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October 06, 1961 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1961-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

James N. Rosenberg's Versatility in Evidence
at Exhibition of His Works at Art Institule

A distinguished "first night-
ers' " gathering joined in pay-
ing honor to a noted artist and
prominent lea d e r s in many
activities in American and Jew-
ish life during the past 50 years,
on the opening night of the
exhibition of the paintings of
James N. Rosenberg, at the Art
Institute.
On the eve of his 87th birth-
day, which he will observe on
Nov. 20, Rosenberg continues
to show great power as an artist,
and among his 52 paintings on
exhibition here are some that
were loaned by prominent in-
dividuals and art museums from
many parts of the land.
While the bulk of his work
now being exhibited here was
done since 1959, among the
loaned paintings are some that
were done as far back as 1919.
Thus, although he retired
from a lucrative law practice
in 1947, Rosenberg has been
painting since his early youth.
His works have rec eive d

recognition f rom museums
throughout the world,
m any potential p
sers
here are attesting
e pop-
st and his
ularity of the
works. The Ro berg exhibit
will contin
here through
Oct. 29.
Rosenber said he had o
regret over e selection of
exhibition he
paintings f
that he no nger has avail le
rks done by him
any of the
in Israel. Mo of them are in
in
Brandeis Univ
gogues and colleges
the land.
The reception in the artist's
honor on Tuesday commenced
with greetings by E. P. Richard-
son. director of the Art Museum
and of the Archives of Ameri-
can Art to which will be de-
voted all proceeds from the
sale of the Resenberg paint-
ings. .
Richardson spoke of "the re-
markable man" who not only
has given all of the paintings

Nederlanders Receive Wide Acclaim
on Opening of New Fisher Theater;
Schwartz's Music Delights Audience

To the Nederlanders goes the
credit for an achievement—the
establishment_of "the"most mag-
nificent legitimate theater in
the world"—which has attracted
widest attention.
Their new Fisher Theater offi-
cially opened Monday evening
with the pre-Broadway presen-
tation of "The Gay Life," pro-
duced by Kermit Bloomgarden,
the famous producer of "The
Music Man."
The new play's book, by Fay
and Miachel Kanin, with music
by Arthur Schwartz and Howard
Dietz, have elevated the pro-
duction to great heights.
These developments of the
current week, which have made
musical history, are due to the
vision of the Nederlanders-
David T., president of the Ned-
erlander Theatrical Corp., and
his sons, Joseph and James.
The father, "D.T." as asso-
ciates and friends call him,
started in show business in the
old Shubert Opera House, ac-
quired the present Shubert
Theater on Lafayette 20 years
ago and also began operating
the Riviera recently.
His sons took an interest in
their father's theatrical business
shortly after their Bar Mitzvah.
James is in New York most of
the time, doing the booking, and
the local. activities are managed
by Joseph.
The Nederlanders now are
beaming with pride at their
new success. "D. T." said this
week:
"With great pride and deep
humility, we accept the chal-
lenge represented- by this mag-
nificent new theater and pledge
that we shall scrupulously en-

deavor to fulfill the confidence
expressed in us by the Fisher
brothers and members of; their
families. Detroit and the entire
theatrical world are hopeless
indebted to the Fishers for
generosity in endowi
community with t
finest legitimate t
The delightf
music by
Arthur Schw
is the high-
light of the m cal. Together
with lyricist oward Dietz,
Schwartz wo ed on the score
for a year nd a half. Tre-
mendous es already are
predicted f the recordings of
the numer s entertaining se-
lections of he Gay Life."
There are number of minor
handicaps t t already are being
overcome in the play. Even be-
fore the cur in went up for the
Opening perf ance on Monday,
the Kanins, wartz and •
went to work t ove-
ments and changes.
Schwartz said that complete
changes are being made for the
openings of both the first and
second acts.
The first act lasted an hour
and 38 minutes on opening night.
It's being cut by about 15 min-
utes. A few good scenes will suf-
fer, but such cutting is considered
a necessity.
There is little of brass in the
music of "The Gay Life," and
even those who sat in the front
row, facing the orchestra, were
nOt annoyed by loud music. There
is delight in the scores from be-
ginning to end. "Magic Moment,"
"I Never Had a Chance," "Mag-
da" and at least five or six more
songs are among the, musical
numbers that add glory - to
Schwartz's creative career.

The University of Michigan
Herbarium has not only a mas-
sive collection of specimens of
ering plants which are in-

Archieves but also has giv
to the Detroit Art Institute an
oil, a pastel and a group of
tings for the inc ion in
perm
ion.
red by
r, artist,
t fishing
f artist

os-
of art
the Archives
man Art also is being
applied to Rosenberg's rich
collection of memoirs.
Among the Rosenberg collec- .
tions displayed at the current
exhibition is an application he
made as a lawyer 50 years ago
for the first retractable auto
top. On display, as;.ari indication
of the r>iian's versatility, are
plaYst he had written as far
back as 1916, bis reports on
colonization work in Sosua and
the Dominican Republic, num-
erous catalogs of exhibits of his
works throughout the world, his
work on "Pastel Expression"
written in 1919 and other works.
In his reply to Richardson's
greetings, Rosenberg told of
his joy in being here and as
an expression of respect for
a noted leader with whom- he
had worked in the JDC, he
presented to the Jewish C
munit
done
ack, Octob
rom 1959 to 196 n memory
of Fred M. Bu 1. The paint-
ing was ace pted in behalf
of the Center by Irwin Shaw,
pits executive director.
The exhibition's catalog con-
tains a glowing tribute to Rosen-
b • rg by • ichardson. It rec
• senb
unal
DC,
red
t
com
ee
ion o the Genocide
tion b the United N
lion
pleaded for its r
nate. He
the United Stat
sit here that
said during. •
to secure ratifi-
he still s •
he important conven-
catio

Mrs. Rosenberg accompanied
her husband to Detroit for the
opening of the exhibition. They
came here a day earlier to be
present for the opening night
of "The Gay Life" at the Fisher
Theater and to be here to ap-
plaud the work of the musical's
composer, Arthur Schwartz, who
has been a friend of the Rosen-
bergs for more than 30 years.

Moslem Gets Life Term
Aiding Morocco Jews

CASABLANCA, (JTA)—Mo-
hammed Diab Abbissi, a Mos-
lem accused of "aiding Jews
trying to get to Israel," was
sentenced here to life impris-
onment.
The court found him guilty
on a charge of "harming the
internal and external security
of the State."

creased at a rate of 16,000 per
year, but also a renowned collec-
tion of some 140,000 fungi and
46,000 lichens.

* THE EXCITING NEW

FISHER THEATRE

Opened October 1st

AS GUESTS OF

HAMILTON MOTOR SALES

* THE RAKISH NEW

PLYMOUTHS & VALIANTS

WIN one of the three pairs of tickets to "The Gay Life" at
The Fisher Theatre and . . . See and drive the imaginative
new PLYMOUTH and VALIANT !

HAMILTON MOTOR SALES

HAMILTON at DAVISON

TO 6-2800

CITY of HOPE

City of Hope National Medical Center
AE
VIEW
dscaped acres in the desert near Los
located on 95
Angeles, Calif
ia. Free and nonsectarian, the City of
Hope Medica
enter and its affiliated Research Institute
conducts a elentless search for new insights into • the
treatmen nd conquest of the physically and financially
catastr
ic diseases. Dedicated to the service of humanity,
the
ty of Hope offers care without charge to patients
m all parts of the country, of all races and creeds.

MitTON
BERLE

Beloved
Entertainer

Exclusive
Appearance
for the

CITY OF HOPE

48th ANNUAL DINNER DANCE
SHERATON-CADILLAC HOTEL

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 5

Please . . .

if you are an invitee ... please notify us at once.
We sincerely wish we could invite everyone -who wished to attend.

The CITY OF HOPE needs your support to continue its ireat
work in the field of cancer and heart disease. Send your contri-
butions TODAY.

CITY OF HOPE, 14379 LIVERNOIS, DETROIT

MILTON BERLE TO III HEIGHT
DINNER
CITY OF HOPE 48th

City of Hope Non-Sectarian Services
Extended to Catastrophic Disease Victims

Contributions are sent di-
rectly to the City of Hope for
the support of the great medical
and research center. The City
of Hope has mushroomed from
two tents in the desert in 1913
to a great internationally recog-
nized facility concentrating on
the research in cane e r, leu-
kemia and other catastrophic
diseases. -
These great services are ten-

race,
dered with no exceptio
arge is
color or creed and
made, reports Jose Lee, presi-
dent.
The Detroit usiness Men's
Group has spe
eaded the De-
in recognizing
troit commun
this tremend •
humanitarian
effort. In ret
Detroit has
been ' accorded •
• de
for its great efforts.
For contribution information,
call the City of Hope, TE 4-3808.

d Cardiac Cripple
To Healthy Youngster

Recent at
of the
open-
t surgery
on
• -old
aor is ste is,
danger is
i na
owin
the reat ar • lead-
rom the heart. In •
72 hours he

Wouldn't you like to join this
crusade?

World F41110
iner to Make
Detroit Business Men's
Exclusive Appeara e
Champagne Dinner at
raton Cadillac

Milton • Berle, whose outstanding,
rious antics
enerations of child
and adults
11 make a special appearance f
he benefit of
the Sheraton-
City of Hope Sunday, Nov.
C 'llac Hotel.
• nce again a• top fli
ertainment personality
has been enga
perform exclusively for
Detroit's
pporters of the City of Hope.
n on television and a long time star
show business, Mr. Berle's inimitable charm and
personality will enrich another memorable evening
given for the benefit of the City of Hope, engaged
in one of mankind's great crusades against catastro-
phic diseases.
Music for the Champagne Hour and dancing will
be presented by Detroit's well-known Dick Stein.

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