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September 29, 1961 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1961-09-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NORTHWEST CHILD RES-
CUE WOMEN announces newly
installed officers are Mesdames
David Samuelson, president;
Joseph Cohen and Nathan Yost,
vice presidents; Edward Kaiser,
treasurer; Miss Florence Wein-
garden and Mesdames Max
Wolf, Sam Kampner, Charles
Heiman, and Arthur Simon, sec-
retaries. A regular meeting of
the club will be held Oct. 12
at the home of Miss Weingar-
den, 19434 Ardmore.
* * *
SA'AD CLUB is planning its
annual -fund-raising affair, the
,proceeds of which will go to
the Parkinson's Disease Re-
search Fund at Wayne State
University, College of Medicine.
A fashion show and a dance
exhibition will be presented.
The affair will be held 8:30
;p.m. Oct. 25 at Adas Shalom
Synagogue. Ticket chairman
;Mrs. Anne.Hirshfield, LI 2-7083,
may be called for information.
* * *

TOWN AND COUNTRY
CHAPTER, Women's American
ORT, will hold a board meeting
8 p.m. Tuesday at the' home of
'Mrs. Steven Meyers, 24704
Pierce, to make plans for the
bazaar-fashion show slated for.
Oct. 17.
* * *
KINNERET CHAPTER, Pio-
neer Women, will meet 12:30
p.m. Wednesday at the Hayim
Greenberg Center. Mrs. Frances
Driker will present a culture
program. Hostesses will be Mes-
dames Leena Braver and Bertha
Siegel.
* * *
ROSENWALD LADIES AUX-
ILIARY, American Legion, will
hold an executive board meeting
8:30 p.m. 'Wednesday at the home
of President Mrs. Bertha Gold-
stein, 23410 Geneva, Oak Park.
* * *
ADAS S H A L OM SISTER-
HOOD announces a new book re-
view series, under the co-chair-
manship of Mrs.. Philip Helfman
and Mrs. Joseph Katchke, will
begin 10 a.m. Oct. 17 at the
synagogue. Reviewers for the
series (Oct. 17, Nov. 21, Jan. 16
and Feb. 20) include Amos Ar-
icha, Mrs. Jacob E. Segal, Mar-
tin E. Citrin and Rabbi Jacob E.
Segal. Consultants include Mes-
dames Sol Hammerstein, pres-
ident; Jacob E. Segal, Nicholas
Fenakel, Manny Lax and Louis
oreak-
. E. Levitan. A conti I .
fast will be se
nd Mrs. A
Mrs. Earl
tickets, call Mrs.
Morrison
Philip
wald, UN 3-6127, or
Sr Partner, UN 3-3789.
Mrs.

and J
Rabb'
est sp
er.

A R D
ORT
0 0 D
CH, Jewish
en Eu-
BR
ganization,
rope
Welfare

ANTIQUE
JEWELRY

A Beautiful Selection of
Many Pieces Depicting
the Fine Skill of the Old
Craftsmen.

Visit With the Lattins at

1.4041

QUALITY
JEWELERS

129-131 W. NINE MILE ROAD
FERNDALE 20, MICHIGAN

LI 2-2110

Open Thurs., Fri., Sat. to 9

will meet noon Wednesday at
Jericho Temple, 18495 Wyom-
ing. President .Mrs. Morris Haut
announces a bake sale will be
held Oct. 19 at Edison's, 'North-
land. A dessert luncheon will be
served.

*

ADAS S H A LO M SISTER-
HOOD will begin the new season
noon Oct. 9 in the synagogue
social hall, announces Presi-
dent Mrs. Sol Hammerstein.
Theme for the new season, "A
Year of Adventure for the
Heart, Mind and Spirit," will be
developed by Laurantine- Bar-
rett Sollins, author, educator
and authority, on health educa-
tion, He 'will speak on "How to
Get the Most , Out of Life." In
charge of arrangements are Mes-
dames Manny' Lax, program
chairman; N o r in a n Canner,
chairman of the day, and Mar-
tin Share and Harry Hartman,
hostess chairmen. A luncheon
will precede the meeting. Baby
sitters- will be provided.
8 :
*
ALPHA OMEGA DENTAL
AUXILIARY will hold a mem-
bership tea 12:30 p.m. Oct. 10 at
the home of Mrs. Jack Freed-
land, 4785 W. Outer Dr.- The
dramatic group under the chair-
manship of Mrs. Daniel Good-
man will present an original
music skit written by Mesdames
Alvin Geffin, Leslie Moss, Ger=
ald Michael, David Stulberg
and Jason Goode. Chairman of
the tea is Mrs. Herbert Gold-
storm. Co-chairmen are 1Vies-

dames David Silver, Joseph
Grant, Milton Jacobs and Harry
Wenner.
* * *
NORTHWEST DETROIT
CHAPTER, Children's Asthma
Research Institute and Hospital
and Jewish National Home for
Asthmatic Children, will begin
its annual membership drive
Oct. 4 at the home of Mrs.
Harry Raf, 15251 Park, Oak
Park. Thomas Zoller of Tiffin,
Ohio, whose son has just re-
turned • as a normal young man
after two years at the home,
will tell of his son's recovery.
The institute accepts children
from six to 15 years of age, free
without regard to their race or
religion. For information, call
membership chairman Mrs. Max
Freedman, DI 1-7651, or Presi-
dent Mrs. Irving Medow, DI
1-1996.
* *
CONG. AHA VAS ACHIM
SISTERHOOD will hold its
third annual Women's Institute
beginning Oct. 17, announces
Mrs. Arthur Weintrob, adult ed-
ucation chairman. The Institute
will continue weekly in the
mornings and afternoons until
April 3. - Rabbi Milton Arm will
teach classes in "Hebrew for
Beginners," "The Next Step
in Hebrew" and "Reading of
the Bible." Cantor Simon Ber-
manis will conduct "Songs of
the Synagogue." For infori
tion, call Mrs. We
1-6882.

Academic Freedom
in Malamud's No

Bernard Malamud has_ gain
high status in literary ran
especially with his last
b o o k s, "The Assistant"
"The Magic Barrel." His n
and s h or t stories have
acclaim for their high lit
style and the author's im
tive writing.
He is due for another ro
of applause for his latest no
"A New Life," an Oct. 4 title.
His publishers are F a r r a r,
Straus & Cudahy (19 Union Sq.,
W., N.Y..3). _
Unlike the previous two
works, "A New Life" does not
have a_ Jewish theme, although
the name of the hero, Seymour
(Sy)—(in his youth his family
called him Sam) Levin, sounds
Jewish.
Levin is a bearded young man
30 who gave up drinking and
t out on an academic career
an instructor in composition
Cascadia College in the
orthwestern part of our land.
e hailed from New York and,
as is related in the course of
the novel's development, his
father was a jail bird and his
mother committed suicide. But
he took hold of himself, gave
up drinking and smoking and
sincerely sought a career in
teaching.
Upon his arrival at Cascadia,
Levin was met by a couple, Dr.
Gerald Gilley, a superior in
the English department at the
college, and his wife Pauline.
At Cascadia, two things de-
veloped: Levin's share in the
battle for academic freedom
and higher standards of teach-
ing and his love affair with
Pauline. As a result of both,
he was discharged at the end
of his first year and, with Paul-
ine and two adopted Gilley
children, he set out to seek a
new life.
The briefing given Levin
by the heads of the college
and the details revolving
around the college struggle
for better standards makes
yialamud's "A New Life" an
outstanding study in impor-
tant social issues. Educators
will find much reality in the
discussions between the
liberals who were striving for
the right to introduce a lib-,

eral arts pr ogr ai
cadia,
ei • o
the
that was
Levin's i as a = introduced
liege. It was
as he leav
not desti d for him to
the fruit of his labor
is
illicit lo
affair acco
d for
his failure at the
ege.
The sex
nt is consider-
ayed in this book. It
could have been toned down.
Levin nearly becomes involved
in two other difficulties with a
waitress and a student, but the
affair with the wife of a faculty
member turned to love.
True, towards the end he
thought of fleeing and getting
away from the involvement
with a head of his department.
But the story ends on a note
of acceptance when Levin is
told that Pauline is pregnant.
Malamud proves in "A New
Life," his narrative skill and
his possession of a noteworthy
style. With his new novel, he
retains the role of one of the
best novelists of our time.

Center Concert
Series Season
Begins Oct. 10

The . Center Symphony Or-
chestra with Julius Chajes,
conductor, will start its Tues-
day Evening Concert Series on
Oct. 10. The following soloists
have been listed:
Oct. 10, Stuart Canin, volinist,
Paganini-Violin Concerto in D
Major.
Nov. 14, Julius Chajes, pian-
ist, Chopin-POlonaise Brillante,
Op. 22; Emily Adams, violinist,
Mozart-Violin Concerto in A
Major, K. 219.
Dec. 12, Paul Olefsky, cellist,
Saint Saens-Cello Concerto;
Nathan Gordon, violinist, Han-
del-Viola Concerto.
Jan. 23, Jakob Gimpel, pian-
ist, Beethoven-Piano Concerto
No. 4 in G Major.
April 17, Mischa Kottler, pian-
ist, Tschaikowsky-Piano Con-
certo No. 1.
May 15, Mischa Mischakoff,
violinist, Wieniawski-Violin Con-
certo in D Minor.

NOTICE
TO
FUR
YERS

By order of the owners the present stock
of Ceresnie Bros. and Offen must be re-
duced immediately. Effective at once, until
supply is exhausted, a group of 195 furs
is placed on sale to the general public at
important reductions. Dealers excluded.

luded i his sale are full-length coats
jack s, stol
boleros, in Mink, Alaska
Seal, Beave Otter, Sables, Persian Lamb,
Broadtail, hinchilla and other precious
furs.

A SAMPLING

OF, THE

REDUCTIONS

YOU MAY

EXPECT

Sale Priced $1,995

MINK COATS

Natural Black Ranch, Stewart Autumn Haze, Etc.

MINK JACKETS

Sale Priced $795

Breath of Spring, Cerulean

MINK BOLEROS

Sale Priced $750_

Natural, All Shades

Sale Priced $850

BEAVER COATS

Dyed Canadian Oyster, Rose Beige, Carmel

Sale Priced $995

ALASKA SEAL COATS

Dyed Motor°, Kitovi, Block

Furs Labeled to Show Country of Origin

furs by

CERESNIE BROS.

and

OFFEN

19386 LIVERNOIS AVENUE
At Outer Drive
DETROIT 21, MICHIGAN

536 NORTH WOODWARD

3 Blks. North of Mgple
BIRMINGHAM, MICH IGAN

UNiversity 2-8822

Midwest 7-2227

Member of Master Furriers Guild of America

15 — TH E DETROIT JEWISH NEWS -- Frida y, September 29, 1961

Women's Citchs

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