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June 14, 1963 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1963-06-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Kasle Presented with Illuminated Megillah
at JNF Testimonial Attended by 550
People; Sen. Morse Urges Aid to Israel

More than 550 friends and co-
workers of Abe Kasle in many
local and national causes joined
on Wednesday in paying honor
to him and to Mrs. Kasle at the
testimonial dinner held at the
Shaarey Zedek social hall.
The event marked the comple-
tion of the Kasle Family Forest
in Israel. It was sponsored by
the Jewish National Fund Coun-
cil of Detroit.
With U. S. Senator Wayne
Morse of Oregon as principal
speaker and Hyman Safran as
toastmaster, the program empha-
sized the Detroit leader's num-
erous contributions towards Is-
rael's upbuilding, to Zionism and
to the JNF, and to the cause of
Jewish education.
In recognition of his devo-
tion to the JNF and to the
many Jewish causes. Kasle
was presented with a silver
Megillah appended to which
was an inscribed parchment
enumerating his services to
Jewry.
The presentation to Kasle was
made by Rabbi Jacob E. Segal.
Mrs. Kasle also was presented
with a gift — reproductions of
photographs taken of her and
her husband in Israel during
the 'planting of the first trees
in the Kasle Forest.
Morris Brandwine, as chair-
man of the. JNF Council who
also headed the committee of
arrangements for the testimo-
nial dinner, greeted the gather-
ing and expressed gratitude to
Kasle for his efforts in behalf
of the land reclamation and
other programs of activities in
Israel.
Brandwine - reviewed the ac-
complishments of the JNF and
indicated plans for a continu-
ing program to assure security
for newcomers and protection
through vast development proj-

REMEMBER

F



There is
Still Time to
Pay Tribute to



FATHER

On Father's Day

Sunday, June 16, by

PLANTING
TREES IN
ISRAEL

IN HIS NAME I.

A Growing Tree is a Living
Tribute to your Father . . .
Eitz Chayim He—it is a tree
of Life . . . Let Trees in
Israel Honor, or Memorial-
ize Him.

PHONE

ects for Israel's frontiers.
Safran spoke of Kasle as "a
man of action" who has made
noteworthy contributions to the
community in the forefront of
many movements. "He has help-
ed make Detroit one of the most
vital Jewish communities in the
land," Safran said.
In his response, Kasle told
of his early interest in Zion-
ism and his devotion to the
principles of the Jewish Na-
tional Fund. He said the Blue
and White JNF box always
had a place of honor in his
home and he declared that he
and his family are grateful to
have their names linked with
Israel through the establish-
ment of the Kasle Forest on
JNF land in the Jewish State.
Kasle took occasion also to
speak of his interest in Jewish
education and declared that "the
Jewish National Fund is a factor
for good in our schools" in that
"it teaches children to plant
trees" and leads them to "mak-
ing Jewish life meaningful."
In his address, Senator Morse
was critical of the State Depart-
ment's attitude on Israel. He
declared:
"The future safety and se-
curity of Israel must be a mat-
ter of interest and concern to
the United States, as to the
freedom-loving people every-
where. Israel's security in-
volves the peace of the Middle
East, and continued organized
antagonism on the part of her
neighbors can involve both the
United States and the Soviet
Union. Not the least of Israel's
importance is her determina-
tion to make a political and
economic democracy in the
Middle East. Recognition of
her leadership is already win-
ning for Israel—and for free-
dom—a considerable demand
for Israeli assistance in other
parts of Africa.
"The Arab states have, un-
fortunately, continued to
pledge themselves to the physi-
cal destruction of Israel. Radio
Cairo has carried on one of
the most vitriolic and inflam-
matory attacks against h e r
neighbors known to modern
history.
"The most ominous threat
is now coming from the effort
of the United Arab Republic
to develop a nuclear attack
force, with the assistance of
German Nazi scientists. This
clandestine missile develop-
m e n t in no way hindered
President Nasser of the UAR
from joining Tito in a pious
and hypocritical call for gen-
eral disarmament.
"The argument of the Ameri-
can State Department that if
Nasser did not receive this
help from western nations he

Israel Emissary
to Address JNF
Election Meeting

Jacob Behar, new emissary
for the United States on loan
The Jewish
by the Israeli government to
National Fund
help the Jewish National Fund
in its obligations of land de-
velopment, will be the guest of
the local JNF Council of Rep-
FOR A TREE CERTIFICATE
resentatives, Monday, at 8:30
FOR YOUR FATHER
P.M., at the Labor Zionist Insti-

tute, according to Morris J.
ISRAEL
Brandwine, JNF president. An-
nual. election of officers and
NEEDS
Members of the board will take
TREES
place at Monday's meeting.
Behar, whose quarters will be
in Cleveland, has occupied re-
sponsible posts in the political
and cultural fields in Israel and
JEWISH
is now secretary. of the financial
NATIONAL
department of the Hebrew Uni-
versity.
. FUND
A social hour will follow the
18414 WYOMING AVENUE
meeting. Friends of JNF and
ALL CONTRIBUTIONS TO JNF
ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE
Israel are invited.

UN 4-2767

would turn to Communist na-
tions is, in turn, equally mean-
ingless as a guide for Ameri-
can policy. It is doubletalk,
that only proves to both sides
that we are not committed to
freedom there, but only to
playing the parties against
each other."
Senator Morse said he asso-
ciated himself with Senator Hart
of Michigan and along with Sena-
tors Humphrey, G r u e n i n g,
McCarthy and Clark, "in calling
upon this Administration to do
all in its power to remove from
the Middle East the threat of
missile and nuclear warfare and
to seek international enforce-__
ment of a ban on such weapons
in the Middle East."
"Our resolution," he s a i d,
"restates the 1950 Tripartite
Agreement among the U. S.,
Britain, and France, that the
three will take all necessary and
appropriate actions, both within
and outside the United Nations
to prevent any violation of Is-
rael's frontiers."
"Certainly," Senator Morse
declared, "if freedom is worth
helping anywhere, it is worth
helping in Israel. The United
States should stand for some-
thing better than its present
policy of trying to ride two
horses going in opposite direc-
tions."
Senator Morse emphasized
that "we must export economic
freedom," that "we cannot ex-
port political freedom" without
the economic opportunities that
can contribute towards the solv-
ing of problems of many na-
tions.
"Israel," he said, "is a bas-
tion for economic freedom

in the Middle East."
He said he had been unhappy
with the approaches to the 'Mid-
dle 'East issue by both political
parties and he disagreed with
the recent statement by Averell
Harriman in behalf of the. State
Department.
"There must be no further
aid to Nasser until we get a
commitment from the Arabs
that they will not attack Is-
rael," he declared. "I shall
continue as long as I am in
the Senate to strive for peace
between Arabs and Israel
and I won't support dictartor-
ships anywhere."
He admonished his audience:
"If you want to leave a heritage
of peace for your children, you
have to strengthen economic
freedom in the world and then
we'll have a seedbed for politi-
cal freedom."
Rabbi Segal, presenting the
award to Kasle, described him
as one who is "articulate on
behalf of a grateful commu-
nity." He reviewed Kasle's
many interests and empha-

GAN

Borman Cash Dividend
The directors of BOrman
Food Stores, Inc., at its quar-
terly meeting, declared a cash
dividend'of 12 1/2 cents per share,
to be paid July 10, to stockhold-
ers of reoitrd of the company at
the close of business on June
21, 1962.,

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35 Years of Experience

Another de Hartog
Meritorious Novel

Those who have read the re-
markable story about a survivor
from Nazism. and her difficult
trek Israel-ward in "The In-
spector," by Jan de Hartog, will
crave for all forthcoming writ-
ings by this able Dutch writer.
His newest work, "The Artist."
published by Atheneum (162 E.
38th, NY16) confirms all expec-
tations of great writing by de
Hartog.
The story has a Biblical ap-
proach. It is a. tale about Joost
Jansen who has talent for draw-
ing, whose art work is com-
mended and accepted but who
turns to the sea and to the life
of a sailor.
Fifty years have passed and
again he draws, after retiring
from a seaman's life. While pur-
suing his work on a houseboat,
he draws up at the Seine, makes
friends in Paris and has an ex-
perience that gives the de Har
tog story special merit. A dog,
bedraggled, f i l t h y, bandaged,
draws up to him. Joost finally
pets him, and when the rightful
owner, who had been using the
animal for tests at the Pasteur
Institute, demands him, Joost
refuses to give him up. The dog
finally dies and the houseboat
collapses. Joost reads his Bible,
and the Scriptural portion con-
cludes with a Christological ap-
proach.
But the dog tale, the descrip-
tion of Joost's loyalty to the
dying animal, emerges as one of
de Hartog's most brilliant nar-
ratives.
Joseph Low's halftones give
the book, which measures 71/4
by 81/2 inches, added merit.

sized the services he has ren-
dered to the United Hebrew
Schools, the Allied -Jewish
Campaign, the Zionist moVe-
ment and more recently . , to
the Hillel Day School.
Harry Cohen led in the Birkat
Hamazon.
Cantor J. H. Sonenklar led
in the singing of the national
anthems. The invocation and
benediction were given by
Rabbis Leon Fram and Haim
Donin.

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