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September 15, 1961 - Image 23

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1961-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Finkel-Hubert
Engagement Told

MISS DIANNE FINKEL

The engagement of Dianne
Finkel and Norman Hubert was
announced at a recent dinner
party.
Parents of the couple are Mr.
and Mrs. David H. Finkel of
Fairfield Ave. and Dr. and Mrs.
William J. Hubert of Northlawn
Ave.
Miss Finkel is a graduate of
the Liggett School and is now
a senior in the School of Educa-
tion at the University of Michi-
gan. Her fiance is also a senior
at the University of Michigan,
where he is affiliated with Phi
Sigma Delta fraternity.
A . June 24 wedding is planned.

Catholics' Flight
from Nazism Told
in Burmetz's Book

Accounts of flights from Naz-
ism are multiplying. The stories
that continue to be related by
survivors from the worst scourge
in history are told by non-Jews
as well as Jews.
The newest narrative is by and
about a Catholic family. In -"Our
Share of Morning," published by
Doubleday, Paul Burmetz, a Cath-
olic, tells how he had refused to
join the Nazis in Vienna, how
he and his wife and infant daugh-
ter fled from the dangers that
threatened them, how they defied
the menacing situations that con-
fronted them, finally to find
haven in Switzerland and then to
settle in their present permanent
home in this country.
In this deeply-moving descrip-
tion of the trio's flight, Burmetz
tells how he came to France and
there received whatever tempo-
rary encouragement could be
given by the Committee for In-
tellectual Refugees. Then began
the search for freedom.
From 1939 to 1942, it was a
constant flight. They were sepa-
rated for a time, they continued
to seek ways of escaping from the
oncoming hordes of Nazis, finally
got to Switzerland, only to be de-
ported when they were caught by
border police, then tried again
and succeeded in securing haven.
As the persecutions began,
Burmetz tells how the Nazis
searched for Jews, how he and
his wife were under suspicion.
Their wanderings became all
the more difficult because their
infant daughter Mignon was in-
valided and had to be carried
wherever they went. But with
their 'liberation also came a cure
for het' and they finally acquired
their "share of morning." Bur-
metz's story adds to the volumi-
nous chronicle of courage display-
ed by the escapees from Nazism
and at the same time increases
the evidence against the criminal
Hitlerite hordes who were respon-
sible for the extermination of
millions of human beings.

The report of two English
physicians cited cases of nine
mentally disturbed patients
who habitually got drunk on
water. Their intake of up to
35 pints a day so diluted their
blood as to cause intoxicative
symptoms.

Herman Kilik's Posthumous 'Diary Judith Rose Wed
of Vilna Ghetto' Adds Testimony to Joel Adelman
Exposing Nazi Beasts' Brutalities

At last, a vast literature is
being collected to describe the
holocaust of our time and to
expose the Nazi crimes. In this
literature will be incorporated
also the story of heroism, of
resistance by many Jews, of the
battle for freedom. It will prove
that not all Jews yielded to the
Nazi scourge and that many
fought for their rights.
A valuable addition to this
literature is "The Diary of the
Vilna Ghetto," by Herman
Kruk, published by Yivo Insti-
tute for Jewish Research (1948
5th, N. Y. 28), with notes and
explanations by Mordecai W.
Bernstein.
The book is in Yiddish. There
is a brief explanatory chapter in
English.
Herman Kruk, the author of
this diary, was the director of
the Groser Library in Warsaw.
Escaping the second week of
the Nazi attack on Warsaw, he
went to Vilna, reaching the city
after great difficulty, and re-
mained there to chronicle the
tragic events of the tragedies
imposed by the Nazis.
He describes, in daily
sequence, the panic that struck
Vilna Jewry when they learned
of the German attack on Rus-
sia in 1941. He gives an account
of the destruction, of the fright
that invaded the ghetto in
which Jews were confined, of
the revelations of the • Nazi
plans for the extermination of
the Jewish people.

Kruk's diary of '757 pages
was dictated to. Mrs. Mendel-
sund-Kowarsky, now of New
York. She typed it in three
copies. One was buried in a
tin can in a bunker—a prac-
tice Jewish historians re-
sorted to during the Nazi
horrors in efforts to preserve
the facts and the testimony
against the murderers. When
Vilna was liberated, Abraham
Sutskever, the Yiddish poet,
went in search for that copy.
The can was empty, but pages
of the manuscript were strewn
throughout the bunker.

These pages, numbering 380,
were gathered and brought to
New York. Part of the missing
pages was • completed from a
fragment of 130 pages now in
the Archives of Jerusalem. The
rest missing. What has been re-
trieved forms the text of Kruk's
posthumous "Diary of the Vilna
Ghetto."
The diary ended abruptly
under date of July 13, 1943.
Kruk had been taken to Estonia
and died at the age of 47, in

DOM

Nazi flames on Sept. 18 or 19,
1944.
His diary depicts not only
tragedy but attempts by the
inmates of the Vilna ghetto to
create a cultural atmosphere
even in the midst of horrors.
School, theaters, a library were
attempted.
These are part of the story.
It is a deeply moving document.
It is a record of heroism and of
dignity — of suffering and de-

gradation.

In the ghetto deep interest
was taken in Jewish life. There-
is an episode of the news that
reached the interned about the
murder in Russia of Henrik
Ehrlich and Victor Alter, and of
the protests by Jewish workers
in New York. These and similar
incidents stirred the sufferers
as much as their own sufferings.
The bestialities shook them.
Some escaped. Some resisted
and died martyrs' deaths.
Kruk's story is not compl
but what had been pres
is a soul-stirring revelati
This book will be am the
documents that will e nally
point a finger of accusa n at
the Nazi beasts.

American-Israel Line
Carries Cargo Direct
from U.S. to East P

S

NEW YORK, (JT
The
American-Israeli Shipp
Co.,
United States represe
ive of
Zim Lines of Isr , an-
nounced that a new dir
cargo
services linking east
ports in the United States with
Japan, Hong Kong and the Phil-
ippines will be started ne
week.

The first westbound
ng
of the new service wi
e by
the 15,000-ton Israel- •
cargo
motorship, the Neg
which
will load at U.S.
st coast
ports for the far Ea' while its
sister ship, M/S Am • loads
in the far East for the
States. Sailings will be monthly
in both directions and the new
line creates a globe-girdling
network of shipping services
for Zim.
It was also announced that
Zim Lines had taken a three-
year lease on Pier 64 on the
Hudson River in Manhattan
and will move all of its opera-
tions from its present privately
owned base in Brooklyn. The
line will pay an annual rental
of $110,000 and a fee of one
dollar a long ton of cargo when
total cargo at the pier tops
110,000 tons annually.

MRS. JOEL ADELMAN

Judith Anne Rose was united
in marriage with Joel Stefan
Adelman Aug. 24 at Adas Shalom
Synagogue. Rabbi Segal and Can-
tor Fenak • officiated.
so
en
are
. and Mrs. E. Rose of
Sorrento Ave. and Mr. and Mrs.
Albert Adelman of Sussex A
The
e's
ivory p
chapel
fi gertip
was o
ory silk illus . •
e
carried
• stepha.;.
onfirrnati Zee.'
•e na , sister' of the
•egroom, was maid of honor.
Bridesmaids were Mrs. Ellen
Burnstein, sister of the bride
Evelyn Meral,
a
Mrs.
e
ar
Best
Join F •
Ushe
ere avi
n,
Martin o
the bride,
and David Stein

ing a hong Se.
York and the New Engl
states, the couple will reside i
Ann Arbor where the bride-
groom will conti e his studies
at the if Michigan
Law S

Urge Polish Property
Claimants to File Now

All persons eligible to file
claims under the Polish Claims-
Agreement are advised by the
World Jewish Congress to com-
plete the requisite froms as
soon as possible.
The terminal date for filing is
Sept. 30, but it is not necessary
that claims be fully documented
and established at the time of
filing. Andrew T. McGuire, gen-
eral counsel of the Foreign
Claims Settlement Commission
of the United States, has ad-
vised the World Jewish Con-.
gress that documents supporting
claims may be submitted even
after Sept. 30, if not available at
the time of filing.
Claimants must use official
forms which are available only
at the Foreign Claims Settle-
ment Commission of the United
States, Washington 25, D.C.
Persons who may need assist-
ance in filing their claims, are
advised to consult an attorney.

ds bring fast results!

S Idon Rott

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