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September 20, 1963 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1963-09-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



J. Klein-Haparash, who now
makes his home in I s r a e 1,
writes from personal experi-
ences from a thorough knowl-
edge of the situations that
existed in Eastern Europe and
in Germany in the early years
of the last world war. His
monumental novel, "He Who
Flees the Lion," published by
Atheneum (162 E. 38th, N.Y.
16), contains all the evidence
of authoritative writing.
Very ably translated from
the German by Richard and
Alara W i n s t o n, this novel
depicts the Nazi horrors in
their early stages, the events
in Poland, Romania, Germany
and Russia, the anti-Semitid
sentiments that sprung up
everywhere.
Taking the title from Amos
v:19—"As if a man fled from
a lion, and a bear met him;
or went into the house and
leaned his hand against the
wall, and a serpent bit him"—
the dramatic story deals with
flight and frights, with machi-
nations that did not absolve
any of the scores of characters
from suspicions because of the
battle for life.
This is a novel that is full
of episodes related to the
threats that accompanied hu-
man beings when the war of
horrors was imposed upon
Europe. Jews and non-Jews are
interlinked here, at time in
conflict, monetary values play-
ing a major role, and often the
hatreds that were bred in men
emerge in all their burtality.
An entire epoch in history
is exposed here. The aristi-
cracies of Germany, Hungary,
Romania and England play
their roles here, and Jews who
had risen to financial power
are depicted as participants in
the- emerging necessity to res-
cue what they could just as
the great danger was approach-
ing.
* * *
The novel is divided in six
books, and a list of the prin-
cipal characters appearing at
the beginning assists the
reader in keeping track of the
developing episodes which take
place—from Nov. 28, 1939, to
May 10, 1940—in Romania, Po-
land, Russia, taking the reader
to Germany, to relatives of the
characters in England and in
Switzerland.
At once, the titles of the
books explain the aim of the
book and the a u t h o r's ap-
proach. In "One Is Chosen,"
"The Rescuers - and the
Rescued," "The Girl Up from
the Cella r," "The House,"
"Howl with the Wolves" and
"The Peasant and the Power,"
we have panoramas of the vari-
ous stages in the flight, the
attempt at rescue, the struggles
which often reveal that each is
for himself.
The girl Mira—who rose to
great financial power when she
married into a wealthy family,
rising from poverty; who dis-
played great financial skill;
who, when trapped in Russia
with her husband whose father
had her pledge that she would
never abandon, became an effi-
cient bookkeeper—is one of the
most- impressive characters in
a book full of outstanding per-
sonalities.
Mira, whose fate was to be
deported from Russia with her
husband, had two love affairs.
One, with Vassily, a member of
this cast whose strong will and
desire to be helpful impress
themselves upon the reader;
and another with a count whom
she had enriched and helped
escape poverty. The latter ex-
perience ends abruptly when
the "nobleman," sensing that
Mira, in order to save his life,
wanted him to desert the
Polish army, showed his true
colors. In spite of a long pe-
riod of loving-m akin g, the

count reveals his true nature,
his anti-Semitism sprouted.
It was then that Count
Vladek Voronovski called Mira
a "filthy, stinking Jewess" and
shouted: "How right Hitler is—
the whole lot of you should be
slaughtered." It was a shocking
revelation to the Jewish woman
who showed her lover so much
tenderness! She drove him out,
conceding that she wanted him

for her own lust.
* * *

Then came other experiences,
in Romania, in Russia — often
marked by reverberations of
anti-Semitism.
In Russia there frequently
was evidenced an interest by
Jews in Judaism, the urge for
the kaddish when there was a
death, a nostalgic recollection of
the past. The under the Com-
munists there also was the warn-
ing that anti-Semitism is out-
lawed.
The stables, the horses, the
farms in collectivized Russia;
the speculations as to the future;
the desire to escape and the dire
signs of an impending disaster
as the Germans were approach-
ing — these are among the fac-
tors in a story written by a man
well informed about the era un-
der review that will hold the
reader glued to the long but
very exciting book.
* * *
Born in Romania in 1897, J.
Klein-Haparash was raised there
and in Vienna. During World
War 1 he fought as an Austrian.
Making illegal trips into the
Soviet Ukraine to inform Amer-
ican newspapers of the pogroms,
he crisscrossed Europe many
times, sometimes on horseback,
and he worked as a political
correspondent for German and
Romanian newspapers.
From 1940 to 1945 he lived
under the Russians (in Gernauti)
and was then imprisoned in
Kharkov. One of the millions
who escaped from German-oc-
cupied Kharkov to the Roman-
ian border, he was arrested
by the Romanians, transferred
to- a concentration camp and
from there to a "death camp."
Saved by a friend, Klein-
Haparash became part of a
group who smuggled children
out of German-occupied East
Galicia into Romania. Again he
was stood against a wall to be
shot, — a story he will tell in
his next book. In 1944 and 1945
he lived in Russia. He has lived
in Israel since 1946.
Klein-Haparash has been a

succeed the late President Itz-
hak Ben-Zvi, was born in Mir,
Russia. Mir was renowned for
its world famous Yeshiva.
At an early age, he joined the
Poalei Zion party and organized
Jewish self-defense in his na-
tive town and near-by villages.
ettM:

the labor periodical "Achdut" was awarded the honorary de-
edited by Ben-Zvi, David Ben- gree of Doctor of Hebrew Liter-
Gurion and others. He returned ature, in 1958, by the Jewish
to Russia and continued his Theological Seminary in Amer-
studies at the Academy, went to ica, and received other honor-
Freiburg and Strasburg. During ary awards.
On May 21, he was elected
World War I, he studied in
Berlin and was on the editorial the third President of Israel.
board of "Die juedische Rund-
schau."
JDC Meeting Dec. 5
After having played an im-
portant part in Palestine journ- The 49th annual meeting of
alism, he entered Palestine's the Joint Distribution Commit-
political life, working for refu- tee will be held Dec. 5, at the
gees and seeking to see how New York Hilton Hotel, New
they could be helped. In 1943, York, it was announced by Ed-
he drew up a manifesto of the ward M. M. Warburg, JDC
Vaad Leumi, in which, for the Chairman.
first time, he directed world
attention to the German holo-
IF YOU TURN THE
caust.
In April 1948, Shazar drafted
the resolution passed by the
UPSIDE DOWN YOU WON'T
Zionist General Council, an-
FIND A FINER WINE THAN
nouncing Jewish independence
Zalman Shazar, as a student at the end of the Mandate. He
was elected a member of the
in St. Petersburg in 1910.
1st, 2nd and 3rd Knesset and
As a delegate at a secret ses- became Minister of Education I, Milan Wineries, Detroit, Mich. j
sion of Poalei Zion at Minsk,
he met Itzhak Ben-Zvi in 1905
Best Wishes
and the two became life-long
friends.
to All
While working on the edito-
Our Friends
rial board of a socialist paper
and Customers
in Vilna, he and his friends
For
a Happy, Healthy
were arrested but soon released.
New Year
Admitted to the Academy of
Jewish learning in St. Peters-
Barnett Pontiac ALLEN CHARNES
burg, he was a pupil of Simon
MILT LEVIN
Dubnow, the noted Jewish his-
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Saved by a Name
The Talmud tells how a name
' saved a great rabbi. Rabbi Meir
stopped at an Inn—there was
no other hotel in the place—
where the I n n k e e p e r was
reputed to be an associate of
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Before the break of dawn,
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Every few minutes, the Inn-
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When it was fully light, the
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"Oh yes, he is," said Rabbi
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And God saw the light and said,
Ki Toy, It is good."

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9 -- THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS -- Friday, Sept. 29, 1963

Ip

Powerful Klein-Haparash Novel
Shazar, Israel's Third President, Noted as Writer
Shazar, veteran labor
In 1911, Shazar went to Pal- and a member of the Executive
Offers Panoramic View of Events and Zalman
Zionist leader, statesman, estine where he wrote his first Council of the Jewish Agency.
scholar and pioneer of Hebrew essay, "The Eternity of the
For his outstanding work in
Preceding Last War in Many Lands journalism, who was elected to Past",
which was published in literature and scholarship, he

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