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December 04, 1959 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1959-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

In a stirring address at the
dinner meeting of the Detroit
Israel Bond Committee, at Hotel
Stat.ler, Sunday evening, on his
first visit here since his recent
appointment as Israel's Ambas-
sador to the United States, Avra-
ham Harman reviewed the
events that led up to the emer-
gence of Israel in the historic
role of "the exorciser of the
curse of Jewish homeless," and
spoke with hope for the future
facing his country.
The new Ambassador, suc-
cessor to Abba Eban, was given
a rousing ovation by the large
audience. He was introduced by
Joseph Holtzman, for whom
this event marked his first ap-
pearance at a Jewish public
function here since his return
from England where he was
hospitalized for three months
for injuries sustained in an
automobile accident. Irwin I.
Cohn was chairman of the din-
ner.
Describing how the Israelis
are drawing new materials out
of the soil of their redeemed
land, Ambassador Harman de-
clared: "We are beginning to
balance our economy to lift
our people to a level that will
sustain them." He said that
"the mixed multitudes" that
have been gathered into Israel
have been put into production
so that now up to 70 per cent
of the country's food needs
are created by them.
Expressing gratitude to the
United States for the aid given
to Israel, Ambassador Harman
said: "We shall never forget
what your help means to us,
what we and others who had
won their independence owe to
the United- States. The spirit of
altruism, the leadership in free-
dom taken by your country, put
us in your debt. We are a small
people but we have very long
memories, and we never forget
mu' friends. We shall never be
found wanting."
Adding an expression of gra-
titude to the Jews of Detroit,
Harman said: "You have raised
our spirit, you have fortified our
strength with the flow of in-
vestment capital which will en-
able us to continue to build
and to produce. Nothing that
has happened in Israel in the
past 12 years would have been
possible without your partner-
ship, your interest, your con-
cern, and it will be remem-
bered."
These concerns, he added,
"impose upon us in Israel a
great responsibility to defend
our freedom, and we'll never
permit freedom to go down
before dictatorship." He ex-
pressed the hope that the
friendships and partnerships
between Israel, the United
States and American Jewry
will continue so that peace
can be attained—"a peace
that will be a great contribu-
tion to all mankind."
Ambassador Harman com-
menced his address by pointing
out that the date—Nov. 29—
marked the 12th anniversary
of the adoption of the Pales-
tine Partition Plan by the
United Nations, on Nov. 29,
1947. That resolution, "signal-
izing our right to live a life of
dignity, gave us the right to
have a land we would call our
own and to welcome into it the
uprooted and homeless," the
Ambassador said. "It was clear
to us that the international rec-

IF YOU TURN THE

n

i


1
I
UPSIDE DOWN YOU WON'T
FIND A FINER WINE THAN

Milan Wineries, Detroit, Mich.

UJA Study Mission Views Israel's 'Unmet Needs'

By ELIAHU SALPETER

(Copyright, 1959, Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, Inc.)
JERUSALEM—Five hundred

and eighty million dollars
sounds like quite a lot of
money. It is, even if it is spread
over a period of ten and one-
half years. Yet, that was the
amount received by the Jewish
Agency from Jewish donations
—mainly from the UJA—dur-
ing the period of Oct. 1, 1948, to
March 31, 1959.
But the sum spent by the
Agency on the reception, settle-
ment and absorption of the
close to one million immigrants
and on servicing the debts in-
curred in the process was al-
PHILLIP STOLLMAN (left)
and Israel Ambassador AVRA- most twice as much — $1,181,-
HAM HARMAN, at Israel 000,000, to be exact. Part of
Bond Dinner Here Last Sun- this difference came from par-
ticipation by the Israel govern-
day.
ment and from German repara-
ognition could not provide a tions. Part of it is still owed
foundation for our independ- by the Jewish Agency to vari-
ence, but that we would depend ous banks and institutions.
upon our own capacity to de-
This debt is again part of
fend that right."
the "unmet needs"—but only
Unfortunately, he added, "the a minor part. The larger part
problem of defense has not is not visible on books, but
ended for us, due to the pro- it is estimated to be in the
claimed hostility of our neigh- vicinity of $400,000,000. The
bors." The "threats of 1955 in- "unmet needs" are the houses
troduced new dimensions of which have not yet been built
warfare which forced us again for the tens of thousands of
to defend ourselves," he stated. immigrants who still live in
"After 12 years, we in
maabarot and other tempor-
Israel are conscious that the
ary buildings. They are the
process of peace is inevitable,"
livestock and the tractors
he declared. "Our State is an
promised to the new settlers
unshakable and inevitable fact,
to make their farms fully
and the Arab threats are no
self-supporting. They also in-
longer feasible. Regardless of
clude the loans promised to
the immorality of the Arab
the artisans and small manu-
threats, the Arabs must ac-
facturers among the new-
commodate themselves to that
comers to enable them to
fact and must find articula-
open workshops. Sometimes
tion. Then the log-jam will
the "unmet needs" represent
be removed, and the peace
the difference between a hard
process will open up."
life and a fairly decent one,
He declared that "Israel is sometimes • they form the
ready at all times for peace- tragic gap between despera-
making processes with our tion and hope, between the
Arab neighbors. It is nonsensi- sense of futility and the
cal for the Arabs to pour out vision of a brighter future.
their wealth and the years and
Now, for the first time, there
the lives of their people for is a slackening in the flow of
warfare when the whole area immigration, since the doors of
has one basic social and econ- those countries from where
omic problem—the great need tens and hundreds of thousands
for the material development of Jews would like to come to
of the area for all."
Israel, are closed. Every Israeli
Defense, he said, is Israel's hopes that the doors will be
first need, the second being opened soon, bulT in the mean-
to build the land. "The curse time the absorption of those
of Jewish homelessness has who have already arrived must
been a challenge to us, and be completed, both for the sake
our independence was needed of those already here and to
to exercise that curse and to prepare the country for the re-
create a place where Jews
ception of those yet to come.
How to meet the "unmet needs"
can go as of right."
Ambassador Harman was wel- is the central subject discussed
comed to Michigan in a tele- by the sixth annual study mis-
graphic message from Governor sion of the UJA to Israel.
Dr. Nahum Goldmann, chair-
G. Mennen Williams and in an
address of greeting, in behalf of man of the Jewish Agency and
the Governor and the State of
Michigan, by Lieutenant Gover- Bnai Brith Rushes Drugs
nor John B. Swainson.
in Answer to SOS Call
The program commenced with
A distress call relayed from
a welcome from the chairman
of the Detroit Israel Bond Com- Northern Rhodesia and inter-
mittee, Torn Borman. Greetings cepted by a ham operator in
also were extended by Mrs. Cincinnati enabled Bnai Brith
Joseph Katchke, co-chairman of to rush a shipment of r a r e
the Women's Division of the drugs to a critically-ill woman
Bond Organization. Rabbi Isra- in Ploesti, Rumania.
The operator, Michael Rich-•
el Halpern and Yaacov Homnick
gave the opening and closing man, a medical student in Cin-
prayers. Lois Act led in the sing- cinnati and a member of the
ing of the national anthems, ac- Bnai Br it h youth movement,
companied by Mrs. Norman notified the Jewish service
Allen,
organization of the urgent plea
Harry Cohen headed the for medicine used for treatment
committee of solicitors. Bond of a form of cancer.
awards were distributed by Max
Richman said the drugs, ac-
Osnos, Daniel Laven and Joseph cording to the Rhodesian opera-
Lee.
tor, were needed by a Golda
The sale of $112,000 worth Singer in Ploesti.
of Bonds boosted the Detroit
sales total for 1959 to $1,015,-
000, $300,000 of which are in Yiddish Culture Choir
for Brandeis University
pledges.
WALTHAM, Mass.—A trust
Louis . Levitan, manager of
the Detroit Israel Bond Office, fund to enhance teaching of the
stated that December is "Op- Yiddish language and culture
eration Cash Month," during has been established at Bran-
which all efforts must be made deis University by a New York
to transform the pledges into realtor.
The benefaction is the gift of
cash upon which Israel depends
in order to fulfill construction Jacob D. Berg, of 82-15 Britton
operations that have been under- Ave., Elmhurst, Long Island,
taken on the basis of the sums and will be known as the "Jacob
pledged for industrial invest- D. Berg Chair in Yiddish Cul-
ture."
ments.

president of the World Jewish tion to establish ,a relationship
Congress, in addressing mem- which would prevent the re-
bers of the Study Mission, drew currence of new crises in the
a fascinating parallel between future when the strains of a
the tasks facing East and West large-scale inflow of newcomers
and the tasks facing Israel and again reappear.
World Jewry: Just as the first
are now attempting to find a
way to put an end to a period
WILL DRAW
HAVE BOARD
of a recurring crisis which ever
MURRY
since the second World War
KOBLIN
threatened humanity with utter
ADVERTISING
destruction, so Israel and World UN. 1-5600
ART
Jewry must now utilize the
present lull in mass immigra-

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Detroit Welcomes Israeli
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