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July 01, 1960 - Image 23

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1960-07-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,

:41111111111811111111.111.11.18111NOW

(Editor's N o t e: Meyer
Levin, noted author of the
current best-seller "Eva" and
other novels, in a special
assignment for Israeli Science
Features and News recently
interviewed Dr. Mathilde
Krim, the beautiful scientist
associated with the Weizmann
Institute of Science at Reho-
vot. Here are some of the
highlights of the interview.)
* :1: *
By MEYER LEVIN

We sat in a second floor sit-
ting room of an elegant little
house on Manhattan's East Riv-
er. Dr. Mathilde Krim—as pho-
togenic as a youthful Ingrid
Bergman—and I spoke of her
work, which has ranged from
analysis of the sex structure of
the cell to her present absorp-
tion with the analysis of cancer
virus.
In all this, though her labo-
ratory is now set up in the di-
vision of virus research at New
York City's Cornell Medical
School, she is still very much
a part of the Rehovot team, as
she has been since she came
for the first time to Israel. Her
ties with the Weizmann Insti-
tute of Science are more than
professional. Arthur Krim, her
husband, is an active member
of the Institute's board of gov-
ernors, and the Krims, for the
past year or so, have commuted
between New York and Rehovot.
I had gone to see Dr. Krim
because of the subject matter
of her current research. From
all corners of the world, there
have come, in recent months,
predictions of a breakthrough
in the urgent battle against can-
cer; predictions based on the
new approach in virus research.
Dr. Krim explained the facts.
The first connection between
virus and cancer was establish-
ed as long as 50 years ago,
chiefly by Peyton Rous who had
obtained virus from a tumor of
a chicken, and, by injecting it
into another bird of the same
breed, had succeeded in produc-
ing a parallel tumor. But the
line of investigation almost pe-
tered out; and many attempts to
extract viruses from other tu-
mors gave mostly negative re-
sults.
In 1955, two American re-
searchers found that there was
a much more active virus which
produced cancer in many faring,
and in different animals. Also,
it could be maintained in tissue
culture. It proved effective in
mice, rabbits, hamsters, and
rats. Cancers were produced in
salivary glands, kidneys, bone,
mammary glands, hair follicles
and other organs. For its multi-
tude of effects, the material was
named the polyoma virus.
It opened a vast field of re-
search. Part of this was done
in Rehovot, and Mathilde Krim
was a member of that research
team. The basic problems to be
resolved were as multitudinous
as the polyoma's effects. Are
viruses involved in the origin
of all tumors? Haw are viruses
transmitted? What is the nature
of cell-virus interaction? Does
the virus itself cause the forma-
tion of a tumor, or does it acti-
vate some other mechanism?
Once the tumor is formed, is
the virus necessary for its con-
tinuation?
"Already," said Dr. Krim,
"we have found an important
distinction between the cancer
virus and a virus such as that
which produces polio." In polio,
it was discovered that when one
cell is infected with virus, it
releases hundreds of virus part-
icles in a few hours. But, in her
studies of tumor cells induced
by polyoma virus, Dr. Krim has
found that each tumor cell re-
leases only five particles of
virus in 24 hours. The virus
would seem to have been incor-
porated into the genetic appa-
ratus of the tumor cell.
Results and questions like
these traverse the distance be-
tween Dr. Krim and her "boss"

DR. MATHILDE KRIM

in Rehovot, Dr. Leo Sachs, with
whom she has worked since
1954.
Upon such delicate, expert
peering and probing hang uni-
versal hopes. No one, least of
all Dr. Krim, will venture a
guess as to the when or the how
of victory against cancer. But in
the close and intense study of
the virus mechanism within the
cell—in the heart of the dread
malady—may well lie the an-
swer to its defeat.

Israel Policeman
Slain by Syrians

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire to
The Jewish News)

TEL AVIV — Israel officials
charged Wednesday that Syrian
gunners ignored repeated
United Nations observer appeals
to stop shooting Tuesday after
their fire wounded an Israel
border policeman, making it im-
possible to reach the wounded
man.
Sources said the firing lasted
75 minutes. The wounded Is-
raeli died en route to a hospital.
Israeli members of the nearby
collective kibbutz Tel Katzair
resumed their usual work
Wednesday morning in the
vineyard near the site of the
shooting.
UN observers expressed sur-
prise at the unprovoked Syrian
outbreak in the Bet Katzir sec-
tion near the border which
came after months of relative
quiet.
The dead man, Shmuel Ben
Arieh of Affulah, left a wife
and two children.

2 Buffalo Congregations
Expand School Facilities

BUFFALO, N.Y., (JTA) —
Two Buffalo synagogues were
busy with school expansion
programs this week.
Temple Beth El's surburban
school will be ready for re-
ligious school classes in the
fall. The school buildings will
also be used for services. It
will have class and meeting
rooms, a library, a kindergar-
ten, kitchen and an air-
conditioned auditorium seating
500.
Ah av as A chi m-Lubav i tz Syna-
gogue will build a school next
to its present building to pro-
vide 270 children of congrega-
tional families with permanent
school facilities. It will have
six classrooms, a library and
an office and will be ready
Sept. 1.

Artist Max Weber Gives
Painting to Brandeis U.

"Whither Now," by Max
Weber, a painting motivated by
the eminent artist's reaction to
the Nazi attack on the Berlin
Jewish community in Novem-
ber, 1938, has been presented
to Brandeis University by Mr.
and Mrs. Weber.
The painting, which becomes
part of the university's perma-
nent art collection, portrays two
Jewish patriarchs praying for a
homeland as the answer to the
ancient problem of Jewish
homelessness.

Danny Raskin's

LISTENING

A PROUD BOY is Detroiter
Bryan Kahn, who arrived last
week from Fort Knox, Tenn.,
where he has just completed
basic training . . . "I may be
just a number now," says Bryan,
who walks around town wear-
ing the uniform of Uncl' Sam
as if it was the Congressional
Medal of Honor, "but corny or
not I'm now qualified to be a
real fighter in the United States
Army." .. . Bryan, who is par-
entless, enlisted on his 17th
birthday last April 18, and ex-
tolls his gratefulness for the
opportunity to complete his
s^hooling which the army af-
fords him ... and also to prove
to himself the exten4 of his
capabilities which heretofore
were unkown . . . "This is only
the beginning," comments the
now confident Bryan as he
points to the sharpshooting
medal on his expanded chest
. . . While on furlough, Bryan
is staying with his aunt and
uncle, Sarah and Max Thomas
on Santa Barbara . . . and as
proud as he is, they're even
prouder of him!
*


Lefkowitz Raps Apathy Toward Hate Peddlers

KIAMESHA LAKE, N.Y.,
(JTA) — Louis J. Lefkowitz,
attorney general of New York
State, warned here today that
"insiduous peddlers of hate and
discrimination are the front line
enemies of freedom."
Speaking before delegates
representing 275 Brith Abra-
ham lodges throughout the
country, attending the recent
73rd annual convention of the
national fraternal order, Lefko-
witz emphasized that the Amer-
ican people's "complacency
gives courage to the apostle of

group hatred."
The convention unanimously
adopted a resolution, proposed
by Grand Master Maurice Gold-
stein, urging. Israel to stand
firm in its refusal to return
Adolf Eichmann to Argentina.

MUSIC! ENTERTAINMENT!

Sammy Woolf

And His Orchestro

UN 3-8982

UN 1-2953

UN 3-6501

DELICATESSEN

RESTAURANT

PERRI'S'

—gottoe O

ite

21 eficacie:i

r

Going to ... or coming from
the lake . . . stop at PERRI'S
for a snack or delicious dinner,
where you'll always find
QUALITY plus QUANTITY

Delicacies From The
Four Corners of The World

Artistic Buffet Tray
Catering for Any Party u 9-5535
or Social Gathering

IN

NORTHWOOD CENTER

Open
8 a.m.-
10 p.m.
Sundays
a nd Daily

Woodward at 13-Mile and Coolidge

WHERE TO DINE

FOR ABOUT FIVE years,
Rabbi Avrohom Freedman of CLAM SHOP and BAR
TR 2-8800
the Yeshivath Beth Yehudah Serving. Oysters, Clams, LOBSTERS, Steaks and Assorted Sea Foods
has led a study group in Torah Music by Muzak
2675 E. GRAND BLVD.
and Jewish philosophy which
meets each week . . . Regular
Prime Beef at its Very Best! Pies baked on prem-
Luncheons and Dinners. Menus changed
attendees include Solomon Le- nElics ises. Special
daily. Open 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
vine, Eugene Goldberg, Frank
19371 W. 8 Mile, 1 Blk. E. of Evergreen
Leiderman, Milt Gilman, Dr. BEEF BUFFET
Lester Zeff and a number of
Dancing 6 nights. Monday, Dixieland;
others who attend occasionally
Chicorels'
Don Pablo (5 Nights)
. . . The group is now engaged
5 p.m. Banquet Parties to 100.
Kenwood Dinners
in an intensive study of Gene-
Free Parking — OPEN SUNDAYS
sis . . . Rabbi Freedman also
KE. 7-7377
FENKELL
COR.
TELEGRAPH
teaches a women's study group
bi-weekly . . . He does all this
in addition to a heavy load as
• Prime Beef • Shrimp • Lobster • Delmonico Steak • Chicken
principal at the Yeshiva . .
UN 4-7897
13300 W. 7 M!LE cor. -lTTLEFIELD
and takes no money for his
OPEN DAILY 11 8:30 P.M.; SAT & SUN. to 9 P.M.
RESERVATIONS NOW BEING ACCEPTED FOR
extra-curricular activities 1 1
STAGS, BANQUETS and MEETINGS
He is- an extremely pious man
Fine American & litalian Food
who gives of himself to every-
Open daily 11:30 a.m.-1 a.m.
one in the spiritual and physical
CLOSED SUNDAYS
sense ... and folks know him
Banquet room available
COCKTAIL BAR
to be available to all, morning,
TO 9-3988
17632 WOODWARD — North of 6 Mile
noon or night . . . It is not in-
frequent to have Rabbi Freed-
man's phone ring late into the
29501 NORTHWESTERN HWY bet. 12 & 13 Mile
evening with requests for finan-
Open Daily 9 A.M. - 9 P.M. Closed Mondays
Serving
Chicken & Turkey Luncheon and Dinner
cial help for some needy family
CARRY OUT SERVICE — PRIVATE ROOM AVAILABLE
. • . and in the true spirit of
EL 6-9222
SQUARE DANCE PARTIES
his profession and nature, he is
Lavish SMORGASBORD with finest mar.
never known to refuse a help-
inated and smoked fish, dozens of hot and
cold dishes. Complete Continental Kitchen
ing hand whenever possible.
—steaks, chops, lobsters, duck, etc. Beautiful private dining rooms for
* * *
Parties. Home and business catering. Lunch from $1.25. Dinner from $2.95.

DUBBS BEEF BUFFET

Paradiso Cafe

McINERNEY'S FARM and OLD CIDER MILL

Stockholni

DR. MARTIN ,TROTSKY re- FREE PARKING 1014 E. JEFFERSON WO 2-1042
3020 GRAND RIVER Free Parking TE 3-0700. Pri-
ceived his diploma at Harper
vate Banquet Rooms for wedding parties. Seriring
Hospital for completing his
the World's Finest Steaks. Chops and Sea Foods fox
more than 26 years. All Beef aged in our cellars.
medical training as an ear, nose
and throat 'specialist . . and CHOP HOUSE
a week later left to specialize
ROBIN HOOD'S serving the finest and most delicious of foods, Steaks,
for Uncle Sam at Fart Dix, Chops, Chicken Club Sandwiches. .ihort Orders. Delicious Hamburgers.
N J Marty will have his "Served as you like it."
wife Judy, son Michael, 3, and
Open 24 Hours
17-month-old d a u g h t e r, Lori 20176 LIVERNOIS AVE., 11/2 blks. S. 8 Mile Rd.
Gayle, to accompan- him.

20600 PLYMOUTH,
1 Mi. E. of Telegraph
Open 7 Days A Week
Jewish Unity Is 'Crucial' in

CARL'S

Next Decade—Neumann

Luncheons — Dinners — Cocktails
Dancing, Entertainment
Beautiful Banquet Room, accommodating up to 400 Guests

ANTWERP (JTA) — The
"crucial" problem facing world
FOR RESERVATIONS: BR 2-3040
Jewry in the coming decade is
CHOICE LIQUORS
"the unity of the Jewish people
AN QUET FACILITIES
MARIA'S PIZZERIA
in Israel and the Jews outside
Specializing in Pizza Pie and Famous Italian Foods
of Israel," Dr. Emanual Neu-
Parking Facilities . . . Carry-Out Service
mann, president of the World
Confederation of General Zion- 7101 PURITAN—Open 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.—UN 1-3929
ists, told 100 delegates repre-
The Cundari reach the finest
cuisine in a continental back-
senting eight countries at the
ground with a choice of Amer-
opening session of the Euro-
ican
ican and European specialties.
pean Conference of General
11 a..m - 3 p.m.; Din-
Zionists here. He appealed for
ners 6-10 p.m. After-Theatre 'SIC
an interchange of ideas between
Snacks 'till 4 a.m.
Jews in Israel and those living
20021 W. McNichols cor. Evergreen — For Reservations — KE 3-2766
in other countries.

23 - THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS — Friday, July 1, 1960

Beautiful Dr. Krim Aids in Fight
on Cancer at Weizmann Institute

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