100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

February 15, 1963 - Image 25

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1963-02-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Jewish Meals

By Mildred Grosberg Bellin

(Copyright, 1963,
Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.)

TURNIPS AND LAMB

The Maimonides Medical Society Women's Auxiliary will
hold its annual donor luncheon to benefit medical philanthro-
pies, including scholarships and research, on March 26 at the
Sheraton-Cadillac Hotel. Highlighting the affair will be a fashion
show and prizes. Planning the event are, from left, (standing)
Mesdames Irving Edgar, committee on committees; George
Blum, telephone; Michael Levin, tributes; Murray Kling, tele-
phone; (seated) Victor Horvitz, hospitality; and Jack Warner,
constitution.

Judges Kent and Pernick in
Race for Re-Election Monday

Keen interest is being shown
in the campaign for re-election
now being conducted by Common
Pleas Court Judges George D.
Kent and Joseph Pernick.
The two judges are up for
renomination at the Primaries
on Monday.

JUDGE GEORGE D. KENT

Judges Kent and Pernick were
honored at community " dinners
by hosts of friends who are urg-
ing their 're-election.
Judge Kent, of 18047 Prest,
was appointed to the Common
Pleas Bench July 9, by Governor
Swainson.
.
Prior to his appointment,
Judge Kent was head of the
prosecuting attorney's homicide
division. He had been with the
prosecuting attorney's office for
13 years.
A native Detroiter, Judge
Kent attended Northern High
School, Wayne State University

daughter at 18300 Greenlawn. He
is a graduate of Highland Park
High, Michigan State University
County Prosecutor Samuel H.
Olsen and -many of his assistant
prosecuting attorneys. Also at-
tending were Judges Charles S.
Farmer and Pernick.
The dinner was headlined by
toastmaster Lou Gordon, a
WXYZ news commentator who
praised Judge Ken't judicial
qualifications and discussed the
questions of whether the pro-
posed new state constitution is
an improve 1. 1 - lent over Michi-
gan current document.
A7 throng of :nearly 300 per-
sons paid tribute to Kent at a
testimonial dinner held Satur-
day. The guests -included -Wayne
and the University of Wisconsin,
where, tie eaped his law degree.
He is a member of the law firm
of Pernick, Dingell and Zemmol,
w h is h includes Congressman
John D. Dingell.
He is a member of the Jewish
War Veterans, Eddie Jacobson
Bnai Brith Lodge, serves on the
regional Bnai Brith Anti-Defa-
mation League advisory board,
is a member of Perfection Ma-
sonic Lodge, is sovereign prince
of Carson Council of Scottish
Rites and is active in the Bagley
Community Council.

Blanche Parent Wise
Candidate for Council

Blanche Parent Wise again is
a candidate in the Feb. 18 pri-
mary for the Detroit Common
Council on which she served two
four-year terms beginning in
1953.
Married to John A. Wise, the
mother of five children and
grandmother of seven, Mrs. Wise
has served on a number .of im-
portant Wayne County commit-
tees as well as her service for
the city. In addition, she has
been a survey team member for
the U. S. Government and served
on a study tour of West Germany
at the invitation of that country.
Among her many affiliations is
the Women's Committee of De-
troit Round Table of Catholics,
Protestants and Jews.

John V. Healy in Race
for Common Council

JUDGE JOSEPH PERNICK

and the Detroit College of Law.

He is a member of Congrega-
tion Ahavas Achim, Mosaic Lodge
F. & A. M., Bnai Brith and the
William. P. Tutro Post VFW.
He is married and has two
teen-age daughters.
Judge Pernick, who was ap-
pointed to the Bench by Gover-
nor Swainson last November, re-
sides with his wife and infant

This article has a double pur-
pose. The first is to show what
lovely things happen when tur-
nips • are wedded to lamb. By
themselves turnips are scarcely
the most popular of vegetables.
but when simmered with .meat,
they not only impart a fine
flavor, but take on some of the
meat's good taste. The complet-
ed dish is delicious, whether it
be a simple stew with a pretty
name, such as the Navarin, or
the more complicated Lamb
Ragout which is an example of
the cuisine introduced into _Is-
rael from North Africa.
The second purpose is to dis-
cuss briefly coriander and
cumin, seasonings used in the
Ragout. Among the many bless-
ings we are receiving from the
creation of Israel is a reintro-
duction to foods we stopped eat-
ing during the centuries of our
sojourn in the more northern
countries of Europe. Ever so
many good things we had con-
sidered completely un - Jewish
are really a part of our own
early heritage, and among these
are many of the spices. Cumin,
native to the countries around
the Mediterranean, is a corn
monly used ingredient in Orien-
tal Jewish cooking. Coriander,
we are told, was eaten by the
ancient Hebrews even in the.
days of Moses. It has a pleasant
taste, somewhat like a combin-
ation of lemon and sage. Since
in taste and appearance the
Lamb Ragout is different from
our usual way of cooking, it is
a good dish to select on a day
when we want to give our
menus a touch of novelty. Only
families with very adventurous
tastes like this sort of food
every day. However, it is also
true that as we become accus-
tomed to the newer flavors, we
can use dishes- of this type more
and more in our menus.

NAVARTN
3 lbs. boneless shoulder of lamb
4 tablespoons vegetable oil
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
salt and pepper to taste
2 cups canned tomato sauce
2 medium cloves garlic, minced
1 bay leaf
4 medium turnips, peeled and
quartered
14 teaspoon rosemary or thyme
3 medium onions, peeled and
quartered
6 medium carrots, • peeled and
quartered

Have the meat cut into 2-inch
cubes. Heat half the oil in a heavy
4-quart saucepan, and brown the
meat in it over medium-high heat.
Cook one layer of meat at a time,
and brown well. Pour out any • fat
remaining in the pan. Sprinkle the
flour, salt and pepper over the
meat, and stir to blend. Add the
tomato sauce, garlic, bay leaf, and
rosemary or thyme. Bring to a boil,
then lower the heat to simmer, cover
the pan, and cook for one hour. Stir
occasionally to be sure the meat is
not sticking. At the end of 45 min-
utes, heat the remaining oil in a
small saucepan, and in it brown the
turnips, onions, and carrots, a few
at a time. Add the vegetables to
the meat and continue cooking until
all are tender, about 30 minutes
longer. Skim any fat from the sur-
face. This amount serves 6 to 7.
LAMB RAGOUT, ISRAELI STYLE
3 lbs. boneless shoulder of lamb
1 teaspoon salt
-1 /4 teaspoon each saffron and
paprika
11/2 tablespoons ground coriander
1 teaspoon sugar
A pinch each of black and
cayenne pepper
1 large clove garlic, minced
4 medium turnips, peeled and
sliced
2 medium carrots, peeled and
sliced
6 medium onions, peeled and
sliced
1 green pepper, seeded and
sliced
1 2-1b. 3-oz. can tomatoes
1 /4 cup seedless raisins
1 1-1b. 4-oz. can chick peas
1 /4 cup olive or vegetable oil
Have the meat cut into 11/2-inch
cubes. Combine the salt, saffron,
paprika, coriander, cumin, and black
and cayenne pepper. Roll each cube
in this mixture. Heat the oil in a
heavy 4-quart saucepan, and brown
the meat well over medium heat.
Remove the meat, and in the same
oil brown the garlic, turnips, car-
rots, onions, and green pepper for
5 minutes. Return the meat to the
pan and add the tomatoes and
raisins. Bring to a boil, lower the
heat to simmer, cover the pan, and
cook until the meat is very tender,
about 1 1/2 hours. Drain the chick
peas and add. Heat thoroughly, re-
move any fat from the surface, and
serve garnished with parsley. If de-
sired, the gravy may be thickened
with 2 tablespoons of flour mixed
to a paste with a little -cold water.
This amount serves 6-7.

John V. Healy, native Detroit-
er and general insurance agent
for 15 years, seeks a seat on
Detroit's Common Council.
His school affiliations include
University of Detroit High School
and Michigan State University.
He is a past president of the
Old Corktown Club, a board
member of the University of De-
troit High School Alumni, a
member of the Knights of Co-
lumbus and a past director of
Share in America—buy U.S.
the North End Businessmen's
Savings Bonds.
Association.

Vaughn Seeks Seat on Common Council •

Jackie Vaughn III seeks elec-ICouncil and a former aide to
tion to Detroit's Common Coun- State Chairman Neil Staebler
cil. He is a past president and and Highway Commissioner John
president emeritus of State C. Mackie. He was also appoint-
Young Democrats, a precinct ed by the Governor as executive
delegate and past president of secretary of the Michigan State
the 15th Congressional District Athletic Commission.
Young Dems.
One may sometimes acquire
Vaughn is a graduate of Hills-
dale College, Oberlin College and eternal life in an hour.
— Abodah Zarah 17.
Oxford University, E n g 1 a n d,
where he was president of the
Oxford University American Stu-
dents Association. He was a Ful-
bright scholar and fellow and
Agency
taught social science at Wayne
20 ORCHESTRAS
State University.
One to Suit Every Occasion
Vaughn is a past president of WO
UN 4-4346
2-4814
the Trade Union Leadership Fox Bldg.

Dave Diamond

Panackia Is Candidate
for Common Council

Joseph Panackia, Jr., a Detroit
builder for 18 years and secre-
tary-treasurer of Thomas Built
Homes, is a candidate for a Com-
mon Council seat on the non-
partisan ballot.
The father of four children, he
attended Walsh Institute and
Wayne State University. He also
is Navy veteran of World War
II. Panackia, 19201 Greydale,
has pledged to combat juvenile
delinquency through youth ac-
tivity programs.

rfx.xx.x:x.x:, ,K.xywKx4cx.e
1.7i PLASTIC FURNITURE 0
<1

COVERS

,.•4

fr: .

.

f$ -.,.

MADE TO ORDER
or READY MADE

PRINCETON SHOP

SEVEN MILE at EVERGREEN

KE 3-4310

Elegant Bar Mitzvah Suits
With The ROYAL Fit



and ENTERTAINMENT

BY

HAL GORDON

UN 3-5730
UN 3-8982

'....

CALL ANNA KARBAL "i:'
A LI 2-0874 m
nirCK:Z*N77Z€K- f - ::;•:+7.<:X#XX*- 27.2xi:

• CANDIDS
• BLACK & WHITE

6 to 60

For Young Men



LI 8-1116
LI 8-2266

• MOVIES
• COLOR

HOLLYWOOD - METHOD

UNWANTED HAIR REMOVED—PERMANENTLY, SAFELY

Special Technique for Sensitive Men and Women
FACE — ARMS — LEGS — HAIRLINES CORRECTED
EYEBROWS ARCHED PERMANENTLY

HELEN ZINBERG, R. E.

8221 CURTIS

cor.

ROSELAWN

UN 2-8914

We Make Our Own Glasses

HEADQUARTERS FOR

• LATEST DOMESTIC AND IM-
PORTED FRAME FASHIONS

• PRESCRIPTIONS FOR GLASSES
ACCURATELY FILLED

• Immediate Repair

• Reasonably Priced

ROSEN OPTICAL - SERVICE

13720 W. -9 MILE nr. COOLIDGE

LI 7-5068

OAK PARK, MICH.

Hours: Daily & Sat. 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m.; Wednesdays to 12:30;
Thursdays to 9 p.m.

BOESKY'S

COCKTAIL LOUNGE, DINING ROOM, COFFEE SHOP
PIANO BAR, BANQUET MURAL ROOM AVAILABLE

JAMES COUZENS AT GREENFIELD

Featuring:


Lunch
Breakfast
DINNER and
AFTER THEATRE SNACKS

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

:BOWLERS • COME DRESSED AS YOU IARE!

HARRY BOESKY

Your Host

AmPle
Free
Paiking

BR 2-0644

MAIN ENTRANCE ION GREENFIELD,



25 -- THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS — Friday, February 15, 1963

Medical Philanthropies Will Benefit
from Maimonides Auxiliary Donor

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan