depart-
ment submitted irrefutable new
evidence linking the former
Nazi with the deportation of
110,000 Dutch Jews to Ausch-
witz.
The CID evidence was trans-
mitted to the State War Docu-
mentation Center which in turn
sent it to Vienna officials.
Rajakovic, charged by the Dutch
with having been a key aide of
the late Adolf Eichmann, was
identified as a former Nazi by
a Milan newspaper last April
and fled with his wife to Switz-
erland. Ordered to leave by
Swiss police, he went to Vienna,
where he was arrested.

Wells' ‘Janowska Road' Another Iraq Demands
in Series of German Indictments
Jews Register
In "The Janowska Road," disprove anti-Zionist propaganda
published by Macmillan, Leon that emanated from Russia and Within 10 Days

Wells tells the moving story of
his struggle for survival under
the Nazis. It began when he was
14, when the Germans marched
into Poland. He witnessed death
and destruction, he was subject-
ed to horrible humiliations in
the Janowska• concentration
camp, he was in forced labor in
the Death Brigade, he escaped
twice, finally, after many dan-
gerous escapades, being among
the fortunate to be liberated.
He is now an American citi-
zen, having come here after pur-
suing preliminary studies in
Germany. It was when the Rus-
sians drove out the Nazis that
he joined the Soviet forces, later
escaping to the American Zone.
He mastered mathematics and
physics, received his Ph.D. de-
gree in Germany, came to the
U. S. to pursue his graduate
studies at Lehigh University and
I now is director of research for
Panopix Research, Inc.
Simultaneous with his pub-
lication of "The Janowska
Road," Dr. Wells gained fame
with his invention of an audio-
visual record player that could
put color film libraries of en-
tertainment and instructional
material within the reach of
the average American home.
Not long ago his "Arc 120"
split-screen device was intro-
duced to the film industry
which already had, in 1961,
given him the International
Motion Picture Award for out-
standing scientific service to
this field. He is also a recog-
nized authority in the grow-
ing field of hydrodynamics and
has published two papers on
this subject with the U. S.
Naval Research Office.
Such, briefly, is the story of
the man who, in "The Janowska
Road," tells of struggle and des-
pair, heroism in the face of
danger and escape from huma•i-
ty's most despicable foe.
Even under the Russians,
Leon had difficulties. Red tape
stood in the way of his being
recognized as an escapee from
the Nazis. His strains and
stresses therefore were un-
bounded, until he found haven
with American aid.
His sufferings under the
Nazis, his experiences which
brought him face to face with
the most brutal of the Hitlerites,
makes his account an invaluable
supplement to the records ex-
posing the German crimes.
There is an interesting com-
ment hi Leon Wells' book
which has some relation to
the debate whether J ew i s h
sufferers from Nazism resisted
enough. We read in "The Jan-
owska Road": "Our Jewish
community leaders — all I
came in contact with—were of
high moral standards, men
who went • bravely to their
deaths in front of their people
. . . Perhaps the only regret-
table thing is that because of
their high moral standards
and moral values, they didn't
know how to organize a phy-
sical resistance. . Physical
power may have been too re-
pulsive t o them."
Wells comments about him-
self and his fellow sufferers that
"none of us was interested in
political ideologies, only in a
Jewish State." He describes the
formation among the concentra-
tion camp inmates of an 'Ichud
(united) Zionist group whiCh
was short-lived.
In relation to possibilities of
resettlement after the rescue,
he states: "If at this time we
had been free to emigrate to
Palestine, there would have been
no problem; practically all of
us would have gone there, even
those who had close relatives in
the Americas. But Palestine was
still closed to us then. The only
possibility was to get to a friend-
ly country; there one could wait
until he could go to the place
of his desire."
The author takes occasion to

_

The University of Michigan
was the • first university in the
U.S: to make an effort to pre-
serve state Land university arch-
ives, with the establishment of
the Michigan Historical Collec-
tions in 1935.

MRS. IDA WOLK and Daughter MRS. ABRAHAM
(FRANCES) BERESH; Sister, MRS. IRVING
(PAULINE) STEPAK, and Brother, DAVID
WOLK, and Four Grandchildren—

FAMILY OF THE LATE

WILLIAM WOLK

Who passed away suddenly November 2, acknowledge
with grateful appreciation the many kind expressions
of sympathy extended by relatives and friends during
the family's recent bereavement.

to point to discriminations that
were practiced by the Soviet
N.K.V.D.
Especially depressing i n
Wells' story are the accounts
of the sufferings that were
undergone under the Nazis by
children. It is a deeply mov-
ing description of the brutali-
ties he and the others had en-
dured in the concentration
camps.
The lootings when the Jewish
communities first were invaded
by the Nazis, the humiliations
that accompanied the murders
stand out as one long series of
indictments of the Russians.
Leon Wells, who was born in
Lvov, whose name arigihally was
Leon Welickzer, tells, while re-
vealing the plight of himself,
his doomed family, all who suf-
fered in the camps with him,
about the .Lvov tragedy. He re-
lates how he and his fellow Gasi-
dim had undergone tragic ex-
periences and how difficult was
the road to survival. His book
is an immense tale of heroism
as well as suffering. It is an-
other chapter in the series of
indictments of the Germans.

27,000 DUTCH JEWS
The • Jewish community of
The Netherlands, which dates
back to the 13th century, today
numbers some 27,000 persons,
about half of them living in
Amsterdam The pre-World
War II Jewish population total-
ed 'about 150,000.

LONDON, (JTA)—The Iraqui
cabinet passed a law requiring
that all Jews living in the coun-
try report to the Department of
Travel and Nationalities within
the next 10 days to preserve
their Iraqui nationality. The
law, which was published in the
Official Gazette, said that the
department, with the approval
of the security police, would
issue cards attesting to Iraqui
nationality.
To receive the cards, Jews
will be required to provide their
names and addresses. Those not
given cards will have their
properties impounded and will
be denationalized. The Gazette
said that many Jews had
dropped their Iraqui nationality
and changed their names.

Fred Shabel, former assistant
basketball coach at Duke, has
taken over the reins at the Uni-
versity of Connecticut.

JOIN

THE FARBAND
LABOR ZIONIST
ORDER

andyou can also get
Blue Cross Blue Shield

Call
Saul Settler
DI 1-3317

You'll usher in 1964 in grand style
if you and your friends come to our

GALA NEW YEAR'S EVE PARTY

Tuesday, December 31st

Dancing to the Martin-David Orchestra . • •
Food to titillate your tostebuds . .
Entertainment, Decorations, Favors Galore . . .

$15.00 per couple
Call for reservations now !

Sholem Aleichem Institute

VE 8-7440

19350 Greenfield Road

Men's Club of Cong. Beth Abraham

. Presents

SECOND BREAKFAST FORUM

SUNDAY, DEC. 15-10 A.M.

Mr. "HY" CRYSTAL, better known
as MR. BNA1 BRITH, will speak on
the changing world.

HY

Breakfast will be served
promptly at 10 a.m.

CRYSTAL

Use your season ticket or purchase
a single ticket at the door—$1.25 per person

a

M1D-WINTER

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g)ance

DECEMBER 31st

COCKTAILS AT 8:30

DINNER AT 9:00 P.M.

(Catered by Holiday Manor)

Breakfast will follow Dancing to

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DICK STEIN'S BIG BAND
With JOE CORNELL

Set-Ups Available

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$25.00 per couple

ROSMAN SOCIAL HALL
CONGREGATION BNAI MOSHE
MI LE KENOSHA — OAK PARK

FOR TICKETS
General Chairman
SIMON GOLDMAN — LI 5-3181
or THE SYNAGOGUE OFFICE — LI 8-9000

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