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August 25, 1961 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1961-08-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

`Adam to Daniel . - Dramatic Old Testament Survey

set down in writing for many ditions of the Book of Joshua Jerusalem. Ancient Near Eastern
texts are quoted here, as well as
centuries, it is pointed out that supplement the story.
Prior to undertaking the in previous chapters, supplement-
the Hebrews retained an "oral
tradition." Discussing "Pre - His- evaluation of the first two cen- ary to the references to the bib-
tory in the Bible," we are told: turies in Canaan—the period lical texts. The fall of Jerusalem
Israeli archaeologists, histori- to the editor, is intended to gro- "Traditions handed down by the of the rule of the Judges, the and the abysmal sorrow describ-
ans and Bible scholars have par- vide the reader with a well-docu- Hebrews tell nothing of the rise epic of Deborah, Gideon's ex- ed in Lamentations, Jeremiah's
ticipated in the monumental com- mented, illustrated and condens- and fall of empires that took ploits, Samuel, the rise of the prophecies and the complaints
pilation, "Adam to Daniel—an ed picture of the Bible world. To place between the time when Philistines—an important chap- against injustice by Habakkuk
Illustrated Guide to the Old Tes- reach a proper understanding of civilization began in Mesopotamia ter is devoted to the laws of are highlights of one of the clos-
tament and Its Background," antiquity, he points to the need and the time of the migration of early Israel. "Collective life as ing chapters.
"It was Jeremiah and Ha-
edited by Gaalyahu Cornfeld and for assessing storytelling by song, the first Hebrew tribesmen to illustrated by the covenant",
bakkuk who originated the
Pentateuchal law as classified
published by Macmillan. It is an legend and recitation. It is folk- Canaan." We are told:
great debate against idolatry of
8 x 11, 560-page highly scholarly lore that provides basic ideas of
by German and Scandinavian
"The very charming story of
the nations," according to Y.
research, and other legal codes,
Work enhanced by valuable pho- history. .
the original building of the
Because the Hebrews' story "is mighty tower of Babel is etio-
in relation to Oriental law, are 1 Kaufman, the editors of "Adam
tographs, printed in Israel.
to Daniel" state. Now religion
The most eminent Christian a phenomenon in the history of logical: It was an explanation
under review.
scholars contributed their advice religion," it is relevant in the by later generations to account
Chapters like "Tribalism and became denationalized and uni-
in the gathering of this material field of theological interpreta- for the fact that mankind— Nayionhood add to an under- versal.
Then came the dawn of a new
for this most impressive work, Lion. The perspective of modern which stems from one family standing of monarchial rule in
and institutions of prominence scholarship as well as of the his- of Noah—developed so many Israel and the influence upon the era in exile, in Babylonia, with
assisted in the effort, by provid- tory of the Bible and its folk are mutually unintelligible lan- kingdom exerted by priests and the prophecies of Ezekiel, "the
architect of restoration." . This
accounted for in this noteworthy guages . . . It is an echo .. . prophets.
ing photographs and data.
Dealing with "The Golden also was the period of the Second
A "background as understood book.
of one of the first migrations
The editor maintains that
in Israel" is resorted to be-
of human history in the pre- Age," the authors describe the Isaiah, of the universal God
the Bible is "a living force in
cause, as the editor in chief
history of Iran and Mesopo- rise of Jerusalem as Israel's against the idols, of the preach-
the modern west." This, too,
capital and as "the City of David." ments of the world's divine gov-
explains, "living in the land of
tamia."
is part of the consideration in
the Bible and speaking the
In the chapter on "Abraham" i This is the chapter in which is ernment.
The Second Isaiah's acclama-
the preparation of this new is described the first Hebrew described the end of the Philis-
Bible's own language, scholars
biblical work for moderns.
migration from Mesopotamia, the tine threat to Judaea. The "liter- tion of Cyrus, the Persian king
in Israel gain a closer under-
This is the chronological order coming of the Amorites, the story ary character of Hebrew history who made possible the return and
standing of the meaning of the
words and patterns of the in which the editor has arranged of the Hittites, the Biblical tradi- in David's time" and the poetic restoration, Cayrus' phenomenal
text"; and "because of their in- "Adam to Daniel": He begins tion of Abraham's wanderings forms achieved by the Hebrew career and edict of liberation,
timate knowledge of the in- with the Pentateuch; proceeds viewed an early invasion of Psalms are among the data in Ezra's evaluation of the attempt
digenous cultural setting, they with the historical books of Josh- Palestine—all leading up to a this chapter. It is followed by a at restoration and the subsequent
are apt to have a cleared in- ua, Samuel, Kings and Chroni- review of the religious beliefs of description of Solomon's wealth end of a dream comprise the
sight into the ways of thinking cles; then turns to the prophetic the early Hebrews. The covenant and power, Solomon's diplomatic collection of data in a stirring
of the ancient Hebrews and the writings of Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, of circumcision is placed hi the relations with other nations, the chapter. It concludes with the pe-
forms of their social organiza- Jeremiah and the other prophets context of patriarchal days. building of the Temple, the ship- riod of Queen Esther of Susa.
"The Emerging Judaism" eval-
in their group; outlines the last
Here, too, we have commen- ping in Solomon's time, the in-
tion."
uates the works of Ezra and Ne-
Use was made, therefore, "of section of the Bible, the "Writ- taries on the Sodom and Gomor- dust-ries he established.
The folkloric element in hemiah. Then there is a chapter
all the resources of archaeology, ings" — Job, Proverbs, Ecclesi- rah destruction, on Abraham's
ancient languages and modern astesand finally discusses Dan- sojourn in the Negev, on the sac- Solomon's Song of Songs is on Jewish Wisdom literature—
biblical research," and compari- iel as "an example of apocalyptic rifice of Isaac. The latter's career charmingly delineated, with Proverbs and Job—and finally
son was made of Bible stories literature which emerged in the is traced to the manner in which, quotations from The Song, to there is the chapter on Daniel
period between the Old and New during a famine, he turned to indicate that "The Song of under the title "The End of the
with contemporary literature.
Songs reaches its climax and Old Testament." The signifi-
Describing the advances that Testaments."
agriculture.
"Genesis" is viewed "through
"The Saga of Jacob," the deserves a place of honor cance of the Dead Sea Scrolls is
have been made in the field of
biblical interpretation through re- the eyes of the .ancients," and in Jacob-Laban cycle, the story of among the best poetry of all recognized and the authors con-
clude with a statement on "The
cent archaeological excavations, describing the Hebrew conception Rachel the shepherdess, Jacob's time."
the editor makes this important of the universe. the authors turn nocturnal encounter, the Joseph Analyses of the prophecies of Old Testament View of World
to related sources and other story-cycle, an historical evalua- Israel commence with the chap- History," in which they state:
comment:
"The biblical concept of one
"Israeli students tend to re- writings in ancient Near Eastern tion of Joseph's residence in ter dealing with the divided king-
gard the biblical text as an un- texts, using appropriate illustra- Egypt and the early history of dom. Israel's conflicts with its God is a human responsibility
usually accurate and reliable tions to clarify biblical narra- Egypt are portions of enlighten- neighbors, rulers and prophets and consequently an obligation
account of the events of an- tives—Eden, the tree of knowl- ing chapters which conclude with pass in review here. The chronol- upon all nations.- That is why
cient history and as the inte- edge, and other factors. Babylo- resumes of the passing of the ogy of the divided kingdom and it is incumbent upon them all,
the accompanying maps assist the according to this concept, to
gral foundation of constructive nian and other texts are used in patriarchal age.
be like 'Israel' in spirit and to
criticism based upon the psy- the clarifications.
reader.
Bondage in Egypt, exodus and
Similar procedure is followed the birth of a nation are unfold-
Then came the fall of Israel accept the faith of Israel .. .
chological and social patterns
a
of the Bible, guided by relevant in the chapter that follows, "The ed in dramatic fashion, again by and "Judah Alone" describes the Classical prophecy marked
Twenty Generations from Adam resort to data related to the bib- final era of independence. The stage in the development of
modern research."
"Adam to Daniel", according to Abraham." Since no record was lical facts. The episodes in the struggles with Assyria and with world civilization and also the
life of Moses are especially in- Egypt are part of the tragic story transition between the beliefs
of antiquity and apocalyptic lit-'
triguing. His contests with Pha- of ancient times.
Linked with the story' of the erature . . . As the estimate .
roah, use of magic, travels in the
wilderness, the naming of the fall of Zion is the prophets' call of the power and moral char-
covenant, his people's discontent, for social justice. The character- acter of their God developed,
the struggles along the wander- istics of the prophets are out- so the idea that Israel was His
ings, and a score of other devel- lined and their appeals for justice peculiar people expanded until ,
opments are delinated as part of quoted from the biblical texts. it produced a world view ac-
High spiritual values emerged cording to which their God was
history.
Then comes the story of the in the battle against magic and the omnipotent ruler of the
conquest and the settlement. idolatry and "The Voice of Is- universe, and his people, Is-
3 ., pt? nrgx j ;t r iamp
Poems and ancient echoes from rael's Conscience" speaks of the rael, the center of world his-
East
of the Jordan and the tra- reforms that were instituted for tory."
7
n
lls;
"Adam to Daniel" is a dra-
true worship.
"The Doom of the Nation" de- matic account of biblical history.
1.714 Hebrew Corner
scribes "the final disaster" and It is a book of great merit.
„Try ?1)
—P. S.
the tragedy during the siege of


Scholcerly Work Is 'Guide to Old
Testament and Its Background'

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Summer in Israel

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Every summer thousands of . Jewish
youth from the diaspora come to
Israel to spend their vacation in an
Israeli atmosphere, also using their
time for study of Judaism, the
geography of the country, for work in
the Kibbutzim, and trips to all parts
of the country. The happy memories
of this summer vacation are not for•
gotten. In Israel they meet other
Jewish youth and make new friends.
The trip is organized by the Sum-
mer Institute of the Department for
Youth and Hehalutz Zionist Organiza-
tion. This year about two thousand
youth are coming for a period of
seven weeks. The largest group num-
bering 800 is coming from the United
States. Three hundred ninty are
coming from England, 50 from
France, the rest from ten different
countries.
This year there is an interesting
group, coming on the basis of a Bar
Mitzva fund. Three years ago the
members of this group received bank
savings checks, they saved their
money till they were of age to be
able to come to I s r a el with an
organized group. The first group
comes from Toronto, Canada.
The participants spend two weeks
and a half in general study and
geography of the country. For two
weeks and a half they visit the
country from Dan to Eilath, and for
two weeks, work in agricultural
settlements. This year over a hun-
dred Israeli youth directors will take
care of the groups of the Summer
Institute. The youth directors are stu-
dents of the Hebrew University. In
the future special courses are being
planned for the youth directors of the
summer Institute, for it is not easy
to find directors that know many
languages for work only during 2-3
summer months.
Translation of Hebrew column
Published by Brith Ivrith Olamith
Jerusalem

Israel Sends Top Leaders to U.S.
to Seek Housing Aid for Immigrants

JERUSALEM, (JTA)—Giora
Josephthal, minister of labor,
and Aryeth Pinkus, treasurer
of the Jewish Agency, will
leave for the United States to
raise extra. funds, within the
framework of the United Jew-
ish Appeal, to meet Israel's
housing needs for increased
immigration expected here dur-
ing the current fiscal year.
The target for funds to be
needed for housing of immi-
grants has been raised to
200,000,000 Israeli pounds
($112,000,000).
The Government Housing Ad-
ministration has announced
measures for restricting non-
essential construction, so as to
assign labor and materials pri-
orities to immigrant housing.
In line with the announce-
ment the Labor Ministry will
halt the construction of various
public building projects ear-
marked for this year at a total
cost of 30,000,000 p o.0 n d s
($16,800,000) and will divert the
allocations, manpower and ma-
terials for the speedy construe-

tion of housing units to accom-
modate recent arrivals.
Among the construction pro-
jects to be halted in accordance
with the. new decision may be
work on the new building for
the Knesset as well as other
government and municipal pro-
jects. During the first five
months of the current fiscal
year, the ministry spent dou-
ble the original estimates for
housing new immigrants and
by the end of the fiscal year
next March 31; it is expected
that such expenditures will in-
crease four-fold.
The new measure with regard
to building restrictions caused
an immediate increase in prices
for dwellings being built by
private contractors, as well as
for building materials, despite
government assurances that the
new restrictions will not affect
private building but are aimed
only at public construction like
the Knesset building here and
the Hall of Justice at Tel Aviv.
Israelis were rushing to buy
private dwellings.

4

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