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July 26, 1963 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1963-07-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DE TROIT JEWISH NEWS — Friday, July 26, 1963

United Hebrew Schools' Summer
Sessions Enhance Year's Program

BY MITZI RACHLEFF

The United Hebrew Schools
has combined recreation and
work in a summer program
formula designed to give
younger students a "painless
education" and older ones an
opportunity to choose .electives
which will advance their par-
ticular interest.
According to Superintendent
Albert Elazar, UHS has, for the
first time in its 10-year history
of summer sessions, extended
elementary school hours from
9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., five days
a week throughout July. The
school operation also includes
courses of study at the high
school, college (Midrasha) and
teacher training levels.
The elementary school is
divided into four major areas
during the summer. Its main
purpose is to teach informally
what was omitted from the
regular school year due to pres-
sures and time-consuming for-
mal studies. It gives teachers
and children the occasion to
get to know each other on a
more familiar level, Elazar said.
The day is begun with ser-
vices in the auditorium where
teachers are a s s i g n e d to
groups concentrating on spe-
cific topics. This year, the
lath anniversary of Israel is
the overall subject. There are
readings in Hebrew on ma-
terial dealing with the long-
ing of Jews for Israel, pray-
ers and songs perpetuated
over the years towards Is-
rael, and arts and crafts in
which children select cities
and kibbutzim in Israel as
models.
During their noon lunch hour,
the children are with coun-
selors, most of them graduates
of the school. After lunch, out-
door sports and indoor games
keep the pupils occupied until
.3 p.m. The group swims in the
Mumford High School pool and
there are frequent outings to
b e a c h e s, Bob-Lo and other
places of interest.
"The children are encouraged
to speak Hebrew," relates Ela-
zar. "This helps them to main-
- tain the mood of the class-
room."
A second purpose of the ele-
mentary level is to coach chil-
dren who have failed in June
in order to prevent their failure
in September. Parents are con-
tacted as soon as report cards
indicate failure and are advised
to send their children for three
hours of formal education daily
under the guidance of special-
ized teachers equipped to help
slower learners. This program,
Elazar feels, tends to discour-
age dropouts.
A t h i r d area is an ac-
celerated program for A-aver-
age children who are double-
trOinoted.. in September upon
...he recommendation of teach-
ers and principal.

.—

-

Completing the curriculum is
special program for boys go-
ing to be Bar Mitzvah the fol-
owing 'year. They come as a
group during the summer and
have the opportunity to get in
practice by conducting services
themselves, putting on the tefil-
lin and learning the notes in
the chanting of the Haftorah.
The High School program is
directed to students who attend
Hebrew high school during the
regular year. Says E 1 a z a r,
"There is no reward for their
coming. They do it out of in-
spiration from teachers to add
to their knowledge."
These students m a y select
special concentrations accord-
ing to their needs and interest.
Generally, subjects are offered
which are not required during
the regular semester, such as
certain parts or chapters of
the Bible. The other major sub-
jects are composition, grammar
and Hebrew language skills,

(

Lieberman-Lopatin
Troth Announced

News Brevities

the history of customs and cere-
monies in Judaism, and the
Mishnah. Plays are given and
outings held.
"The college, or Midrasha,
is primarily for those young
people remaining in the city
during • the summer who are
preparing to teach Hebrew,"
Elazar says. "Many of these
students are now visiting Is-
rael and some work as coun-
selors at Hebrew camps."

The students come four hours
a day, four days weekly, for a
period of , five weeks to study
specific formal subjects. These
include Biblical archaeology,
topography and geography of
Israel; the historic study of
customs and miracles which are
interpreted at the child's level
of comprehension; modern
Hebrew writers in America;
Jewish philosophy; education
and arts and crafts.
The teachers' training, or in-
service program, held for one
hour a day, is divided into two
courses: a literature class, this
summer dealing with the Is-
raeli writer Agnon, and taught
by a graduate of the Hebrew
University in Jerusalem, Man-
gel; and a class to acquaint
teachers with the educational
materials prepared by the
school. Techniques, and the
strength a n d weaknesses o f
books are examined under the
direction of Elazar.
The library at United Heb-
rew, consisting of 10,000-12,000
volumes, lends itself to research
and supplemental reading. The
books are in Hebrew, Yiddish
and English. Maps for Bible
and historical study, film strips,
periodicals a n d newspapers
from Israel are all catalogued
to compose the strong reference
library, At other branches of
the Sc h o o 1, bookmobiles are
maintained, featuring 2,800 chil-
dren's books alone.

`Wigs 'n Things' Opens
in Bloomfield Hills

A salon for wigs only, entitled
"Wigs 'n Things, Inc.," has
opened at 91 W. Long Lake Rd.,
Bloomfield Hills.
The shop, which coifs and
sells wigs, wiglets and hair or-
naments, is the brainchild of
Chadwick Fowler and Peter
Mays, two internationally known
hair stylists who run a chain of
salons in Fort Lauderdale, San
Francisco, Beverly Hills and six
in Canada, and a Detroit associ-
ate, Josephine Johnson of 21
Elm Park, Pleasant Ridge.
Equipment includes specially
built sinks to accommodate
blocks for the cleaning or color-
ing of wigs.
The decor was planned by
Fowler, a succesful decorator
before becoming a hair stylist.
Prices range from $100 for a
weft wig to $1,200 for a wig
with "Hollywood Netting." with
hand-mades accounting for the
wide range in between.
Styling prices run $10 for a
set and comb out, which usually
includes a complimentary make-
up.
"We prefer to comb the wig
on the customer whenever pos-
sible," says Mays. "so we often
do her make-up as a courtesy."
In place of the usual coffee
offered to customers. "Wigs 'n
Things" serves wine and hors
d'oeuvres although coffee and
tea. served in antique Sevres
cups, is available.

Men s Club

Dr. Nathan Starinan, Worship-
ful Master, announced that MO-
SAIC LODGE, F.&A.M., will hold
its ninth annual golf outing 9
a.m. Aug. 6 at the Western Golf
and Country Club. Tickets for
lunch, dinner and swimming
may be obtained from Aaron
Katzman, S.D., LI 8-0707.

The colorful gaity of music,
magic and romance, set in a
circus motif, continues at North-
land Playhouse as "THE CAR-
NIVAL," award winning Broad-
way musical starring Ann Blyth
and Ray Danton, goes into its
second week on Tuesday.
* * *
WINDSOR INTERNATION-
AL THEATRE FESTIVAL pre-
sents the light comedy "Oh Mis-
tress Mine," by Terence Ratti-
gan, tonight and tomorrow at
the Cleary Auditorium. From
July 29 to Aug. 10 Paddy Chay-
efsky's "Gideon" will be given.
Curtain time is 8:40 p.m.

*

MISS JOANNE LIEBERMAN

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Lieberman
of Steel Ave. announce the
engagement of their daughter,
Joanne Ruth, to Sheldon Ross
Lopatin, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Hyman Lopatin of Kipling Ave.,
Oak Park. A December wedding
is planned.

Histadrut Arranges
Plans for All Needs
on Cruises to Israel

HiJtadru Vs unparalleled
knowledge of Israel opens doors
that are closed to most who
visit Israel, making for a mem-
orable vacation
Five different cruises are
available, all starting from New
York City on Sept. 4 via the
air-conditioned luxury liner TSS
Olympia.
There are three weeks in
Israel during the High . Holy
Days: Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kip-
pur and Succoth. The return
trip is via one of the gleam-
ing new Boeing 707 Intercon-
tinental Jets of El Al Airlines.
Among some of the features
offered are first class hotel ac-
commodations; Rosh Hashanah
services at the Great Syna-
gogue in Tel Aviv (reserved
seats upon request) Oneg Shab-
bath at Histradut Headquarters
in Tel Aviv, in the company of
Israeli dignitaries; Yom Kip-
pur services at the Yeshurwi
Synagogue in Jerusalem; special
rail car from Haifa to Tel
Aviv; Israel Night with thrill-
ing folk-dancing and singing;
luncheon at the University
Campus in Jerusalem; recep-
tion by government officials in
Jerusalem; afternoon as guest
of the splendid Caesarea Golf
Club; gala farewell dinner in
Tel Aviv.
For free brochure and fur-
ther infirmation on all Israeli
and Europe Tours, contact
Histadrut Tours, 19161 Schae-
fer, UN 4-7094.

* *

production especially for child-
ren, will be presented twice
this month as part of the Civic
Center Theatre's summer
series.
Players are members of the
St. Clair Shores Studio Theater
Guild, who are providing sub-
urban participation in this De-
trOit Department of Parks and
Recreation program. The show
will be presented at 2 p.m. July
20 at Stoepel Park 1, and on
July 27 at Chandler Park. Ad-
mission is free.
* * *
Federico Felini's long await-
ed new film, "8 1/2", is the
famed director's first full-
length feature since the ac-
claimed "La Dolce Vita".
Joseph E. Levine is presenting
the film, already hailed by
critics as Fellini's most im-
portant and possibly most con-
troversial work, and it will be
premiered locally in Detroit at
the Trans-Lux Krim Theater.

Two presentations of a spe-
cially adapted production of
Shakespeare's "MIDSUMMER
NIGHT'S DREAM" will climax
the Tent Theater productions
of the Detroit Department of
Parks and Recreation. The first
production will be Saturday,
July 20, at Stoepel Park; the
second on July 27 at Chandler
Park. Curtain time for both
More than 4,000 of the 7,000
shows is 8:30 p.m. Admission
is free. Director is Shirley Har- islands and islets which make up
bin, drama director of Parks the Philippines are unnamed.
and Recreation.
* * *
"THE ELVES AND THE
SHOEMAKER", a Tent Theater

PLANNING
A WEDDING?
A BAR MITZVAH?

For the HY Spot
Of Your Affair
Music by

REMEMBER . . .

SID SIEGEL

Hy Herman

SAVES THE DAY!

And His Orchestra
(Hy Utchenik)

For Fine
Color Movies Call

BR 2-5447

DI 1-6990

• Distinctive Ceremonies
a Specialty!

"ARCHIE" MARGOLIS, Formerly of Dexter
Has Merged with ABE SKORE

And Invites His Friends and Customers
to Stop and See Him at

13514 W. 7 MILE ROAD

Between Hartwell & Schaefer

MARGOLIS & SKORE

KOSHER MEATS & POULTRY

Complete Selection of Kosher Frozen Foods

DI 1-2840

WE DELIVER

AMPLE FREE PARKING IN REAR

SHOP NOW AND SAVE AT

REISMAN'S MARKET

Judge Wade•McCree
to Speak to Workmen's
Circle Golden Ringers

13400 W. 7 MILE RD. cor. Snowden

Wade H. McCree, Jr., Justice
AMPLE PARKING
FREE DELIVERY
DI 1-4 5 2 5
of the United States District
Court for the Eastern District
of Michigan, will address the
KOSHER KILLED, YOUNG, SMALL
to 12 Lb.
Workmen's Circle Golden Ring
Lb.
Average
Club 12:30 p.m. Wednesday at
a luncheon at the Workmen's
4(
Circle Educational Center, 18340
Lb.
W. Seven Mile.
McCree is a recipient of a
citation reward from the Mich-
Lb.
igan Regional Advisory Board
of the ADL of Bnai Brith. His
community and civic activities
Cans
include advisory board mem-
Qt. a 9c tr
bership of the Borman Near
Btls. #
Eastern Lecture Series at
Wayne State University. The
QC t ic
Ox.
public is invited.
9
.4F
Workmen's Circle Branch
460-E has planned an evening
of fun, food ,and a little bit
of pertinent business for their
it
meeting on Saturday. A splash
Lbs.
party and weenie roast will
precede the business end of
the agenda at the home of Mr.
and Mrs . Eugene Brownstein
Lb.
22145 Sussex, Oak Park. For
reservations, p hone Rochelle
Above Specials Good July 26 thru Aug.
Aronson, VE 8-3534, or Goldie
Pilcul in.
. *******************************************V

HEN TURKEYS
FANCY FRYERS

10

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DELICIOUS TASTY SMOKED SABLE .
STARKIST TUNA
ROKEACH BEET BORSCHT . . . .
NESCAFE INSTANT COFFEE . .
DAISY BRAND WHIPPED BUTTER 8 , - f, ) ,z..
U.S. NO. I DRY ONIONS . . 3

.

FRESH TROUT or WHITEFISH . . . .

29

79c
99

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