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October 20, 1961 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1961-10-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

New $3,000,000 Stock
Issue Offered by PEC

Palestine Economic Corpora-
tion is offering a new issue of
120,000 shares of common stock
to be sold at par value of $25
per share under a registration
statement which became. effec-
tive Sept. 27, with the Secur-
ities and Exchange Commission.
This follows the recent comple-
tion of the sale by the company
of 124,000 shares at par value
aggregation $3,100,000..
According to the prospectus,
the 35-year old company had
579,255 shares of common stock
outstanding, and assets totalling
$19,794,888 as -of June 30, 1961.
The new stock issue is b'eing
offered for cash and/or. State of
Israel Bonds.

East European Jews First Settled
ORT Schools .in Dan Pines, Editor,
Dies in Israel at 61
in N.Y.'s Chinatown, Historian Says Israel Indicate
TEL AVIV, (JTA) — Dan
Chinatown was the original over the Bowery — the di-
Pines, editor of the popular
Peak
Enrollment
home of Jews from Eastern Eur- viding line between China-
Hebrew daily n'e w s p a p e r

ope in New York City, and not,
as commonly believed, the Low-
er East Side, according to Dr.
Hyman B. Grinstein, noted
American Jewish historian.
Grinstein, who is professor of
Jewish History at Yeshiva Uni-
versity, also contradicted the
prevalent impression that the
initial date of Eastern European
Jewish migration to this coun-
try was 1882, pre-dating this
accepted year by more than four
decades.
Regarding the settlement in
Chinatown, he explained that
it was not until after 1870 that
these Jews began "spilling over"
into the Lower East Side from
Chinatown, forced to do so by
overcrowded living conditions.

town and the Lower East
Side — into Forsyth, Eld-
ridge, Orchard, Hester, and
the other well-known East
Side streets.

The vocational schools of "Omer" and author of many
ORT in Israel will record the books, died Saturday at Rehovot
highest student enrollment in where he was resting after suf-
their history during the school fering from a heart ailment. He
year now commencing, accord- was 61 years old.
• "In the 1880's when the mass- ing to a report just released
Born in Astrakhan, Russia, he
es fleeing the pogroms and here.
received a
other Eastern European perse-
basic Jewish
The
report
likewise
notes
cutionists began to arrive in in- that Israel .
education i n
schools will
creasing numbers, the East Side admit their ORT
the yeshiva in
largest freshman
— formerly the home primarily class of new pupils.
Slonim. H i s
of Germans and Irish — was
general educa-
The
ORT
report
cites
a
jump
transformed. The new group
tion was re-
moved throughout the area, al- of 1,000 pupils in the three
ceived in the
and
four
year
vocational
high
most to the banks of the East
universities of
schools
alone,
an
increase
of
River. Again, due to overcrowd-
Kharkov, Eka-
ing, the smaller buildings were 25 per cent since last year. An
terinoslav and
enrollment
of
almost
5,000
is
an-
razed, and tenements erected,"
oscow.He
Hebrew Corner
ticipated
in
such
schools.
he explained.
was the head
Apprenticeship, a relatively
One of the factors identifying
of the Hecha-
Chinatown with Jewish immi- recent development for Israel,
lutz movement
As for the early arrival of gration is the predominance in is expected to double this corn-
in the Soviet
Jews from Eastern Europe — the tenements' once-ornate fa- ing year to reach a figure of
Union which
3,000
young
people
who
will
cades of 'Stars of David and
The Jewish community in . the city Lithuania at first, and later
was liquidated
of Padua in Italy, is considered, till
Poland, Russia, Romani a, other Biblical symbols, accord- be assigned to on-the-job learn-
by the Soviet
this day, a distinguished community
ing to Grinstein. "If you look ing, supplemented by classroom
(to an extent) that the name stirs up Hungary and Galicia — Grin-
Pines
authorities in
(awakens a feeling of) honor in the stein said, the first influx be-
closely at some of the build- and workshop study at special 1930.
Jews of Italy. This community gave
centers
established
in
Jaffa,
ings
on
Mott
and
other
streets,"
gan during the 1840's, with a
the world Rabbi Moses Haim Luzzato
He then reached Palestine,
(Ramhal), who was one of the great-
true mass migration not oe- he stated, "you can still see Jerusalem and Ramat Gan. Ap- where he joined the editorial
_
est scholars in his generation.
prenticeship
is
viewed
as
one
curing until the 1870's and these ornatnentations."
But today Padua is almost without
staff of the Davar, leading daily
Jews; only, a few hundred Jews con-
Grinstein- credits the Lithu- of the most hopeful experi- newspaper of which he later be-
early 1880's.
tinue to live in the shadow of it's
great part. The boy Aldo (belongs to)
"From 1840-1845, Eastern anian Jews with being the first ments for bringing large bod- came co-editor.
of youth within an indus-
is one of the few young boys of the
European
Jews arrived here in of the Eastern Europeans to ar- ies
As one of the leaders of the
community. There is no Jewish school
trial training framework.
in the place, and his father took hint comparatively small numbers, rive here. "This was a some-
Histadrut, Israel's Federation
to the Rabbi of the place so that he although by 1880, there were what nomadic group," he noted,
of Labor, he was sent in 1945
should teach him the Hebrew lan-
guage and a few laws. As Aldo grew more than 25,000 — 10 per cent "constantly looking for locali- Urge Industries
to the United States to repre-
older his (closeness) connections with of the nation's Jewish popula- ties in which they could im-
sent the Histadrut. In this cap-
his christian friends strengthened,
Take Problems to
and he began to (learn) become in- tion," Grinstein stated. "Of prove their economic lot."
acity he spent four years dur-
fluenced from their deeds.
ing which he also lectured on
When he heard about the estab- these," he continued, "some
Technion
Institute
lishment of a State for Jews, there 15,000 were liv,ing in New Algerian Situation
literature, education and ec-
came a turning point in his life. The
"Many problems in chemical onomic problems in the Middle
State of Israel (returned to him) York."
industries could be solved by East at New York University
aroused again his interest in the Jew-
Explaining the movement of Called 'Intolerable'_
. ish Nation. At the celebration of the these Jews from Chinatown to
a comparatively small amount and Roosevelt College in Chi-
Day of Liberation of the State—that
of research work and pilot plant cago.
was arranged in a modest form by the Lower East Side, the his- by Jewish Leader
the community of Padua—the place torian • said, "After the • Civil
LONDON, (JTA) — The Jews testing at Technion, but up to
He was president of the Is-
of Aldo was not missing. The idea of
going up to Israel stood at the center War, the larger numbers of of Algeria are being placed in an the present time these facilities rael Journalists Association till
of his ambitions, but to fulfill it he
still needed to know the Hebrew East European Jews coming to intolerable situation as a result are not being used," Emile C. recently and also served as
language. So he returned to the Rabbi this country caused overcrowd- of opposing stands toward them Freeland, chemical engineering chairman of the Israeli Founda-
of the community, whom he knew ing along what we know as by the FLN, the Algerian rebel expert with the U.S. Operations
tion for Infantile Paralysis. He
since his early youth, so he could
learn Hebrew from him. From the Mott, Baxter, Elizabeth and organization, R. N. Carvalho, Mission to Israel, r e p o r t e d developed a new system for He-
chamber of the Synagogue in which Bayard streets. This was met in president of the Anglo-Jewish through the USOM director to
brew verbs and grammar and a
the Ramhal studied came out and was
Association, declared at a meet- the government of Israel at dictionary of foreign words in
heard the voice of Young Aldo. Aldo two ways.
asked the Rabbi to give him a Hebrew
"First, the small buildings ing of the Association's Council. the end of his two-year service Hebrew. He also compiled the
name; the Rabbi thought a little, and
which then existed along
He said the FLN on the one at the Technion in Haifa.
here a name was found—"Eldad."
Popular. Encyclopedia w h i c Ii
"And who knows" said the Rabbi to those streets were torn down, hand was telling the Jews that
"It is highly recommended was issued in three volumes in
Aldo "possibly, by that name, one of
and tall tenements -- many of they were Algerians, while at the that industries having particu- 1956.
your ancestors was called in the pre-
vious generations.
which still stand — were same time, Algerian Jews were lar problems should take them
Many days did not pass and Eldad
erected. Then, as even these being attacked by the FLN in to Technion. It very often hap- Pianist 'Sidney Sukoenig Dies
went up to settle in the Land of
Israel.
became too congested, the the name of Algerian patriotism pens that industries think that
Sidney Sukoenig, well known
Translation of 'Hebrew column
Eastern Europeans spilled and Arab solidarity. He ex- their problems can only be concert pianist who was profes-
Published by Brith Ivrith, Olamit,
Jerusalem.
pressed the hope that.FLN lead- solved by paying for royalties sor of music at Syracuse Univer-
ers would "realize the effect on and know-how abroad, whereas sity, died at University Hospital,
world opinion of this sort of a much cheaper, quicker and Syracuse, N. Y.,, Sunday, at the
thing and restrain their support- more adequate solution of these age of 54. He was the son of
ers from committing similar out- problems can be obtained by Cantor Abraham Sukoenig of
having such institutes as Tech- Park Ave. Synagogue, New
rages in the future."-
1-0;111-L2x,
nion work upon them," he said. York.
Freeland painted out that
Y-I Youth Season Starts USOM
had furnished $27,500
Young Israel of Oak-Woods for pilot plant equipment at Children's Magazine,
.irrn non iritTwt);:i -
t
invites youngsters 4-12 to parti- the Technion. "This can be a Olam Chadash, Now -
cipate in its youth activities most valuable asset to the (Is-
rirrpri Lptri nitvp417;:i
117
programs, the first of which will rael) chemistry industry, if only in N.Y. Jewish Schools
NEW YORK, (JTA) — The
be held 2 p.m. Sunday at the use is made of it . . . The indus-
eiPR4 lzF?t$ ri`PAtO
first issue of "Olam Chadash,
Young Israel Center.
tries
are
not
doing
themselves
,
rtz y .
te7 -
1,4
Featured with entertainment, justice if they do not take ad- illustrated Hebrew monthly for
children and youth, made its
refreshments
and prizes.
vantage of these facilities."
inipp (npri) lizp4
appearance here under the edi-
torship of Elchanan Indelman,
Mltr.'? ri:'?1/371.
well-known Hebrew educator.
It will be distributed in Jew-
BY
HENRY
LEONARD
""P It;
;1:;:itg
,02"ri??1)
ish schools and will reflect the
activities of HebreW schools in
nv -
tVari'?
the United States. It will also
bring news about Jewish life in
07,1
V4
./141prr i nyt4: )ri i
America, Israel and other coun-
•14.7. 3 Mitt
tries. -
zi
171 ;;;IIYMP
The magazine is published by
ni-itrJr)
Hebrew Publications for Chil-
dren, Inc., a non-profit organi-
zation of which Jacob Kinzler is
president. Jacob Goodman and
nt,g nppn
Isaac Genack are the vice-presi-
dents of fhe organization: Asher
1 2tg*ip 57ritg41 x4: ,z7-ropnrT
Wolk is managing editor of the
publication.
tip.4
.14p4ri

Aldo Changed
Into Eldad

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6.0



oPN

Shrinks Hemorrhoids
Without Surgery
stops I —Relieves Pain
t h

•••

• • 11

"WERE THERE No POOR SAGES WHO
COULD HAVE BUN SUSTAINED WITH
THE MONEY THUS FoOLISHLY
SPENT ON THIS BOILDINCk. ?"

e0P,t.

190. Quin Proclu(tions

PASS! CHAMA, IN THE PALESTINIAN
VALMUD, 400 C.E.

has founds
a new
ng substanc
thews.
to '
g ab y. to shri
emore
r • a and
el'eve
in —
out
ase,
Ho
entgleyrY.
u al
au ir
s
tion (s
tlace.
amazing
ere so • or.
ough tha
made asto
in
statements e
have c
to,
SI he Iles
be a prob
secret
nelek
healing
tance (Bio-D
)— di
covery of a world-fa
resea
institute. This subst
now avail '

ointment for

;eaters.

ti Vik

At all drue.

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