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February 01, 1963 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1963-02-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UN Gets Proposals to Ban Prejudice

1. A preamble which would in-
clude "reference to the fact that re-
ligious intolerance can lead to and
has led to discrimination and vio-
lence."
2. A statement indicating that
propagation of "incitatory hatred of
a religious group" is to be forbidden.
3. A call upon all governments to
discontinue all administrative prac-
tices which involve discrimination or
unequal t r e a t m e n t on religious
grounds, urging the governments to
pin down these prohibitions through
appropriate domestic legislation. •
4. Member states should be obli-
gated to withhold financial aid, li-
cense privileges or any other form of
assistance to any private organiza-
tions which deny equality of treat-
ment to one or another religious
group.
Member states should
obligate
themselves "to take action to bring
about the cessation of the propaga-
tion in public of that form of reli-
gions intolerance that is calculated
to lead to discrimination or violence
against a religious group."

Another memorandum pre-
sented to the Subcommission,
urging the group to continue
studying possible steps for the
protection of minorities and the
elimination of other forms of
discrimination, was introduced
by six organizations, including
the CBJO and the World Jewish
Congress. The WJC also holds
consultative status before the
Subcommission.
In his attack, Ivanof re-
ferred once more, as he had
done earlier, to data in the
Ingles report furnished by the
Coordinating Board of Depu-
ties of British Jews. He had
also objected to the insistence
on the right of persons to
leave for family reunification
voiced before the body earlier
by Dr. Meir Rosenne, Israel's
observer and special repre-
sentative to the Subcommis-
sion.
The entire Ingles report plus
its guiding principles now goes
to the Subcommission's parent
body, the UN Commission on
Human Rights, which' will meet
in March in Geneva. Before they
become fully effective, the
Ingles report and the guiding
principles must be adopted by
the Economic and Social Coun-
cil and, finally, by the General
Assembly.
The 12-member UN Subcom-
mission on Prevention of Dis-
crimination . on Monday started
consideration of a draft declara-

tion on the elimination of all
forms of racial bias.
Originally, the Subcommission
was to discuss not only racial
but also religious discrimination.
However, under pressure from
delegations from a number of
under-developed countries that
are primarily interested in elim-
ination of racial discrimination,
the problem of racial bias was
taken up as a separate item, with
the problem of religious discrim-
ination to follow.
The Soviet delegation also fa-
vored such separation because it
expects strong charges against
the Soviet treatment of Jews and
hopes that the issue of religious
discrimination would not reach
the Subcommission at its pres-
ent session, which must conclude
on Feb. 1. Jewish organizations
have prepared data on the sup-
pression of Jewish religion in
the Soviet Union and other
forms of anti-Jewish discrimina-
tion practiced in the USSR for
argumentation at the Subcom-
mission if the subject of re-
ligious discrimination is taken
up.
The draft declaration on the
elimination of all forms of ra-
cial discrimination was proposed
jointly by representatives of
Italy, France, Chile and Poland.
It is composed of the following
articles:

Bank Deposits
of Victims to Be
Revealed by Swiss

JERUSALEM (JTA)—A re-
cently adopted Swiss law, ord-
ering banks in Switzerland to
disclose the names of holders
of secret accounts identified
until now only by coded num-
bers, will go into effect about
April 10, the Israel Foreign
Ministry announced.
The Ministry made the an-
nouncement in reply to inquiries
by Israeli residents as to the
date when they might apply to
Swiss banks for the disclosures
authorized by the new law. Jew-
ish organizations that h a•v e
pressed for the adoption of the
new Swiss law have claimed
there may be valuables and
money amounting to hundreds
of millions of dollars in Swiss
banks, deposited there by Jews
who had fled the -Nazi- regime .
during World War II, who had
perished during the Nazi holo-
caust.
When the identity of the
original depositors is revealed,
heirs will be in a position to
claim the money or valuables.
The Ministry requested persons
concerned not to file claims
until the law becomes effective
and means for implementing
the new law are made public
by Swiss authorities.

Israel's Interior
Minister Dissolves
Beersheba Council

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to The Jewish News)

JERUSALEM—Interior Min-
ister Moshe Shapiro appointed
Tuesday a six-man commission
to run Beersheba until
a new municipal government
is elected.
The move follows a decision
by the Interior Minister to dis-
solve the present town council
at the request of Mayor Zev
Zarissi.
A crisis arose last year when
Liberal Councillor Avraham
Bleischer defected from the
Mapam-led coalition to join the
Mapai opposition while Mapai
Councillor David Hacham re-
fused to give his support to
the opposition move to oust
Mayor Zarissi. The town coun-
cil, which is comprised of civil
servants, has been unable to
function since the crisis began.

Scramble to buy land, but be
deliberate in taking a wife.
Yebamoth 63

Jordanians Shoot 2 Israeli Teens

"1. Any theory of differentation
between races or racial superiority
is scientifically false, morally rep-
rehensible, socially unjust and
dangerous. Nothing can justify
racial discrimination, in theory or
in practice.
"2. Racial discrimination. in
whatever form and irrespective of
the individuals or groups against
whom it is directed, is an offense
against human dignity, a flagrant
violation of the charter of the
United Nations and a denial of
the fundamental human rights
proclaimed by the Universal Dec-
laration.
"3. Racial discrimination is a
negation of the social nature of
man, who can develop his per-
sonality to the full only through
communication with all his fellow
men. Refusal to recognize these
bonds linking all men is detrimen-
tal to the harmonious develop-
ment of every national community
and may lead to its disintegration.
"4. Racial discrimination tends
to jeopardize international peace
and security, friendly relations
among peoples and cooperation
between nations.
"5. Everyone, without distinction
tion as to race, color or ethnic
origin, has the right to take part
in the government of his country
and to participate in elections by
universal and equal suffrage. Ap-
pointment to the public service
shall be open to all citizens on
the basis of merit.
"6. Everyone has the right to
education, without distinction, ex-
clusion, limitation, preference or
segregation based on race, color,
or ethnic origin, since the purpose
of education should be the for-
mation of a harmonious society
based on full respect for human
rights and fundamental freedoms
for all.
"7. Everyone, without distinction --
as to race, color or ethnic origin,
has the right to work, to free
choice of employment, to favor-
able and just conditions of work,
remuneration and promotion, and
to social welfare and social se-
curity.
"8. Everyone shall have equal
access to any place or facility in-
tended for use by the general
public, without distinction as to
race, color or ethnic origin, and
no such distinction shall be en-
forced, permitted, encouraged or
perpetuated by any organ of
society."

JERUSALEM, (JTA) — Two
Israeli teenage boys were shot,
one seriously, when Jordanian
soldiers suddenly opened fire at
noon from the old Jerusalem
City Wall, near the Jaffa Gate.
Three school boys had crossed
the official demarcation line
between Israel and Jordan, go-
ing into the No-Man's-Land sep-
arating the two sides to pick
pottery among the ruins in the
area, when the firing began.

One of the boys, unhurt, ran
hack to the Israeli side and re-
ported his two comrades had
been wounded.
The injured boys were remov-
ed to a hospital here under
escort of United Nations mili-
tary observers. Israel immedi-
ately lodged a sharp protest
with the UN's Israel-Jordanian
Mixed Armistice Commission,
requesting an emergency meet-
ing to hear the formal com-
plaint.

WE POINT THE WAY TO
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Morris B. Abram, representa-
tive of the United States, sub-
mitted a second draft declara-
tion. Emphasizing the desire of
the U.S. "to give effect . to the
principle of equality of all men
and all peoples without distinc-
tion as to race, color, or re-
ligion," as stated in the United
Nations Charter, he suggested
the following principles as a
guide for legislation and prac-
tice:

"1. No state shall make any
distinction in the treatment of
persons on the grounds of race or
ethnic origin, nor shall it make
any distinction in the right to
citizenship on such grounds.
"2. Everyone shall have equal
access to any place or facility in-
tended for use by the general
public, without distinction as to
race or ethnic origin, and no such
distinction shall be enforced, en-
couraged, perpetuated or per-
mitted by any agency of any state.
"3. Everyone, without distinction
as to race or ethnic origin, shall
have the right to take part in the
government of his country and to
participate in elections through
universal and equal suffrage. Ap-
pointment to the public service
shall be open to all citiens, on
the basis of merit.
..._ "4. Everyone has the right to
an effective remedy, through in-
dependent and impartial tribunals,
for any discrimination he may
suffer on the grounds of race, or
ethnic origin with respect to his
fundamental rights and freedoms.''

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Friday, February 1, 19 63

(Continued from Page 1)
by Judge Ingles, a member of
the 12-man subcommission act-
ing as special rapporteur. His
entire report was adopted, again
with Ivanov attacking some of
Judge Ingles' data on the
grounds that it was "non-objec-
tive and provocative."
The Coordinating Board o f
Jewish Organizations represent
ing Bnai Brith and the Boar d
of Deputies of British Jews sub
mitted a memorandum to the
UN Subcommission on Preven
tion of Discrimination propos
ing a draft for a UN convention
to obligate member nations to
wipe out religious bias.
The Subcommission will send
the proposals on to the full
Commission, scheduled to hold
its next session in Geneva, in
March.
The Subcommission has on
its agenda consideration of
two separate conventions, one
dealing with racial discrimin-
ation and the other with re-
ligious discrimination. How-
ever, since the anti-bias unit
is scheduled to conclude its
three weeks of sessions by
Friday, it was certain that no
debate on religious discrimin-
ation would be held this
year. The 12-member group,
which spent almost two of its
three weeks debating and
finally adopting a set of prin-
ciples dealing with the right
of everyone to leave or re-
turn to his own country, is
now discussing racial dis-
crimination.
Proposing that the Human
Rights Commission adopt a
declaration calling for "the
elimination of all forms of re-
ligious intolerance," the CBJO
suggested these points for in-
clusion in the declaration:

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