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August 16, 1963 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1963-08-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WASHINGTON, (JTA)—The
House Foreign Affairs Commit-
tee formally reported that it
was "encouraged" that some
progress had been made in im-
plementation of non-discrimina-
tion policies of the Foreign As-
sistance Act, and that some
Arab states have "eased travel
restrictions affecting American
citizens of the Jewish faith."
"However," said the committee
report, "forward movement has
been slow and further effort is
required. Congress has repeat-
edly insisted that no country re-
ceiving U. S. aid should make
distinctions among our citizens
on the basis of religion or race."
The committee n )ted that,
while aid programs have con-
tributed to economic progress
in the Near East, and there
was evidence that Soviet influ-
ence sustained setbacks in some
countries of the region, "the
Near East continues to be un-
stable."
It was concluded by the
committee's study that "there
has been no progress toward
an Arab-Israel peace, and
little progress toward settle-
ment of the conflicts that di-
vide the Arab states." The
committee pointed out that
virulent threats disrupt sta-
bility, and warned of the
growing - arms race. "This
arms race began with conven-
tional weapons which the
Soviet bloc furnished to
Egypt in 1955, and has been
intensified in kind and in
proportion until there is now
danger of escalation to more
sophisticated weapons."
The committee observed that
"while Israel continues to make
rapid economic progress, it has
been compelled to go deeply
into debt in the effort to main-
tain the arms balance." The
committee held that an arms
race nullified the salutary ef-
fects of U. S. economic assist-
ance, and raised the threat of
hostilities. In the committee's
view, "our aid to Israel and the
Arab states should be adminis-
tered so as to discourage con-
flict and to promote stability in
the area."
"Consideration s h o u l d be
given," stated the committee,
"to the withholding of economic
assistance from those countries
which persist in policies of
belligerence, and in prepara-
tions fAr their execution, and to
entering into security guaran-
tees with those nations that
would be willing to make ap-
propriate commitments for pro-
moting peace and stability in
the area." The committee ex-
pressed belief that assistance to
Egypt should not be continued
unless that country honored an
agreement for withdrawal of
Egyptian forces from Yemen.
The Administration has in-
formed the committee that. al-
though the Palestine Arab refu-
gee problem remains, a number
of initiatives are under way
which ultimately should lead to
the achievement of a greater de-
gree of self-support by the ref-
ugees, and a lessening of the
need for U. S. assistance.
The Foreign Affairs Com-
mittee reported, however, that
the task of caring for "the
over 1,100,000 Palestine ref-
ugees" remains pending. the
achievement of a political so-
lution. But the committee ex-
pressed belief that, "for the
immediate future at least, the
UN Relief and Works Agency
for Palestine Refugees ap-
pears to be the most econom-
ical means of providing essen-
tial basic services to the ref-
ugees."
The committee proposed that
the U. S. contribution to
UNRWA for fiscal year 1964
remain at the same level as in
fiscal 1963 — $24,700,000, of
which $17,200,000 would repre-
sent a cash contribution to the
UNRWA budget and $2,500,000

would be made available under
the Food - for - Peace program.
This would represent about 70
per cent of total estimated con-
tributions to UNRWA. There
are 39 countries contributing to
UNRWA.
In its report on the $4,097,075
foreign aid authorization bill,
filed this weekend preparatory
for a "slugfest" on the issue,
the House Foregin Affairs Com-
mittee has threatened to halt
all aid to Egypt if the Nasser
regime persists in its hostile
attitude toward Israel and other
Middle East countries. Other ob-
jections to Nasser's policies
voiced by the House Committee
include the Egyptian dictator's
role in Yemen; as well as his
general interference in the af-
fairs of Middle East nations.
While, in the Senate, Senator
Kenneth B. Keating, New York
Republican, is on record as op-
posing aid to Nasser as long as
he continues his hostility toward

Israel, Rep. Seymour Halpern,
New York Republican, is ex-
pected to fight the unqualified
grant of aid to Nasser in the
House. Mr. Keating and Mr.
Halpern are adamant in push-
ing their amendment to the For-
eign Aid bill, calling for the
severance of aid to nations us-
ing their own resources for the
acquisition of Soviet arms. The
Keating-Halpern amendment has
already been dropped by the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee.

Scenic Drive
The Manitou Trail, origin-
ally laid out by the Indians
who once occupied Michigan's
Leelanau Peninsula, is said to
be one of the most delightful
drives in the Great Lakes re-
gion. The trail follows the Lake
Michigan shoreline on High-
way M-22, starting five miles
north of Manistee and ends at
Traverse City.

LONDON, (JTA)—A concert
of Jewish music and Yiddish
songs, the first since the Lith-
uanian Republic joined the
Soviet Union, has been pre-
sented at the Lithuanian holi-
day resort of Palange, where a
huge square was jammed for
the open-air performance, with
persons from all parts of the

republic, it was reported here
from Warsaw.
The program included tradi-
tional Jewish songs, including
Hassidic melodies, and also
modern pieces by Soviet Jewish
composers.

Wayne county was Michigan's
first county, created in 1796.

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7 -- THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS -- Friday, August 16, 19 63

Lithuanian Jews Hear First Yiddish Concert

‘Shugfese in Congress Against Nasser's
Antimisraelism; See Easing of Arab Bias

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