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January 25, 1963 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1963-01-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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-

,

Role of Windsor Jewry in Rescuing 'War
Orphans Described in 'Redeemed Children'

An historic chapter of one of
the important rescue movemen is
that followed the last war is r e-
corded in a volume that mu st
now be reckoned as part of th e
valuable literature relating to
the holocaust and to the perpet u-
ation of factual informatio n
about the catastrophe that a
flitted mankind.
Ben Lappin, now a memo er
of the faculty of the school of
social work of the University of
Toronto, writes authoritativel y
about the bringing into Canad a
in 1947 of 1,116 war orphans an d
their preparation for a whol e-
some life in their new enviro n-
ment. Formerly associated wit h
the Canadian Jewish. Congres s,
he is well informed on Canadia n
Jewish communal activities, an d
his book, "The Redeemed Chi I-
dren," published by the Unive r-
sity of Toronto Press, gives a
thorough account of the war or
phans' rescue.
They were settled in a num
her of Canadian communities
and 25 of them came to Wind
sor. An interesting episode i s
related about the communit y
neighboring Detroit:

"The impact that the young
immigrants made on smaller
localities is vividly conveyed
in this excerpt from a letter
by a lay leader describing the
reception of a first contingent
of European youth: 'When we
got off the train at Windsor
and found that a few hundred
people had gathered to meet
the kids, there was no holding
our people down. They took
the kids shopping and, when
they ran out of community
money, they dipped freely into
their own pocket-books. It was
an emotional "binge" that
rocked the whole community
for two or three days since
these children were the first
contact with the remnants of
the destroyed European Jew-
ish community'."

Zim Reports Hike In Atlantic Voyagers

NEW YORK, (JTA) — Pas-
senger liners of the Zim Israel
Navigation Co. in trans-Atlantic
fear and suspicion in her for service between New York,
other neople by telling what Mediterranean ports and Israel
they did to her father?' One ran with an average of 89 per
young man, a highly trained cent of their berths occupied
professional, simply could not during 1962, it was reported by
make up his mind whether he the American-Israeli Shipping
would or would not tell his Company U. S. representatives
children about the concentra- of the Zim Lines.
A total of 11,258 passengers
tion camns. He tried to bal-
ance the likely consequences were carried on 18 round voy-
of either course of action. He ages made by the S. S. Israel

scholastic ranking, gaining 89 1
marks out of a possible 1,00 0
in exams.
Many of those who were set
tied in Canada made their mark s
in business and professions •
What are the implications of the
holocaust, of the Khurban, and
what are the present reactions
of- those who were among the
rescued children? Here is a re-
vealing report in Prof. Lappin's wondered aloud what the
book:
other members of the war or-

"Those members of the
group who showed an inclina-
tion to discuss their situa-
tions freely were asked
whether they planned to tell
their children of the experi-
ences they had been through
under the Nazis. Invariably
their responses revealed much
bafflement and conflict. 'I'd
like to tell them,' one individ-
ual replied, 'but I'm sure my
children won't understand. Not
even my wife can understand.
All they will probably be able
to do is give me sympathy, so
why embarrass them and my-
self? I'll probably not say
anything about it to them.'
Another said: 'Sure my daugh-
ter should know what her
father went through. But • I
don't know if I should tell her.
She's four years old now and
everybody she speaks to seems
so nice. Why should I awaken

Zuckerman Issues
Progress Report of
Atlantic Utilities

phan group were doing about
this problem. His Canadian-
born wife, who was sitting in
on the conversation, inter-
jected that it did not much
matter one way or another
what the parents thought; they
would in any event have to
tell their children about the
experience under Hitler. She
was asked why. She looked at
her - husband and spoke as
though surprised that an im-
portant detail had slipped his
mind. Because our three-year-
old often comes to me with a
crayon asking me to put num-
bers on his arm like his Daddy
has'."

and S. S. Zion and two round
voyages by the S. S. Jerusalem
during the 12 months. The total
for the same number of voyages
in 1961 was 10,857 passengers.
The Zim Lines' world-wide pas-
senger carryings reached the
80,000 mark in 1962, a 23 per
cent increase over the previous
year.

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Pottifititati et, Evrttaftlan





IF YOU'RE - PLANNING A TRIP, CONSULT BUD AND ELLIOTT SCHUBINER'S

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ginaw

Of

There were mounting difficul-
ties involving the orphans' edu-
cation, training for trades where
necessary, their upkeep, their
recreational needs. There were
some genuine triumphs for many
of the children, as indicated in
a quotation from a Montreal
newspaper story headed "D.P.
Also Means Deft Pupil," de-
scribing how one of these or-
phans earned top ten high school

tml

0,4
ar

4' 4

SHERWOOD AUTO SERVICE

Five hundred group and in-
dependent tours are scheduled
to Israel thus far for 1963. These
are noted in the enclosed "List
of Tours Featuring Israel No.
14." Included in this list are 441
group tours, 43 independent
tours and 16 cruises.
In an effort to encourage
more tourism to Eilat during
the winter months, the Eilat
Tourist Bureau, Arki Inland
Airlines and several hotels are
cooperating in a cost-saving pro-
gram.

-3

tri

This is evidence of the real-
ism of Prof. Lappin's conclu-
sion that: "The troubled, inde-
cisive answers of the former
refugee youths are characteristic
of the Jewish community as a
whole when the discussion turns
to Nazi atrocities. In the absence
of intellectual leadership to help
the individual understand and
gain a perspective on this prob-
lem, it has become a kind of
taboo." He envisions a "thank-
less job" for the writers who
will set out to "confront a people
with a supremely painful mem-
ory." His book serves a valuable
purpose both in evaluating a
great act of mercy and in re-
taining the memory of the

500 Tours Scheduled
for Israel During '63

1

O

He who marries a woman for
her money shall have unseemly
children. Kiddushin 114

Announcement has just been
made that the Florida Railroad
and Public Utilities Commission
has granted a rate increase of
ANY MODEL AS LOW AS
approximately 30 per cent to
Includes:
Atlantic Utilities Corp., of which
Clutches
Seals
Paul Zuckerman, of Detroit, is
Gaskets
chairman.
Oil Rings and
Labor
In a progress report issued khurban.
this week it has been announced
An enlightening foreword to
that Atlantic Utilities has agreed the book by Saul Hayes, execu-
Having evaded the calamity
.
:
tive vice-president of the Cana-
that befell their families and the
dian Jewish Congress, adds merit
Free Pick-Up
20522 LIVERNOIS near 8 MILE RD.
Jewish people, the 1,116 were
and Delivery
to the discussion aroused in
UN 2-2200 or UN 2-9714
brought to Canada after the Jew-
Prof. Lappin's study.
s- riMirinrybrnbar6/51121/51MS/mnnmsinnyliblr6-615151Mslrt?
ish community had succeeded in
securing government approval.
Then began a period of many
trials and tribulations. The chil-
dren had come from environ-
ments in which they were forced
to live in hiding, to fight for
crusts of bread, to be suspicious
of people because of the lurking
dangers.
First settled in private homes,
they often had to be. transferred
to paid foster homes. Yet, many
retained affections for the early
homes, and the cases that in-
volved mental conflicts were
rare.
Through the Canadian Jew-
PAUL ZUCKERMAN
ish Congress, the United Jewish
Relief and the War Relief Agen- to service two residential devel-
cies of Canada, with the assist- opments of American Realty &
ance of the JDC, the task of Petroleum with both water and
rescuing and rehabilitating the gas. Construction will involve
1,116 orphans -proceeded with an outlay of more than $12,000,-
understanding a n d devotion. 000 over a several-year period
Prof. Lappin's "The Redeemed for building gas and water lines,
Children" is a genuine tribute and more than 30,000 houses are
to a great community.
involved.
There were frustrations in
Zuckerman is president of Vel-
the process of the rescue ac- vet Peanut Products Corp. here.
tivities. There was a waiting He is one of the outstanding na-
period from the time of the tional United Jewish Appeal
kids'—as they are referred to leaders and was last year's chair-
—selection and their arrival in man of the Detroit Allied Jewish
Canada. There were problems Campaign.

involving the participating
communities. Windsor Jewry
at that time numbered 2,330—
less than half its present Jew-
ish population. Its representa-
tives served well on the over-
all coordinating committeee.

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