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May 31, 1963 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1963-05-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS — Friday, May 3 1, 1963

N

Maurice Edelman's `Fratricides'
Powerful Novel Based on OAS
erro Against
Freedom
t.) - Alger
t,

Yiddish. Wit, Hasidic Antholowv, Zohar,
Eschatology, Self-Portraits in Paperbacks

Schocken Books, the worldHasidism," Hayyim N a h m a n of the more tender, sympathetic
famous Jewish publishing ven- I M alik s "Before Thirty," an ex- and humane elements of Jewish
Maurice Edelman, a member ; expression also in anti-Jewish tore whose headquarters n o w cerpt from Glueckel of Hameln, thought and practice."
fo the British House of Com- declarations. are at 67 Park Ave., New York Ahad Ha'am's "Memories of
mons since 1945, brings back 1 I There is a • love for Algeria 16, renders a noteworthy service Childhood," Sholem Aleichem's
"Eschatology," another of the
recollections of Benjamin Dis- ' among the Hassids, and it . is to American Jewry with its lat- "Life of a Humorist," David Reu- new Schocken paperbacks, is a
raeli. Like the latter, he serves evidenced in their refusal to est series of paperbacks which beni's "The Road to - Rome," critical history by R. H. Charles
in his country's Parliament and 11eave the country
Jacob Emden's "D e f e a t of of the doctrine of future life in
y even though include . significant classics.
at the .same time writes fiction.; their lives are endangered: Eli-
Included in the new works
ancient Israel, Judaism and
Disraeli, unlike Edelman, had ane asserts her love, she had a ai .: works on Kabbalah, vignettes noteworthy selections are in Christianity.
aspirations of becoming Prime chance to leave earlier and to by great scholars of the last this volume.
An introduction to this 480-
Minister, and attained his goal. ' take her' father along. She backed nine centuries, an eschatological
Among the other scholars from page book by Dr. George Wesley
But in fiction they are akin-- the Alendes - France p o 1 i c i e s,, study, a Hasidic anthology and whose works Schwarz has taken Buchanan of Wesley Theological
in the sense of justice evident which were for a liberated Al- Yiddish proverbs.
selections for inclusion in this Seminary declares that the
in the novels of both men.
geria. She had gone so far as to
Under the editorship of the book are Leone de Modena, author, Archdeacon Robert
Edelman's "The Fratricides," : say that if she were an Arab Yiddish novelist Hanan J. Ayalti, Uriel da Costa, Yomtob Lip-
Henry Charles (1855-1931) "was
his newest novel, published by I. she'd be an FLN.
"Yiddish Proverbs" presents mann Heller, Don Isaac Abra- unequalled in his understanding
Random House, is certain to ! On the contrary, her husband, "the essence of Yiddish wit." vanel, Abrahani Aboulafia, Moses of the entire body of Jewish
rate among the very great nar- ;Walter de Croissilon, when con- The book contains the English Maimonides, Hayyim David Azu- apocalyptic literature available
ratives of our time and as one
ratives
by his fellow partisans translations of Yiddish sayings la', Eliakum Zunser, Mendele during his lifetime."
of the most effective descrip- ' as they were planning the battle which appear in Latin translit- Mother Seforim and others.
Archdeacon Charles is com-
tions of the drama that has re- ,against the FLN, recalled his love eration on opposite pages.
mended for the "intense inter-
cently been enacted in Algeria. :affair with Eliane and commen-
Dr. Louis I. Newman is one est" he had in Jewish literature,
The woodcuts by Bernard
ted, "I got a number of relatives
The plot itself, if it were called Levy and Bloch." To such Reder, a noted artist, enrich of the leading devotees to the for his mastery of the available
teachings and literature of the l material in both Testaments.
divorced from reality, would , an extent did venom creep in, this interesting volume.
serve as a great drama. It hap- endangering the Jewish position
The proverbs in this book will Hasidim% His "Hasidic Anthol- i Charles' study discusses Pau-
pens, however, also to be his- no matter which forces they enlighten and entertain. They ogy—Tales and Teachings of the 'line Eschatology, Apocryphal and
torically accurate, depicting the joined.
• enable sociologists to study Hasidim" has taken a deserved Apocalyptic literatures, Old and
* * :i:
tragic happenings in the period
Jewish attitudes. They reflect place among modern classics in New Testament eschatological
.
of transformation in Algeria,
aspects.
the thinking of generations that Jewish literature.
p
h
In collaboration with Samuel
-
the battle for independence by Walter
struck Eliane, when she produced them.
Spitz,
he
has
translated
and
ar-
the FLN (Front de Liberation . diculed her "damned intellec- ; Here are a few examples:
Hebrew Corner
.ri
Nationale; the Algerian Nation- •• tual pretensions," saying "it's all i ,.. .."A sheyn ponim kost gelt " ranged the tales in the new
o
Sch cken paperback from Yid-
L iberation
ven
-
"A
pretty
face
costs
osts
- right for the Mellah" (the North ! —.
dish, Hebrew and G e r m a n
to
'
to a lesser degree the MNA African
money."
ghetto). .
, .
ement.
!
v
(National Algerian Mo
"A sakh HoMens un eyn sources.
Megiddo is mentioned many times
the rival to FLN), and the re- i But Dr. Hassid tried to take
The tales in this 556-page in the Bible. The Bible tells us
Purint.""So many Hamans
that
a m o n g the canaanite kings
book appear under 205 title beaten
sistance by the OAS (Organi- . matters calmly, he philosophized, and but one Purim."
in battle by the tribes of
headings and cover every Israel led by Joshua Bin Nun, was
sation de lrmee Secrete; the : he told Jewish parables, he re-
"Az der Yid iz gerekhy,
King of Megiddo. King David
fused to •leave the scene of bat- khapt er ersht di rekhte klep"
imaginable subject — home the
secret army organization).
was the first Israeli king who was
Because of the division on tie—especially since he assumed --"When a Jew is right, that's
life, festivals, Christian-Jewish successful in capturing the city and
: . a role - of leadership in the move-
making it an Israeli city. Megiddo
relations,
intermarriage,
hap-
which was until then a Canaanite
the subject of Algeria'S inde- ment for amity — a role for when he gets a right good
piness,
good
deeds,
hypocrisy,
city-state, with a king of its own,
beating."
pendence among the French. • , which he paid with his life.
became
one of the cities in the
The entire collection is so music, preaching, morality, Israeli kingdom, among the impor-
because of .the revolt against i
etc., etc.
taut ones in the northern part of
of
the
situ-,
filled
with
witty
sayings
that
the
the position taken by deGaulle. 1_ The precariousness
the country. In the course of the
The great Hasidic rabbis are year, s a rIrde gni cln c c lio el, a as
layers
ia y
j c oavnecf e de
there was resistance, there were ation was expressed by a Jewish best advice to those who would
only l
murders of those who did not merchant who said to . Dr. Has- 'become acquainted with them is quoted here, their wisdom is re- of
mound remained, "Megiddo
fated
go along with the OAS, and : sid: "We Europeans are finished to read them allby acquiring counted in excellent English
narratives, many of the stories
Many years passed since its de-
therefore there was fratricide— ;—the Jews more so than anyone the boOk. .
* * *
struction. However, Megiddo was not
are brief, all to the point.
thus accounting for the descrip- else. As usual!" ,
rgotten. Our generation made it
forgotten.
One of the famous works on
Dr. Newman's work once again giddea
obj encrpe erteo uncover the Me-
tive title given to his novel by ; of At one. of the smug meetings
emte. rges as a noteworthy contri- its greatness. It ei vies from ilioaste t 11 P.
the OAS sympathizers a clis mysticism is included in the bu
Edelman.
* * *
t 1011 to Jewish scholarship. His iesx c v a vvrai titoenns have t cotnnfirmed all that
- series: It is the Zohar-
cession arose during which the new
A principal character in "The 'Cremieux Decree was brought up The Book of Splendor — Basic h i n rt oductory essay reviews the Bible.
I ngs ".t lig
ia ble. The abundant Anf:cit
is ory of Hasidism and corn-
light on thede-
ni shed a
Fratricides" was the Jewish and one of the men said he would Readings from the Kabbalah,"
t n d er spiiitual life in Me-
-
--
m
tu
ents
on
the
movement's
litera-
velocPe
doctor, Hassid, whose father give native JeWs..French citizen: edited by Gershom M: Scholem.
iods of the Canaan-
giddo in the periods
giddo
doctrines. Recognizing ites and the Israelites.
and grandfather were born in ; ship but "would have been more Dr. Scholem, professor of
i
o
Israeli
settlers came
neete
Algeria, who passionately sought -,selective." And another comment- mysticism at the Hebrew Uni- the inevitable contradictions in to Inourpr
continue
unee etsi lee r sc haani rcii.
the
a way of averting strife_ among : was that Cremieux' name. was versify in Jerusalem, is one of the movement he declares: "Nev- of snetetlenrnts of our a
Kibbutz, Kib-
Megiddo
n
d
e
d
ert
teless
Hasidism
r
e
m
a
i
n
s
'
fou
b
Isaac
"but
he
called
himself
the
most
noted
authorities
on
brothers in Algeria, who was :
Shaar Ha Eni
L the - subject of the Kabbalah. In 1 asically Judaism in its particu- nr butz
eeeasrtattie s ancient Megiddoa. n iriii)ir :vra s
motivated by a sense of justice I 1.Adalphe."
li h tl. eithye connection with

i this book he reviews the history aristic
e t
and universalistic as-
and therefore consented to head ! Whereupon another asked if de . of the Zohar, its origin and pri. ci , biit its peculiar flavor lies this anciene
t
the PPPP (Partisand of the ' - Gaulle was - a JeW and the res- , • - includes
Translation of . Hebrew column.
tss elevation into prominence
c e in his
Published by Brith Ivrith Olarnit4,
Program of the Policies of th e_ : ponse was that 'be isn't "but he's au th orship, .
<.'tJerusalem.
:selections some of the fables and
President), and who was shot 'always
-
thick
iic c wi '
ways een pre ,y.
legends of the Zohar as they
in cold blood by an OAS squad thein. Look at Debre' — Pompi- !relate to the Five Books of
T
T • ""
in the courtyard of the clinic - dou.,, That's when the question
Moses.
established by his family.
; was raised whether Madame de ;
Prof. Scholem thus explains
'lbwn
Dr. David' Hassid was moti- Gaulle's a Jew, and the reply his selections:
"What
vated primarily by a desire to was "that's Madame Mendes- tempted to present is a I sequence
have at
serve his fellow men, not to France."
-rbt7t71
nizn tr7.3Fp
of passages which might be ex-
ii7pp
* * *
permit his duties as a doctor to '
peeled to arouse an imMediate
deter him from ministering to . Thus the tragedy continued, interest in the reader
ni-rprp
1 P 07? krli"?z71
by the
Algerians as well as to French, with its prejudices, with its ha- • colorfulness with .which the life
z,npatz?
nitOt 14t4.7?4 1 TtP
and the French partisans ex- treds, with the bloodshed that of the soul is pictured, by the
acted vengeance for his having took so many innocent lives. curious poignancy of scriptural
vntp
7
XI:pr.=
rendered medical services to
Algerians, regardless of their . One of the most moving por- exegesis, by the - outright para-
nipnn
tbm.14
tions
of
the
entire
Edelman
nov-
doxicalityr
of
the
thoUghts
as-
ti4,47-
rrrrij
ppn
iry-Tpri
political views.
el is his description of the calm- serted."
*
*
*
.
n.,44pp
His daughter, Eliane, was ness and the realism with which :
;17)7 7r7Pri77 . 1177 I L?P
married to one of the leaders of Dr. Hassid faced his captors. One
Leo W. Schwarz has gained a
romlnn
41 ?r,V.1;1
the OAS. It was an unhappy • would have imagined that his place of honor among antholo-
marriage, and the love affair convincing arguments would have gists. His "Memoirs of My
nyypr.)n
nr_pr
T
ilp
nkt
ri4t7 r1 tg
that developed later between led to greater fairness if not to People — Jewish Self-Portraits
Eliane and de Pre, who came mercy.
' from the 11th to the 20th Cen-
nil
.T14'?.;147
.r1 `'L?k.clt.)4. 141.7 ? 1 -Titn 71
71'?
I
to Algeria as a barbouze, as a
Juries,
" one of the new paper-
counter-revolutionary F r e n c h ! A Jewish reader also will won- backs, is a veritable collection
/17 nr_. Titg ibrpp
lz;0;
government agent, becomes a , der why there should be preju-
vital part in the serious drama. ' dice among Arabs against JeWs of literary treasures.
I L2P n 7
ni"47. 177
Martin Buber's "My Road to
nr1P
Eliane, after her father's i whose sense of fair play was so
well evidenced by a Dr. Hassid,
41
tr'14P3
nnx
onr)
t?
death, returns to France to join
riTItP4
•of whom there must have been Jewish Body Will
her two children. Meanwhile
1 2tg
nItti7
z7 tg
Robert du Pre goes to a priest many
in Algeria.
the Jews

did emerge
among Yet
the worst
suf. Increase Assistance
to ask that a Mass be said for
ninittir!rip
the soul of David Hassid, while , ferers in the Algerian struggle to Algerian Refugees
niipp
117;7
he himself lights a candle be- f°1. freedom.
,121-)
.
1pr
.
).
nr)pn,t)4
amain
rlY1174
LONDON (JTA)—The Jewish
fore proceeding to his final ' Maurice Edelman's "The Frat-
goal in the French official ricides" is one of the very great Colonization Association re-
'71r1
P.F? 171Y
novels of our time. It is in ported that it had decided to
fight against the OAS.
assume
a
larger
share
of
the
its very essence a most power-
P'.?tPL:Ptt,
;•ypp ixtr4i
1");
* * * .
IVPri L? ,n1Tv
responsibility with Br i t i s
ful appeal for social justice,
French
and
American
Jewish
' 7rp nInitt,r);:tri
Dr. Hassid died while reciting
. -11;7? - 5p)
—P. S.
the "Shema." Throughout the welfare agencies for housing for
Tz,
;
rnp.
tn
1n17 .1-.3,
nimi • tr1t,t,
story his Jewish heritage be- Jewish Home for Aged the influx of Algerian Jews now
residing in France.
conies evident. He recalls many
,
-
.rirpntz:,4
Tir)
77:4;7
11.7tti-
rnip
i.ro.,72
1z3 ,;714r)1
.
The Council expressed satis-
incidents of Jewish influences in Dedicated in Brazil
RIO DE JANEIRO, . (JTA) — faction with the "appreciable re-
his family background.
trj71 •71.1 .7-rpri7.117r1 '11).4 '7`''7 n;-3'? 1/4 11r.) , trpr.1
The Loi Cremieux — the With city, state and medical offi- sults" being achieved through
rip;17)17 -r47
Cremieux Decree for equal rights dais in attendance, Jewish and the housing fund which was set
Iten i 7 1 rit:; I1z,r12 riT;TDY?
for Jews in Algeria—is recalled, non-Jewish, the new Home for up in 1962 in cooperation with
but the OAS ridicules it and the the Jewish Aged was officially the Central British Fund, the
• nkt, r)7 1'7 ,nrlitrj
OrrIpL ,Piv
bias injected against the Algeri- ' dedicated here. Costing $250,000, Fonds Social Juif Unifie and the
Jr-2? ritt.iri.?,) 1
gn fight for independence finds j the Home has a capacity of 300. Joint Distribution Committee. •

Megiddo

iv1.:rrat
• : • rerzem

r171.-rpri

..-r7;-T1 Z

1-)44ronro rriprTin

?41?. .;r1 .,
r37:1471,;

n''!'?It4r

4p.tg

r4
.07.775,

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