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December 29, 1961 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1961-12-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Story of Raphael Jacob Moses,
New Shubin Novel Hits Ill-Advised Philanthropies
Seymour Shubin, a native built up into a great figure, and purpose: a common reservoir of
Fabulous Character of Confederacy, Philadelphian
who has edited a behind the scenes many acts funds that would be used to
detective magazine and has are performed—all to build up finance hospitalization or out-
Uncovered in Archives' Research
done free lance writing, author an ego.
patient treatment for every per-

Research at the American
Jewish Archives on the Cincin-
nati campus of the Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute
of Religion has brought to light
the anniversary of • Raphael
Jacob Moses—Charleston buck,
lawyer, Confederate army offi-
cer, legislator — whose prodigi-
ous career began just 150 years
ago.
Born in Charleston, South
Carolina, Jan. 20, 1812, Moses
came of one of the country's
oldest Jewish families, and his
youth was governed by- the
belief that his parents were
wealthy as well as long-settled.
"My boyhood," he wrote in later
life, "may be condensed into
one word: I was the impersona-
tion of mischief; my pranks
were without limit." When he
was a mere 12%, Moses made
up his mind to leave school. His
parents were unable to dissuade
him, and so the next few years
found Moses in Philadelphia,
New York, and Charleston,
where he devoted himself to
spending money freely, and to
living a life ruled by the im-
pulses of the moment: -
When he was 20, Moses, dis-
covered that his father was
really a poor man. He imme-
diately turned to business the
abundant energy which till then
he had lavised on pleasure.
Opening a store in Charleston,
he ran it successfully till a dis-
astrous fire ruined his business.
That prompted him to move to
St. Josephs, Fla. Business there,
too, was successful for ,a time,
and when it dropped off, he took
to the law, qualifying after six
weeks of study.
In 1849 he moved to Colum-
bus, Ga., where with quick wit
and his knowledge of business
he rapidly built up a lucrative
practice.
Attached to his home was a
large peach orchard. He de-
veloped it, and in 1851, when
there was still no direct rail
connection, he was the first
man to ship peaches to the
New York market. By 1861 he
had 20,000 peach trees and
was making $7,500 a year on
his shipments to New York.
Moses was something of a
Southern fire eater. In 1832,
when his home state proposed
to nullify the tariff law, he en-
listed in the South Carolina
militia and was ready to fight.
In 1850 he was an ardent ad-
vocate of session. When the
Civil War at last broke out,
Moses was approaching 50, but
he joined the Confederate
Forces at once. Serving through-
out the war as Commissary for
General Longstreet's Corps, he
won a high reputation for hon-
esty and resourcefulness in
keeping his troops supplied. In
May, 1865, it fell to him to make
out the last official document
of the Confederacy — an order
directing the payment of $10,-
000 bullion remaining in his
control as an officer of the
shattered government.
The South was devastated,
and Moses' peach orchard was
ruined beyond redemption. But
a fresh phase of his career was
at hand. He resumed his legal
work and, in 1866, was elected
to the Georgia Legislature. His
oratory and his fervent patriot-
ism made him acknowledged
leader of the House.
Withal, Moses was a proud
Jew. "I wanted to go to Con-
gress as a Jew," he wrote,
"and because I was a Jew,
and believed that I might
elevate our people by my pub-
lic course.".
To a Georgia politician who
once taunted him with being a
Jew, Moses wrote a stinging re-
buke in which he said:
"You could not have honored
me more highly, nor distin-
guished me more gratefully
than by proclaiming me a Jew:
I am proud of my lineage and

my race; in your severest cen-
sure you cannot name an act of
my life which dishonors either,
or which would mar the char-
acter of a Christian gentleman.
I feel it an honor to be one of
a race whom persecution cannot
crush; whom prejudices has in
vain endeavoured to subdue;
who, despite the powers of a
man and the antagonism of the
combined powers of the world,
protected by the hand of Deity
have burst the temporal bonds
with which prejudice would
have bound them."
Moses died in 1893, at Brus-
sels, Belgium, where he was
visiting a daughter who lived
there.
This notable 19th-century
American Jew is one of many
whose life stories are to be
found in the files of the Ameri-
can Jewish Archives. Dr. Jacob
Rader Marcus is the director of
the Archives.

Guatemala Publication
Rejects Bribe From
Anti-Semitic Official

GUATEMALA CITY, (JTA)
—The owner of the Catholic
weekly, "Ya," announced that
a large bribe has been offered
the publication if it would pub-
lish an "evidently criminal"
book which "is nothing but an
incitement to kill" Jews.
Elly Rodriguez Gonzalez, own-
er of "Ya," resentfully rejected
the offer, declaring "we cannot
be anti-Semitic because we are
Catholics, nor can we become
advocates for criminals because
we are humans."
According to Miss Gonzalez,
the offer, involving "enough
funds for us to become a daily,"
was made by a local "public
official." The man, she said,
wanted "Ya," to publish a book
which was "obviously a Nazi
legacy embracing more than 100
years of racial prejudices with
the object of re-initiating
hatreds and their consequences
which, thank God, have been
overcome after the most bloody
war in the history of mankind."

of two previous novels, is the
author of a new novel, "Well-
ville, U. S. A.," just published
by Chilton Co., Philadelphia 39.
His new novel is certain to
attract very wide attention in
view of the "expose" it contains
of "organized charity" — the
type of appeal that has long
been frowned upon and which
is today so contrary to the or-
ganized community efforts for
all-inclusive activities in behalf
of the worthiest causes of all
American cities.
"Wellville," of course, is a
fictitious name. In Shubin's
novel it is the name of a hospi-
tal—"non-profit, non-sectarian"
—in behalf of which women
solicit, men contribute at a
"Man of the Year" award din-
ner which nets a handsome sum
at $25-a-plate.
A man who had acquired his
wealth by taking advantage of
an employer whose plant he
gained control of is selected in
the story for the honor. He is

2 New York Theaters
Present Yiddish Plays

The genius who concocted the
scheme, Roy Donoghue, mean-
while falls in love with the
Man of the Year's wife and she
is ready to marry him—until
he decides to take an even
bigger job and she then informs
him that the only thing he does
not possess that her ,
band already has
because mo
he object
she b,re
the illicit affair.
Ro
ad -planned to deliver
a
ech at t
et at
w
he was to say:
suali
a
ning togeth
ery
tio
philanthropic
tion
ose aim is
tre atm
of
catastrop
of campaigns

son who cannot afford it—and
this within their own communi-
ties. Let all national philanth-
ropies of common purpose be
as though without walls to each
other; let there be a flaw in
and out of ideas and money and
e - • • ...ve no

e a an on
soon as he yielded to
tion of a more lucrative 3
from the very limited organiza-
tion for which he had worked.
also exposes the
The
ubli nd honors
avin
ens. That
ove story
nd
an
plot ma
inte
Shu
novel.

Bee Kali Recommends
the Following Cruises

Aboard the Fully Air-Conditioned

NEW YORK, (JTA)—Second
Avenue on Manhattan's Lower
East Side, once the center of
Yiddish legitimate theater, is
making something of a come-
back. Currently, two theaters
are giving Yiddish productions.
After eight seasons of Eng-
lish-language productions, the
Phoenix Theater, renamed the
Casino Theater, is of f e r in g
"Sezunt and Meshuga." The
theater was built originally for
Maurice Schwartz as the Yid-
dish Art Theater.
The nearby Phyllis Anderson
is currently featuring "Bei Mir
Binst Di Schoen," a Yiddish-
American musieal.
Two other theaters that once
were major Yiddish houses—the
National and the Second Ave-
nue—have been razed.

S.S. ATLANTIC

Join Stimulating Celebrities on The

' Bee Kelt

;FEB. 162.4 -13 DAY CARRIB-BEAN CRUISE

iTHAT COMBINES ARTS AND TRAVEL...

CORNELIA OTIS SKINNER, Famed Actress and Writer
LLOYD GOODRICH, Authority on American Art
JOHN CIARDI, Noted Poet and Critic

Enjoy readings, seminars and discussions by these
gifted lecturers, a Classic Film Festival, Meyer Davis..
dinner and dance music and gourmet meals.

API RI Li 41".
35 DAY iMEDITERRANIAN PASSOVER CRUISE

Try to be everybody's friend
and you'll be your own worst
enemy.

VISIT SPAIN, ITALY, SICILY, GREECE, ISRAEL
SHIP IS HOTEL FOR ENTIRE 8-DAY ISRAEL STAY

Reservations Are Still Available BUT PLEASE
Make Your Arrangements NOW!

PHONE• FOR APPOINTMENT

1AT YOUR HOME OR OFFICE

BEE KALI TRAVEL SERVICE

BIRMINGHAM PHONE:
MI 62170

DETROIT PHONE:
JO 6-140

Women's Auxiliary

OF THE

Jewish National Fund

ANNUAL DONOR TEA

Tuesday, Januar 30, 1962 12:30 p.m.

Berson Rd.

TEMPLE

Guest Speaker

Guest Artist

MISS IRINA MATARI

FOR

RESERVATIONS:

CALL

MRS. GEORGE LERNER, UN 2-7438

Fund-Raising Chairman

MRS. SOL LIFSITZ, DI 1-0622

Donor Secretary

MRS. EDWARD WISHNETSKY, DI 1-2411

President

RABBI CHARLES E. SHULMAN

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