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April 29, 1960 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1960-04-29

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U. S. Labor's Reply to Nasser

THE JEWISH NEWS

July 20, 1951
h Chr onicle commencing with issue s of Association,
Jewis
Detroit
the
National
Inc orp ating
English--Jewish Newspapers. Michigan Pres

Member American Association
Editorial Association.
Published every Friday by The
Mich., VE 8-9364. Subscription $5 a
Entered as second class matter
II, 1879.

PHILIP SLOMOVITZ

Editor and Publisher

of
Mile Road, Detroit 35,
Jewish News Publishing Co. 17100 West Seven
act of Congress of March
year. Foreign"$6.
Aug. 6. 1942 at Post Office, Detroit, Mich. under

SIDNEY SHMARAK

CARM1 M. SLOMOVITZ

Circulation Manager

Advertising Manager

FRANK SIMONS

City Editor

Sabbath Scriptural Selections
Scriptural selections will be
third
day
of /gar, 5720, the following
This Sabbath, the
Ki:ags
Lev. 12:1-15:33. Prophetical portion,
read in our synagogues.
Pentatenchal portion, Tatria Metzora,
.
7:3-20.
Israel Independence Day, Monday

Licht Benshen, Friday, April 29. 7:10

Page Four

VOL. XXXVII. No. 9

p.m.

April 29, 1960



Happy Twelit BirthcIay to Israel

To Israel and its courageous people, we extend heartiest congratulations on
the twelfth
the State. took place during the 12 years of the Israelis'
Many anniversary
memorable of
occurrences
1 peoples who allied them-
survival. Antagonistic neighbors, unfriendly
for the State's enemies, and the cpmplacency even of the friendliest nations
st rugles ith
w
to the concern of Israel over its future.
oung State has made
contributed
obstacles and handicaps, they
In spite of the many
d economcally,
it
is
making
rapid progress cul-
i
marked progress. It has advance etains its sense of dignity and self4estraint even
turally
and scientifically,
and it defensively
r
in its constant
efforts to remain
strong, in order to prevent the destruc-
u
tion and the extermination threatened byunwise
neighbors.
Israel's kinsmen played an important role in the State's development. We
have been
partners
in an
historic
undertaking.
Now,
as Israel
enters
the Bar
Mitzvah year of notable achievements,
, to assist it in is 1
our respony
to
continue
our
concern
over
the
Israelis'
realhundreds
of 'The Midstream Reader'
sec
sibilit development and to assure the settlement of additiona
their economic
thousands of homeless Jews who continue tlook to Israel a§ their haven of refuge.
Israel's friends must not become too complacent. Much remains
to be done
to
o function
with-
Collection
guarantee the security of the new State, to make it possible for it family
out hindrance, to enable it to remain a wholesome member
of
the
of
nations.,
eng
a challce
s e to strengthen the
The twelfth anniversary therefore carries with it assuran
to the defenders of
le
ago,
in
time
of stress or w
Midstream, the Jewish quarterly, founded five years
ethe r
.
e
the Jewish State that we shall not
has emerged as one of the major literary efforts of American
. let thas down,
.
of an au t on omous stat
citizens wh
has published val
h
-sponsored, the ma,az
they are
striving
to improve
a
leading Jewish writers
Our
greeting
to Israel their
must s take
the form of continued cooperation
with
e
srae, which! Jews. Zionist
h Camp Iaign
short stories and poems by the
l
Bond
United Jewish Appeal, by our generous giving to the by
Allied
Jewis
strengthening the
in the world.
a
.
in Israel. It 1
. es a major portion of its income to the UJA:
. Elves
Major selections from the Midstream issues now are avail
prove
...
t proj ects
ial
ff (1 1 E.
d
Yoselo
a
efforts and
s by joining in the numerous industr
of Israel' twelfth birthday able in a single volume, published by
The
36th St., N. Y. 16), under the title "The Midstream Reader."
is in such fashion that we can best share in the !joy
collection was ably edited by Shlomo Katz.
*
celebration. •
"The Changing
Commencing with the challenging essay,

of Essays, Poems,

Stories

by Eminent Writers

r


rae is

DLit

To Loosen the Noose

nt issue of The Reporter,
I n the cut
in an article entitled "The Noose Around
Israel," William S. Ellis, managing editor
'
of the Beirut, Lebanon, Daily News, de -
scribes the extent to which Arabs have
gone to enforce the boycott against Is-
rael. He shows how the boycott "covers
the high_ seas," how it has forced the
Renault withdrawal, and the manner in
which films featuring Elizabeth Taylor,
Danny Kaye, Edward G. Robinson, Eddie
Fisher, Marilyn Monroe, Jerry Lewis and
others are being banned in Arab coun-
tries.
In the course of his expose of the tragic
campaign against Israel, Ellis makes these
observations:

Most of the stars were banned for partici-
pating in rallies for the sale of Israel bonds.
In the case of Louis Armstrong, it was first
reported that he had been banned because
he was "a spy for Israel." When the absurdity
a the allegation finally struck home, the
reason was altered to read "aiding the cause
of Zionism." What had actually happened was
that Armstrong had simply performed in
Israel.
"Ben Hur" will not be shown in Beirut or
in any other Arab city. The reason: Haya
Harareet, who once won the title of Miss
Israel, has a role in the production.
When asked what he thought about the
film ban, Spyros Skouras, president of
Twentieth Century-Fox, who was in Beirut
recently, said, "Well, I'm against mixing art
and politics." The ironic thing is that the
majority of Arabs, especially those living in
Lebanon, agree with him.
Lebanon is regarded as the weak sister
in the anti-Israel boycott campaign. The
government denies that, of course, but there
were many red faces when Monaheem Saadi,
a Beirut merchant, was arrested for import-
ing a brand of watches made by a blacklisted
factory. And then there was the time, late
last year, when 256 Italian motor scooters
made by a factory that deals with Israel were
seized in Beirut.
When the ban against Danny Kaye was
announced, a theater owner in Beirut, who
was showing a Kaye film at the time, took
the position that the ban "doesn't become
effective until our schedule calls for a change
of films."
Beirut blushed again recently, but this
time it was because of a bit of anti-Israel

a ble Jewish scholar, Dr .
Status of American Jewry," by
Judd L. Teller, the series of articles in the book cover the
"1 • the expanding interests of
vast panorama of is sues in
American
the Jews of this country. The dilemmas facing the
Jewry are delineated by Dr. Teller with the skill
acquired in his many years of activities as a 1 writer
news
of far Jew-
e
a s
ish pe riodicals and newspapers, ant in the official ranks
servic e anti as an active particip
of th e Jewish Agency.
Will Herberg, whose analytical works on the various
upon
Dr.
religions have given him authoritative status, touches Israel
another serious issue in the essay "The `Chosenness' of
a
the Jews of Today." He deals with "chosenness" as
the
and
calling, as a summons to service, and "the protests of
unwanted distinction." His conclu-
recalcitrant Jew against the
are
sion, however, is of importance as a guide to those who
confused over "the chosen people" assignation. He states:,_
"To the traditional Jew, the `chosenness' of Israel was a
central fact, ever present in his consciouness. The kiddush he
a-
repeated on Sabbaths and festivals was a constant proclamhe
,
tion of it; in the Alenu, the climax of the daily liturgy of it.
thanked God for it; in every prayer, he was reminded
We can just about imagine how much Indeed, no phase of his life was without some acknowledge-
of
raving and storming there would in- ment of the `chosenness' of Israel. It was the cornerstone
had Israel been guilty of such in- his personal ex istence as a Jew, as it was of the corporate
humanity-,
humanity, had Isral acted so stupidly existence of Jewry.
"For the Jew of today, everything has become problem-
as to ban Arab artists or to conduct a !
to
atic. Yet ultimately, the Jew of today, too, must come face to
campaign against Moslem ideas.
face
with
the
fact
of
his
Jewishness,
and
every
attempt
and
Israelis have bent backwards to en-
the question of `chosenness' be-
courage their neighbors' artistic en- do so almost at once raises `chosenness'
of Israel, whether
an answer. The
deavors, to invite them to join with them demands or
not, is an inescapable fact for the Jew. He cannot
For
in
in sponsoring mutual events. But al l the lieved
think or live as a Jew without in some way implying it. he
it confronts him as a destiny which
Israeli efforts have been to no avail.
better or for worse,
In fact, Arabs have refused to parti- cannot escape because he cannot escape himself and his

to evoke dis -
strategy seemingly calculated
E
en
the
boycott
office
forbore
to take

,,, credit
for the action. An app aratus for arti-
ficial breathing had been shipped from New
York to Israel. Before it left New York,
1 ow ever a Lebanese official in the United
States (the government was careful not to
mehow convinced the
reveal his nam e) so
shippers that the apparatus was to be chan-
the
neled through Beirut. When it got to
Lebanese capital it was, of course, confiscated.
Two young men who work as translators
for a newspaper in Beirut were discussing
the matter the day after the confiscation was ,
announced. One, a Lebanese from a village
near Tripoli, said, "We certainly have nothing
to be proud of as far as this is concerned."
The other translator is a Palestinian refugee.
He said: "In war, everything is fair game."
The two remarks tell the whole story of
the boycott simply and briefly.

cipate in United Nations' international history."
*
*
conferences in which the Israelis were
There is an essay on the Negro and the Jew, by Leslie A.
to, play some sort of role, and it was only Fiedler;
one on Soviet Jewry, by Reuben Ainsztein; an interest-
its
in instances in which the labor elements, ing article
on a kibbutz in Israel, which was quoted on
or genuine liberals, refused to yield to appearance in The Jewish News, by Edward L. Parsons; essays
Arab pressures, that such conferences on the Arabs, Jewish humor, Histadrut and a variety of other
were not disrupted by the actions of the subjects by Theodore Frankel, Mizra Kahn, Benjamin Akzin,.
P.
Howard Fast, Emanuel Neumann, Joe Carmichael, Abba
Arab spokesmen.
Lerner, Nathan Ben-Nathan, Ezra Spicehandler, Bernard Rosen-
Meanwhile, the attempt to tighten the
Gilbert Shapiro, Pierre VanPaassen and A. A. Sicroff.
noose around Israel goes on. It presents berg, Stories
in the volume are by I. Bashevis Singer, Yitzhak
(son
a challenge to the kinsmen of the Is- Shenhar, Avram
Davidson, Herbert Gold, Leo E. Litwak
raelis and to their friends—to strengthen of Detroiters Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Litwak), Isaac Rosenfeld, Wal-
Israel's hands economically, to encourage
Markfield, Maxine Steinman and Arthur Granit.
the constructive efforts which give Israel lace Poems are by Charles Reznikoff, Jacob Sloan, David Galler,
security, to purchase Israel Bonds and Yehu Arnichai, Jascha Kessler, Samuel Menashe, Irving Feld-
and
to invest in Israel's industrial projects.
Dannie Abse, David Ignatow, Isabella Fey, Leo Haber
da
Such activities show confidence in Israel man,
Shapiro.
and offer Israel the help she needs. That's Harvey
stimulus and provocation in the contents
There is much
Reader." Its contents are informative and
the way to loosen the noose and to shame
a
"The Midstre
those who would encourage acts of of
oking.
thought-provm
inhumanity.

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