100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

November 20, 1959 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1959-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS— Friday, November 20, 1959-28

Inward Neglect, Not Anti-Semitism,
Threat to U. S. Jewry, Historian Says

BOSTON, (JTA)—Survival of
the Jewish people is threatened
not by anti-Semitism but by
neglect of the Jewish cultural
heritage, Dr. Solomon Grayzel,
editor of the Jewish Publicaa-
tion Society, told delegates of
the Women's Division, Ameri-
ca Jewish Congress, meeting for
Its biennial convention here.
Among the Detroit repre-
sentatives at the parley are
Mrs. William Cohen, president
of the Detroit Women's Divi-
sion, and Mesdames Jack Ross.
Jack Miller, Sol Redstone, David
Fleischman, John Sturman, Her-
man Karmann, Harry Shapiro.
I. B. Dworman, Arnold Kass and
Joseph Greenberg.
-Mrs. Louis Redstone, also of
Detroit, is a national vice-pres-
ident of the Congress Women's
Division.
Dr. Grayzel told the 700 dele-
gates that "the Jews of America
are now engaged in a momen-
tous struggle for self-preserva-
tion."
Stating that "the enemy is
not anti-Semitism, as some of
us like to believe," Dr. Grayzel
asserted that "the real enemy
is abandonment of our cultural,
religious . and historic tradi-
tions."
"The anti-Semite," Dr. Gray-
zel concluded, "serves us as a
scapegoat for our own sin of
weakening our heritage."
Mrs. Thelma Richman, of
Philadelphia, president of the
Women's Division, called for a
program aimed at "enriching
the Jewish contribution to the
extension of American free-
doms and enhancing Jewish
• ultural identifications."
Other speakers at the con-
vention, which is dedicated to
the theme, "The HER in HERi-
tege — Women's Responsibility
in Using the Past to Shape To-
morrow," were:
Prof. Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.,

8 ANCROFT

THE NEW

HOTEL • MOTEL • APTS.

OCEAN FRONT LUXURY
- Low-Low Rates
A ll Ai r
Conditioned
Rooms
daily
per pers. • New Pool-
Beach
dbl. occ.
• Free Self
50 of
Parking
• ••
160 rms.
Now to • Coffee Shop
• Entertainment
I
Dec. 19
.... ;
Write for Color Brochure
Ni

15th STREET •• MIAMI BEACH, FLA.

LUXURY! LOCATION!
LOW COST!

N OW YOU
GET- MORE

Daily,
* FREE TV in rooms
* FREE Beach Chairs
rptli .PPr i e.
* TWO Swimming Pools to Dee. 19
40
of
* FULL Social Program
130 Rats.
Shares Arranged
V.Jon.
4
Write for Brochure
to 23
JP and Information .

,

POOL
AGAMOREH""•
CABANA CLUB

OCEANFRONT AT
LINCOLN ROAD

Miami Beach, Florida

A

NEW

HIGH

Harvard University professor;
Samuel Brownell, former U.S.
Commissioner of Education;
Sen. Wayne Morse, of Oregon;
Simcha Pratt. Minister Pleni-
potentiary of Israel; Angie
Brooks, Assistant Secretary of
State of the Republic of Li-
beria; and Dr. Joachim Prinz,
national president of the AJ
Congress.
A luncheon meeting featur-
ing six outstanding personalities
in the world of the arts was
an unusual highlight of the
four-day convention.
Henry Morganthau, Boston
TV producer, moderated a panel
comprised of author Charles
Angoff; sculptor Leonard Bas-
kin; theatrical producer Kermit
Bloomgarden; literary critic
Irving Howe; novelist Fanny
Hurst; and choreographer Anna
Sokolow on "The Role of the
Artist."
The convention closed with
the adoption of a number of
resolutions covering agency
policy in the fields of civil
rights, civil liberties, separation
of church and state, Jewish
education and culture and sup-
port of Israel.
Superintendent Brownell, in
his address, stressed the "posi-
tive values in education," listing
four fundamentals of human be-
havior which should be taught
in all schools. These, he said,
were:
"1. Care in basing opinions on
all the factS; 2. reluctance . to
pass judgment without special
knowledge or competence; 3.
avoiding conclusions that ex-
press half-truths; and 4. respect-
ing the dignity of every._ human
being regardless of his economic
status, _ education, race, color,
creed or age."
Maurice Samuel, in another
convention address, urged ex-
pansion of the Jewish day
school program "to provide
leadership and backbone" for
the American Jewish commu-
nity.
Asserting that he believed no
more • than 10- to 15 percent of
Jewish children would ever at-
tend such Schools, he _said. that
the exact percentage would be
determined by the aptitude of
the children and the inclination
of the parents.
Samuel also said that Ameri-
can Jewry had been "untrue to
itself and America" -by relaxing
its tradition of Jewish intellec-
tuality and by attempts to es-
cape "from the particularity
that marks the Jewish people as
a unique phenomenon" on the
American and world scene.

" 'Advertise,' warned show-
man P. T. Barnum, 'or the
chances are that the sheriff will
do it for you.' To illustrate his
thesis, he pointed out that there
are 26 mountains in Colorado
higher than Pike's Peak—but
haw many people can recall the
name of any one of them?"—
From Bennett Cerf's new book,
"The Laugh's on Me."

IN QUALITY!

Strictly Confidential

By PHINEAS J. BIRON
"The Highest Tree"

Someone once said that the
box office success of playwrights
is as unpredictable as that of
golf champions . , • And there
may well be something in this
comparison for we have ob
served that the dramatic critics
which in the drama field are
the referees, frequently thumb
down the writers whom they
o n1 y yesterday proclaimed
geniuses. . . • And of course
when that happens the box of-
fice receipts go down, way be-
low par . . . Fortunately, it
does sometimes happen that
the public does not agree with
the critics for reasons which
are too complex to analyze in
this column . . . In any case,
the other evening we went to
Dore Schary's most recent
Broadway play, "The Highest
Tree." . . . The critics had
treated the play rather brutally
but the subject matter inter-
ested us and so we invited some
of our friends to join us in
this "judge by yourself" expe-
dition . . . And let us say right
at the outset that we were
rewarded.
Dore Schary's play is his best,
superior to his "Sunrise at
Campobello," and by far more
interesting than "A Majority
of One" which he co-produced
. . : The theme of "The High-
est Tree" should be of direct,
vital concern to every man,
woman or child in this age of
ours . . For while it deals
with many problems it touches
forcefully on the major prob-
lem of the cold war and that
is: The intellectual integrity of
the scientists who hold the
fate of mankind in their hands
. . . We shall not attempt to
synopsisizic Schary's plot except
for its basic theme . . . A great
physicist of our time finds out
that he has contracted leuke-
mia (probably as a result of
his work and the effect of fall-
out from nuclear tests) . . . He
knows that he is doomed to die
within six months . . . Leaving
aside the emotional ramifica-
tions of this situation, Aaron
Cornish, that's the name of
Schary's physicist, is struggling

"The hotel of the year — every year"!

NIGHTLY ENTERTAINMENT • FREE PARKING • FREE CHAISES

AND MATS • TV AND RADIO IN ALL ROOMS.

Daily, Per Pers., Dbl. Occ. Dec. 19 - Jon. 4, 40 of 145 Rooms
Dec. 1 to Dec. 19:
$4 per person dbl. occ.
Mod. Amer. Plan: full breakfast and
deluxe dinner, add $4 per person

For reservations, write direct or
see your Travel Agent

Wm. Fisher, Owner
ON THE OCEAN AT
64th STREET, MIAMI BEACFt

burlesques and serious plays—
if "Highest Tree" should close
before its time, the American
stage will have lost a significant
contribution . . . Dore Schary
whose career in the entertain-
ment field is studied with a
long line of successes achieved
his highest potential in his lat-
est play . . . It is rather ironic
that the review boys did not
take into consideration that
here was a playwright who was
reaching out beyond his pre-
vious scope and even if he fal-*
tered now and then, the sum
total of his work deserves high
commendation.

daily, per person,
double occupancy

20 of 150 Rooms

Dec. 1 to Dec. 16

3 Complete Meals Daily

RESERVE NOW!

DAVID ROSNIFICS

a
d ileatw

OBSERVED
Completely
Air Conditioned
and Heated
On the Ocean
67th Street,
Miami Beach
Write for Free
Color Brochure

HOTEL



ti

ilILLT Alt CONDITIOMO

$3 ON THE OCEAN AT 18th ST.
Lincoln Road Area
EDnatnecZi nr t
per
e
b A r i I pers.
Swim Parties
to Dec. 19
Wiener Roasts • Pool
20 of 117
Cabanas •Children's
rooms

.

r

erg
0,grifsse
w ith e verY facility for '

tggc4r Age

-.wow/
50
ItaullbYlePeOrccP
Dec. T9 to
. ers"
Jan.
per person
23, $2.50
dble.)
Private Pool -- beach

,
......
danc ing — entertai nment
u Cocktail Lounge
@ ,s —fabulos
* SPECIAL
SEASON RATES
k
WRITE
.ti.

C011tisellOrs
Gala
New Ye
ar' s Parking facilities.
Eve Party.
, Write For Brochure N .

FOR
BR OCHURE

LINCOLN ROAD
- NEAR COLLINS AVE.

COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED

German Youths
Atone for Spoiler

DUSSELD ORF, (JTA ) —L oc al
groups of German young people
in three towns have acted on
their own for the restoration of
desecrated Jewish cemeteries.
More than 100 boys and girls
renovated the cemetery in
Rheda which was vandalized
last August. When the youths
announced their intention "to
make good for the disgrace,"
the Rheda town council pro-
vided tools and financial help.
In Borghorst, another West-
phalian town, youth groups an
pounced they would care for
the local Jewish - . cemetery "as
a token for the guilt of the past
times." In Dinslaken, where the
cemetery also had been dese-
crated, a group of youths aged
15 to 17 spent their leisure
hours cleaning up paths in the
cemetery and replacing tomb-
stones.

Herzl Medallion to Author

SWIM POOL, SUN DECK, OCEAN BEACH • SOCIAL PROGRAM,

with the dilemma whether he
is to dedicate his last few
months on this earth to warning
his fellowmen about the threat-
ening danger of nuclear tests
or whether he should retire to
his corner and pass out silently
Propaganda? By no means
. . . - Schary presents the two
sides of the controversy about
the effect of fall-out rather ob-
jectively, perhaps too objec-
tively in our Opinion • . . A
very gifted craftsman, Schary
confines himself to the human
elements of the situation . . .
To the blase theater-goers,
Schary's - language is perhaps
too direct . . . His dialogue is
realistic and does not suffer
from pretentious sophistication
. . . His characters are moving
for they behave as common mor-
tals would under the same con-
ditions . . . Schary's skill as a
dramatist is indeed present in
every phase of the play . . . His
domestic scenes between the
older and younger generations
are masterly vignettes reflecting
the psychological currents of
our day . . . There is for in-
stance a characterization of a
young beatnik, a literary rock
and rollnick played by a new-
comer—his name is Robert
Ritterbusch—which is, in our
opinion, one of the highlights
of the contemporary American
stage,
We hope that "The Highest
Tree" will run for a long time
. . . Yet if it should fall victim
to the assault of the critics,
who use the same measure-
ments for musical comedies,

The second Theodor Herzl
Award, established by the Zion-
ist Organization of America, to
be presented to a person judged
to have rendered outstanding
service to the cause of Zionism
will be presented posthumously
to Arthur James Balfour.
The presentation will be made
to the Rt. Hon. Earl of Balfour,
nephew and heir of the author
of the Balfour Declaration, at
the Herzl Centennial dinner.
Monday evening at Hotel Wal-
dorf Astoria, New York, spon-
sored by nine metropolitan re-

awns o

• Spacious Cabana Club

• Private Beach—Pool



Now tin
Dec.

-- daily
*
per

person
double $

• Dancing — Movies
• Wiener Roasts

0' • 21" Television
in Every Room

Myron J. Mitnick
Gen. Mgr.

Dec. ig
to Jan.
4

occ.

*43 of 250

INCLUDES MEALS

(Breakfast and

Dinner)
Add $1 daily for Full Amer. Plan
EUROPEAN

PLAN

AVAILABLE

DETROIT: UN 4 6260

-

or see your travel agern

A FULL OCEANFRONT BLOCK • 30th TO 31st STS;, MIAMI BEACH

The

a . . AKOny

THEIZE IS1A.

DIFFERENCE

All the pleasure of a complete resort

...spacious pool, cabana and private

beach area...an extensive social pro-

gram...supervised children's activities
...complete air conditioning...televi-

sion in every room. And the artistry

of world-renowned Chef Charles Rosa

— superb, inspired cuisine. Unique
and • reathtaking...our rooftop IVORY

TOWER. All this unexcelled elegance

... European or modified American

plans...at remarkably modest rates.

For immediate information and reser-
vations, see your Travel Agent or

write direct
MOST EXCITING
BLOCK ON THE OCEAN • 32nd STREET • MIAMI BEACH_

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan