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November 02, 1962 - Image 35

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1962-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Women s Cluhs

(More Clubs Page 23)

HOME RELIEF SOCIETY
will meet 12:30 p.m. today at
the home of Mrs. Max Miller,
19187 Santa Barbara. A dessert
luncheon will be served. Plans
will be completed for the Nov.
13 donor luncheon. For infor-
mation, call Mrs. S. Goldman,
UN 2-0761.

* * *

MISHKAN ISRAEL SISTER-
HOOD will meet 8:30 p.m. Mon-
day at the synagogue, 14000 W.
Nine Mile. Hyman Horowitz, pop-
ular singer of Jewish and Hebrew
Songs, accompanied by Mrs.
Louis Dzodin, will entertain. A
social hour will follow. The
public is invited.
* * *
WOMEN'S ORTHODOX
LEAGUE will begin its educa-
tional program with a film
shown by a doctor from the
American Cancer Association 9
p.m. Monday at the home of
Mrs. A. Lobel, 4087 W. Buena
Vista. Mrs. A. Gold will be co-
hostess. Refreshments will be
served. Final plans for the Dec.
2nd dinner will be discussed.
▪ * 11,
DETROIT WOMEN OF
ALPHA OMEGA will hold a
luncheon - meeting 12:15 p.m.
Tuesday at the Impressario Res-
taurant. "Opera In Focus" will
be presented. Mrs. Rhoda Rosin,
chairman, announces that
friends are invited.
* *
SISTERHOOD of TEMPLE
BETH EL will present Rabbi
Philip Frankel, of Lansing, at
its Nov. 6 meeting. Rabbi Fran-
kel will review the book, "Let-
ting Go," by Philip Roth.
* * *
BRITH SHOLOM LADIES
AUXILIARY will hold a games
party 7:30 p.m. Sunday at the
Jericho Temple, 18495 Wyo-
ming. Friends are invited. The
proceeds will go to charity.
* *
JUNIOR PRIMROSE CLUB
will meet Monday at the home
of Gloria Stasofsky, 20512 Pier-
son, announces President Mrs.
Stanley Stalburg.

OAK PARK NSHEI CH,.kBAD
will meet 2:30 p.m. Saturday
at the home of Mrs. Feldman,
24241 Dante, according to Mrs.
A. Sandweiss, chairman.
* * *
SIGMA ALPHA MU MOTH-
ERS' ALUMNAE GROUP, Iota
Chapter of the University of
Michigan, has elected Mrs.
Victor Blizer as president. Of-
ficers include Mesdames Ed-
ward Rothenberg, vice-presi-
dent; Peter Altman, treasurer;
Irving Goldsmith, Harold Sha-
pero, David Tann, secretaries.
Mrs. Daniel Siegel is honorary
president. Mrs. Harry Gross-
man is outgoing president.

Israeli Warships
Are Participating in
French Maneuvers

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to The Jewish News)

PARIS — Three Israeli war-
ships were disclosed Tuesday to
be visiting the French port of
Toulon and to be participating
in naval maneuvers with the
French fleet.
The squadron consists of the
destroyers Eilat and Jaffa and
the frigate Haifa. During their
two week stay in French ports,
the three warships will take
part in a number of maneuvers
while Admiral Benun, the Is-
raeli Navy chief, will visit
French naval and army installa-
tions.
Benun was received aboard
the French flagship Jean Bart
and visited the French naval
school in the southern district.
He also watched a demonstra-
tion of firing of ground rockets
at the Moquese Naval Base. He
and members of his staff visited
the French Center for Space
and Nuclear Research and were
later entertained by the French
naval staff at a dinner on the
Jean Bart.
The frigate Haifa is the for-
mer Egyptian ship, the Ibrahim
El Awad, which was captured
by the Israelis in 1956 during
the Suez campaign. The Eilat
and Jaffa each displace 1,710
* * *
tons and have a complement
NORTHWEST NSHEI CHA- of 250 officers and men. They
BAD will meet 2:30 p.m. Satur- are fully armed.
day at the hoMe of Mrs. Michel
Even a fool, if he keeps sil-
Bagley, 18000 Roselawn. David
Bagley will speak, according to ence, is thought wise.—Proverbs
Mrs. Tzippora Baiter, chairman. 17.

*

.

By
love the rich flavor find the ef-
MILDRED GROSBERG BELLIN fort involved all part of the fun.

(Copyright, 1962,
Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.)

For many a lover of good food
the artichoke is the finest and
most delicate of vegetables. And
to all lovers of artichokes the
most delectable portion is the
heart, the base of the vegetable
with the few tender leaves which
surround it.
While another, quite differ-
ent vegetable, the Jerusalem arti-
choke, bears the same name, the
one usually meant is the globe
or French artichoke, a winter
vegetable which looks like a
large thistle. Those of fine qual-
ity are round in shape with the
leaves a bright green and tight-
ly packed. The size may vary
considerably.
Artichokes have been consid-
ered a very tasty delicacy since
early times. Rich citizens of an-
cient Rome paid exhorbitant
sums for them and had laws
passed forbidding their purchase
by the poor. Their descendants
in present day Rome find the
vegetable equally delicious, and
prepare it in many ways, boiled
to be eaten hot or cold, fried,
preserved, stuffed, or cut up and
combined with other foods. One
of the best known is a twice fried
delicacy called "Artichokes, Jew-
ish Style," eloquent testimony to
their popularity among the Jew-
ish people of Italy.
While artichokes have long
been favorites in other coun-
tries surrounding the Mediter-
ranean, including • Israel, they
were almost unknown to our
people in the more northern
countries of Europe, and seemed
an oddity to them when they
were first seen here. It is only
recently that we find the arti-
chokes on the tables of western
Jewish families to any extent.
Since eating whole artichokes
is a rather complicated proced-
ure, they are frequently served
as a separate course, so the diner
may give them his full atten-
tion. After they are cooked the
leaves are removed one by one,
and only the tender, fleshy part
near the base consumed. T h e
tougher part of the leaf is
scraped with the teeth then dis-
carded. Above the heart itself
there is a fuzzy bit called "the
choke." This is also discarded.
The tender, inner leaves next to
the heart may be eaten entirely
along with • the base. Those who

However, one may if he wishes,
enjoy eating the choice artichoke
heart without all this effort.
They may be purchased p r e -
served in cans or jars, and are
also available, quartered, in
frozen form. The frozen hearts,
which most nearly resemble the
taste of the fresh vegetable, are
used most effectively in the fol-
lowing recipes.

ARTICHOKE AND
HALIBUT CASSEROLE
6 tablespoons butter
1 green pepper, diced
3 ,4 cup all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons minced dried onion
1 teaspoon salt
1 /2 teaspoon paprika
21/2 cups milk
1 /2 cup grated American cheese
2 eggs, slightly beaten
2 lbs. cooked, cubed halibut
10-oz. package frozen artichoke
hearts, cooked
2 tablespoons bread crumbs
Melt the butter in a saucepan over
medium heat, add the green pepper,
and cook until tender. Stir in the
flour, onion, salt, and paprika, and
cook until the mixture bubbles.
Gradually stir in the milk, and stir
constantly until the mixture becomes
slightly thickened. Add the cheese.
Stir a little of the sauce into the
eggs, then add them to the rest of
the sauce. Carefully fold in the fish
and artichoke hearts. Pour into a
greased 2-quart casserole or 5 indi-
vidual baking dishes. Sprinkle the
bread crumbs over the top. Bake at
35- 0 degrees F. about 20 minutes,
until thoroughly heated. This goes
well with a salad of pickled beets,
and muffins or biscuits. The recipe

Back after two successful years
in Europe

IRV FIELD

and

his

ORCHESTRA

538-5395

serves five.
ARTICHOKE HEARTS
WITH MUSHROOMS
1 /2 lb. fresh mushrooms
2 tablespoons butter or parve
margarine
1 9-oz. package frozen artichoke
hearts
Salt and pepper to taste
Wash the mushrooms and dry
thoroughly. Slice lengthwise through
cap and stem. Melt the shortening
in a medium-large skillet and add
the still-frozen artichoke hearts.
Cook over medium heat for 4 min-
utes. turn over and cook 4 minutes
longer. Separate the hearts careful-
ly as they thaw, to prevent them
from breaking. Add the mushrooms,
salt and pepper to taste, and con-
tinue cooking until tender, about 5
minutes longer. Cover the pan for
the last 2 minutes. This amount
serves four.

Center Membership

Some 650,000 person are affi-
liated with Jewish community
centers throughout the United
States.

Silence is an admission. —
The Talmud, Baba Metzia 38.

Large Selection
• SLACKS • TOP COATS
• SUITS • SPORT COATS

EXPERT ALTERATIONS
AND REMODELING ON
LADIES' AND MEN'S
CLOTHING

RADOM
Tailors, Clothiers &

- Cletners

22'155 'Coolidge, Oak 'Park

LI 7-1511

MURRAY & COMPANY
JEWELERS

19147 LIVERNOIS North of '7 Mile Rd.

CLOSING OUT ENTIRE LINE

OF FINE JEWELRY AT

2 OFF AND MORE

Shop Now while selection is Complete!

<P4-"--2-r-s2,-r••-°b"

T

Welcomes You

His New

CITIES SERVICE STATION

NOW OPEN

10100 W. NINE MILE ROAD

CORNER IF ITHACA

OAK PARK

SAM WILL BE ON HAND TO
WELCOME YOU PERSONALLY AT THE

OFFICIAL GRAND OPENING
NEXT FRIDAY, SATURDAY Cr SUNDAY
NOV. - 10 - 11

OLD WORLD BROUGHT TO PRESENT—Pillars rise from
what is almost certainly the ruins of the world's oldest known
synagogue, recently discovered near the ancient Roman port
of Ostia, 15 miles from Rome. The synagogue, dating back to
the First Century A.D., was found under a Fourth Century
synagogue, which had been discovered only a year ago.

35 -- THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS — Friday, November 2, 1962

Complicated Effort in Eating Artichokes is Fun

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