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September 14, 1962 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1962-09-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Zionist Organization of Detroit last Thursday voted a sum of $100 which
was sent immediately to the Iranian Embassy in Washington to help relieve the
sufferings of the many thousands who were made homeless by the earthquake
in Iran. Judge Ira-G. Kaufman,. ZOD president, sent a message of sympathy to
the people of Iran on behalf of the Detroit Zionists.

Detroit Zionists Send Aid
to Iran Earthquake Victims

U.S. Role in
the UN on
Middle East
and the
Arabs'
Internecine
Conflict

Dore Schary's
Boyhood
Years:
His Views
on Hyphen ism

HE JEWISH NE S



r"

NA i c

c) -r

A Weekly Review

Editorial
Page 4

Commentary
Page 2
Book Review
Page 4

I f Jewish Events

Michigan's Only English-Jewish Newspaper — Incorporating The Detroit Jewish Chronicle

Vol. XL11, No: 3

100Pge Jeri! o Shop p 1

7 1 00 W. 7 Mile Rd.

VE 8-9364 — Detroit 35, September 14, 1962

$6.00 Per Year; Single Copy 20c

School Prayer issue Erupts
into Nationwide Controversy

Executing Judgment in Jewish
Tradition: Experiences of Jews
in Hi ghest Court m the Country

BY DAVID SCHWARTZ

(Copyright, 1962, Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Inc.)

A judge is honored in any country, and to be named to the Supreme
Court is tops. Rightly so. A country can get along without• many things
but not without justice.
There was a time in ancient Israel, when there were no Kings or
Presidents or Prime Ministers or Congress, but a woman, "a mother in
Israel," as she is called in the Bible, Deborah, sat under a palm tree and
the people came to her for judgment and that was enough. Without
judgment, there is chaos and tyranny.
It is not easy to be a good judge. There is the story of the Southern
judge who said he didn't like to hear both sides of a question, as it always
confused him. Even on the Supreme Court, justice must sometimes weep.
One of Arthur Goldberg's Jewish predecessors on the Supreme Court,
Justice Cardozo, once asked: "Why does he dislike me so?" Cardozo was
referring to his colleague on the Supreme Court. Justice McReynolds,
who had a deep anti-Semitic phobia. What can be more of the very
antithesis of justice than prejudice?
If ever there was a man who was regarded
as the ideal judge, it was Cardozo. He was
certainly as American as McReynolds; his an-
cestors had fought in the American Revolution;
his great grandfather was the head of the New-
port synagogue, founded in 1754, to which
George Washington sent his famous letter on
tolerance. Cardozo certainly was as learned in
the law as McReynolds. He wrote better Eng-
lish than McReynolds. Only Justice Holmes
earned the reputation of being a superior Eng-
lish stylist, yet the dirty linen of hate and
prejudice showed itself under the black robe
of justice which draped McReynolds. When
Isaiah admonishes Israel to "execute judgment,"
he first bid them "wash yourself, make your-
self clean."
Preceding Mr. Justice Goldberg, on the
Supreme Court bench, there have been three
Jews — Brandeis, Cardozo and Frankfurter.
Brandeis was an offspring of the old German
Jewish stock. Cardozo goes back to the more
ancient Sephardic stock which came to America
not much later than the Pilgrims. Frankfurter
Justice Cardozo was of Austrian origin. Goldberg is the first
offspring of the Russian Jewish immigration. Brandeis was very strongly
identified with the Zionist movement. Frankfurter also to a lesser extent..
Goldberg, as far as I know, is the only one of the four who has been a
consistent member of a synagogue, although Cardozo, least of the four
connected with Jewish organizations, played at one time a historic role
in perhaps the most historic Jewish congregation in America.
Cardozo's parents were founding members of Shearith Israel, the
Spanish and Portuguese synagogue founded before the American Revo-
lution. When that •congregation moved from its downtown quarter. to
its present place on Central Park West, there was a movement to mod-
ernize its historic mode of worship, to adopt English instead of Hebrew
for prayers, and to do away with the separate gallery for women. Cardozo
for the old
arose to protest the change. - He made a very dramatic plea - and
Cardozo
ways. As he was speaking, there was a thiniderStorm outside,
referred to it. "There are forces outside," he said, "if we are outvoted."
Just as he said that, there was a strong thunderclap and bolt of lightning.
As though Nature was taking a hand and registering its vote too. Anyway,
the congregation, thanks to Cardozo. and the bolt of lightning, kept to
the ancient ways and it is so today.
It is said that President Franklin Pierce - Offered - an appointment
to the Supreme Court to Judah P. Benjamin but he refused it.. It is
also said that the late Judge Mayer Sulzberger might have been named
to the Supreme Court except that the President was afraid to name
any man with a name like Sulzberger to the court. It is a mark of
progress that a man named Goldberg can be appointed with the country
as a whole seemingly approving.
A Hasidic rabbi said that, when the Messiah comes, all the laws will
be reduced to one word. But until that time comes, we will need a
lot of commentary, and that's where the good judge comes in.

.

NEW YORK, (JTA)—A collective reply on the warning voiced by the Jesuit
magazine "America" to Jews in the United States against supporting the United States
Supreme Court decision banning the New York Regents' Prayer in public schools
was issued here by a joint committee of national American Jewish rabbinic and
congregational associations and of national and local Jewish communal organizations.
The statement, reacting to an editorial in the Sept. 1 issue of the magazine
"America," was issued by the Joint Advisory Committee of the Synagogue Cou—nil of
America and the National Community Relations Advisory Council over the names of
its co-chairmen,. Rabbi Julius Mark and Mortimer Brenner. The National Council of
Jewish Women also subscribed to it.
The Synagogue Council of America comprises the national congregational and
rabbinic bodies of Orthodox, Conservative and Reform Judaism. The National Com-
munity Relations Advisory Council is made up of Jewish congregational councils in
major cities throughout the United States. The two councils coordinate their policies
and activities relating to religion and public schools through the Joint Advisory
Committee.
The text of the Joint Jewish statement to the editorial in the Jesuit publication
reads:
"We address ourselves in this statement only to that portion of the editorial
that referred to the consequences that might follow from vigorous public advocacy
by Jewish groups of their viewpoint on the issue of officially prescribed prayers
and other religious observances in public schools.
"The editorial asks the Jews of America 'what bargain they are willing to
strike as one of the minorities in a pluralistic society,' We find the implication
repugnant. We remind 'America' magazine that the American heritage guarantees
to every individual and to every group the right to defend and advocate its views
of what is true and good.
"The idea that any group in this land must barter its right to free speech in
exchange for its security is offensive to everything for which our country stands.
Whatever *differences there may be among American Jews on any issue, there is
complete unanimity among us on this score.
"The American community is made up of many groups, each with its own
convictions as to what is right and best for the whole society. Each of these groups,
regardless of numbers, is equally entitled to give public support and expression to
its convictions. Out of the interplay and competition among the variety of view-
(Continued on Page 7)

,

Ilockwell's Poison Leads _to Murder.

BY MILTON FRIEDMAN

(Copyright, 1962, Jewish Telegraphic ,Agency, Inc.)

WASHINGTON = It was not the American Nazi party that fired
the revolver that killed Lewis Goldfein, a 17-year-old Jewish Virginian.
But it was the party who brought to the youth of the locality the
Nazi philosophy of anti-Jewish violence and contempt for law. The Nazis
gave high school youths "Anne Frank soap" wrappers as a sadistic joke,
held impressive military drills in use of small arms, and glorified the
deeds of Hitler's S.S.
troops.
Admirer of Rockwell
Exploiting "free
speech,"
the American
Kills Jewish Student
Nazi party brought a
FALLS CHURCH, Va., (JTA) — A 17-year-old
source of infection to
youth described by police as an anti-Semite who
northern Virginia. Nazis
admired George Rockwell's American Nazi party and
parade
in stormtrooper
sought to join it, has been indicted for murder by
uniforms, openly flaunt-
a grand jury after shooting to death a Jewish boy,
ing the swastika symbol
also aged 17. The shooting followed years of anti-
and anti-Jewish slogans.
Semitic agitation by the Rockwell movement among
high school youths in northern Virginia.
The Nazis are permitted
The victim of the shooting was Lewis M. Goldfein,
to possess weapons and
an honor student, vice-president of the Falls Church
maintain a paramilitary
High School student council, president of his class,
organization.
and a member of the varsity baseball and wrestling
Hiding cleverly behind
teams. He was shot down at night outside his home
a mantle of civil liber
as he set up a telescope to study the stars. He as-
ties, the Nazis fostered a
pired to become a scientist.
The accused, John C. Vinson, Jr., was described
criminal atmosphere.
as a highly intelligent youth, possessing an I.Q. of
There were police
165. He was ordered by a county judge to be com-
charges of assault, rape,
mitted to a state insane asylum for mental observa-
disorderly conduct, and
tion. -
other offenses against
The Post quoted a probationary official as stating
Rockwell's youthful fol-
that "young Vinson had exhibited some American
lowers. Individual mem-
Nazi party literature on one occasion and he under-
bers went to jail but the
stood, once tried to join the organization but was
movement was permitted
turned down because he was too young." Detective
M. Herbell told the Washington Star "he hated Jews."
to recruit replacements.
The detective also stated that Vinson sought to asso-
Attorney General Rob-
ciate himself with the Rockwell Nazi group. Vinson
ert
F. Kennedy, despite
is a son of a metropolitan police officer who served

on the District of Columbia force for 23 years.

(Continued on -Page 3)

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