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November 22, 1963 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1963-11-22

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Friday, Nov. 22, 1963 — THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS — 6

Goldmann Presses for Bonn nestitntion
Bill, Normalization With West Germany

BONN (JTA) — The Bunde-
stag, West Germany's lower
house of parliament, was em-
broiled in a dispute over the
restitution to be paid to victims
of Nazism who could not escape
from Iron Curtain countries
until after Oct. 1, 1953 — the
deadline for filing compensation
applications under the present
laws.
Many of those post-1953 re-
fugees are Jews. Jewish organi-
zations, led by Dr. Nahum Gold-
mann, chairman of the Confer-
ence on Jewish 'Material Claims
Against Germany, have been
pressing the German govern-
ment to amend the old laws so
as to treat the post-1953 re-
fugees in the same manner ac-
corded to those able to file ap-
plications before the 1953 cut-off
date. However, in two govern-
ment bills presented to the
Bundestag this weekend by Fin-
ance Minister Rolf Dahlgrun, a
flat sum of $150,000,000 would
be set aside in restitution pay-
ments to the post-1953 group.
Leaders of the Social Demo-
cratic party, which is the major
Opposition party in parliament,
said they will make every ef-
fort to liberalize the Finance
Minister's proposals. The post-
1953 group, estimated to total
between 50,000 and 150,000 re-
fugees, came here from various
countries behind the Iron Cur-
tain, most of them from Hun-
gary, Rumania and Bulgaria.
Dahlgrun appealed to the
Bundestag, in presenting his
bills on the first reading this
weekend, not to go beyond the
figures he envisaged, warning
that any higher payments
would endanger the country's
economy. He insisted that
Germany has already paid out
in restitution and compensa-
tion to victims of Nazism far
more than anticipated when
the present laws were enact-
ed in 1952.
He was supported "in prin-
ciple" by Prof. Franz Boehm,
one of the leaders of the Social
Democratic Party, who told par-
liament that the new claims
should be studied carefully and
not be rejected arbitrarily. Mar-
tin Hirsch, another Social De-
mocrat, chairman of his party's
restitution committee, said he
will make every effort to liberal-
ize the amendments before they
are brought up on second read-
ing.
In addition to fixing a flat sum
of $150,000,000 to aid the post-
1953 applicants, the Finance
Minister proposed in the govern-
ment bills: an increase in the
amounts of pensions paid to vic-
tims of Nazism; less stringent
standards of proof needed to
claim damage to health caused
by Nazi oppression; doubling of
compensation for Nazi victims
whose professional and academic
training was interrupted, from
$1,250 to $2,250; and provision
of health insurance for persons
now receiving compensation and
pensions.

In general, the new amend-
ments would speed payments
of approved claims by Nazi
victims. They would provide
for immediate payments of all
claims for sums under $10,-
000, and payments of a large
percentage of higher claims
by Jan. 1, 1964, and Jan. 1,
1965, with full payment by
Jan. 1, 1967. In addition,
there would be established a
fund of $100,000,000 for settle-
ment of additional claims for
confiscated jewelry which the
Nazis had melted down into
gold.
* *
NEW YORK (JTA) — The
normalization of the relation-
ship between the Jewish people
and Germany, and, in a more
formal way, between the State
of Israel and the Federal Re-
public, was urged by Dr. Nahum
Goldmann, president of the
World Jewish Congress.
Addressing a memorial con-
cert sponsored jointly by the
American Federation of Jews
from Central Europe, and Auf-
bail, a German-language Jewish
weekly, Goldmann said that such
normalization was "inevitable,
although it must come gradually
as difficult psychological inhibi-
tions and emotions are involved
which require time to over-
come."
He urged Jewish leaders to
"have the courage to proceed on
this road, despite a natural re-
sistance by parts of Jewish pub-
lic opinion." In many respects,
Goldmann declared, "as for in-
stance in the problem of diplo-
matic relations with Israel, the
initiative has to come from the
Germans, and it should not be
delayed too long."
Describing the relationship
between the Jewish people
and Germany as "psychologi-
cally and morally the most
difficult and delicate problem
facing our Jewish generation
of today," Goldmann warned
that the Jews must not try to
ignore the existence of Ger-
many and the problem of
German-Jewish relations "as
many Jews would like to do."
"The existence of Germany
and its increasing importance
in world affairs," Goldmann
declared, "is an objective part
which no unrealistic attempt
of the Jewish people it ignore
it could change. Therefore, it
was the proper thing to start
years ago, negotiations with
the Federal Republic on in-
demnification and reparations.
The result was not only of
tremendous material import-
ance to Israel and hundreds of
thousands of Jewish Nazi vic-
tims; but, by acting generous-
ly, Germany has facilitated its
rehabilitation and its coming
back into the family of civiliz-
ed nations."
Stressing that the Jews can
never forget what was done to
them in the Nazi period, "nor
should the Germans try to for-
get it," Goldmann said that "the

knowledge of what they have
done must become part of the
German's historical conscience
as a pre-condition for their
moral re-education which would
make the recurrence of such
horrors impossible."
Warning that the Jewish
people must always remain on
guard, Goldmann said: "Our
generation has committed the
sin of underestimating the Nazi
movement in its beginning. Much
of the tragedy would have been
avoided, if our people would not
have taken this easy-going atti-
tude. And, although one cannot
foresee under normal circum-
stances a repetition of the Nazi
period, it is obvious that the
Jewish people must r e in a i n
watchful and rather be oversen-
sitive to symptoms of neo-Naz-
ism in Germany and elsewhere,
than indifferent."

5 Greek Groups Back Hillel at Northwestern

An instance of fraternity-
sorority support of Hillel cul-
tural programs took place at
Northwestern University when
five Greek groups contributed
funds to make possible the pub-
lication of a 12-page booklet an-
nouncing a series of seven lec-
tures on "Existentialism—Revo-
lution in Value," presented by
the Bnai Brith Hillel Founda-
tions on seven Sunday evenings
in October and November.
The first lecture, by Dr. Will
Herberg, professor of Judaic
studies at Drew University, at-
tracted an overflow audience of
600.
Subsequent lectures will be
given by distinguished faculty

members from Northwestern,
who will speak on several
existentialist philosophers, writ-
ers and artists, ending on Nov.
24 with a lecture on Marc
Chagall.

YOUNG MAN WANTED

Capable, confident salesman
with some real estate experi-
ence, for steady salaried set-
up, paying $8000 to $9000
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THE JEWISH NEWS

BOX 605

17100 W. 7 Mile Rd.,
Detroit 35, Michigan

Report Jewish
Problem in Germany
Still 'Formidable'

LONDON, (JTA)—The Daily
Telegraph reported from Bonn
that there were 30,000 Jews
currently living in West Ger-
many, few of whom "feel secure
yet" and many of whom main-
tain dual nationality.
About 8,000 of them have no
contact with the Jewish com-
munity. some even pretending
to be Gentile Germans, the re-
port said. Relations with the
Germans are still inhibited by
memories of the Nazi past and
most of the Germans, burdened
with guilt feelings, tend to over-
compensate in their behavior
toward Jews.
Other Germans, the report
continued, unthinkingly disclose
their latent anti - Semitism
though less openly than the
Austrians. "All in all, 25 years
after Crystal Night, when the
Nazis roamed through German
and Austrian cities, setting syn-
agogues afire and beating and
killing Jews, the problems of
Jews in Germany remain for-
midable," the report stated.
At national levels, however,
relations have developed sur-
prisingly well, the report stress-
ed. The West Germans are ful-
filling their restitution obliga-
tions, West Germany has be-
come Israel's third largest trad-
ing partner and the West Ger-
man army is equipped with Is-
raeli guns and German soldiers
wear Israeli-made shirts and
sports trousers. They also use
Israel-made mortar ammunition
of which hundreds of thousands
of rounds are purchased.

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