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October 30, 1959 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1959-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

D

Moroccan Leader Defends Florida Reports DSG Mission Members to Report
Country's Attitude on Jews New Bomb Threat at Meeting of Luncheon Clubs
Direct JTA Teletype Wire
as Member of Arab League
To The Jewish News

Direct JTA Teletype Wire
To The Jewish News

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y.—
A lengthy statement on the
situation of the Jews of
Morocco, on emigration of
Moroccan Jews to Israel and on
Morocco's unilateral abrogation
of mail service between that
country and Israel was made
here Tuesday by Abdallah Ibra-
him, Prime Minister and For-
eign Minister of Morocco.
Dr. Ibrahim was guest at a
luncheon of the United Nations
Correspondents Association and
was asked the comprehensive
question by the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency. He replied as
follows:
"First, one must understand
the background of the status
of the Jews in Morocco. I
really don't like to speak in
terms of Jews or Moslems in
Morocco, since we have really
only Moroccans. In the entire
history of Morocco there has
never been a Jewish problem,
not even in the Middle Ages. In
times of persecutions elsewhere,
Jews always received refuge in
Morocco as far back as the 13th
century. .
"In the 16th and 17th cen-
turies, Morocco's diplomatic
emissaries were Jews—a fact
that can probably be explained
because our relations were
mainly commercial, and Jews
were experts in commercial af-
fairs.
"These historical considera-
tions must be borne in mind,
and it must be remembered
that never were there any dis-
criminations against Jews in
Morocco. Even under the Vichy
government, Morocco categori-
cally refused to implement the
anti-Jewish laws of Vichy.
"After we achieved independ-
ence, we had to reorganiZe and
modernize our administration
and replace many civil servants
with Moroccans. How eve r,
access to administrative posi-
tions is open under equalitarian
competitions which do not men-
tion Jew or Moslem. Our ident-
ity card does not mention either
Jews or Moslems.
"Today there are few Mos-
lems in our tele-communica-
tions—the majority in that
service are Jews. When I was
Minister of Labor, my chief of
cabinet was a Jew. Now an
attache in my cabinet is a
woman who is a Jewess. The
economic counsellor until re-
cently was a Jew. That is why
I refuse to speak of Moslems

HOLLYWOOD, Fla. — Three
Jewish t e m p 1 e s here were
threatened with bombings over
the weekend, it was learned
Monday.
The threats were made by
anonymous telephone callers.
Police squads searched the
temples but f o u n d no ex-
plosives. The police maintained
surveillance over Jewish insti-
tutions.

or Jews—I speak only of
patriots. The law is the same
for everybody.
"When the law requires that
sale or distribution of printed
matter must be deposited in the
national archives, that law ap-
plies to everybody. The case
of the Jew in Meknes comes
under that law.
"As to emigration, our law is
like that in many other coun-
tries. Our law prohibits mass
emigration, they fall under that
law and we never ask them
whether they are Jews or
Moslems.
"As to postal relations, we
are members of the Arab
League and have ratified the
Arab League convention affect-
ing international relations. That
is why we must observe our
obligations as a state. It is in
some way a result of the
poisoned situation in the Middle
East. The good will of the en-
tire world would benefit by the
settlement of this problem.
"I regret that some organiza-
tions create propaganda and
create difficulties. Morocco will
never allow racialism which
would be a denial of its historic
tradition."

Two-Thirds of Jews
at Arizona U. Are
for Intermarriage

TUCSON, Ariz., (JTA) —
Jewish students attending the
University of • Arizona favor
intermarriage by a ratio of two
to one, according to a survey
made by a university student
for a minorities relations
course.
The survey was conducted by
Joel Botfeld, former president
of the Tucson Jewish Youth
Council. He charged that about
20 percent of the Jewish stu-
dent population at the univer-
sity were "college Marranos"
who attended church services
with their Gentile friends. He
conducted the survey by means
of a questionnaire among the
520 Jewish students on the Uni-
versity of A r i z on a campus.
Slightly less than half answered
the many queries.
The survey also showed that
59 of the students belong to
the Hillel Foundation; 80 per-
cent of the males have been
Bar Mitzvah, while 61 percent
of the females had been con-
firmed; 78 percent attended He-
brew or Yiddish school, the av-
erage length of such study hav-
ing been six and a half years
for males, two and a half years
for females; while seven per-
cent had no Jewish religious
education at all.
Thirteen percent of the Jew-
ish students do not attend High
Holy Day services, and 40 per-
cent attend classes on High
Holy Days. Male Jewish stu-
dents show the greatest amount
of mixed dating, while a high
percentage of the Jewish girls
date Jews.
The Jewish college student
today, according to Botfeld,
"does not know hat a Jew is.
To him, religion is basically a
philosophy, but he does not
know what the principles of his
Judaic faith are." Much of the
blame for the situation, in Bot-
feld's opinion, must be charged
against the parents, who are
seen by Jewish youngsters as
doing at home "the exact oppo-
site" of the Jewishness taught
at the Hebrew school or Sunday
school sessions.

*

-Morocco Bans All
Zionist Literature

PARIS, (JTA)—Jews in Mo-
rocco are now "cleaning" their
homes of any literature that
could be considered "Zionist" in
nature by the Moroccan authori-
ties. This follows the sentenc-
ing of a Jewish merchant in
Meknes recently to one year's
imprisonment, and a 125,000-
fine, for having his posses-
sion an Israel calendar. The
merchant was released on bail
pending the hearing of an ap-
peal he lodged with a higher
court.
Reports from Morocco state
that the government there is-
sued a decree banning the cir-
culation of two Jewish-French
magazines published in Paris.
One is "La Terre Retrouvee,"
organ of the Jewish National
Fund; the other is "Notre Dra-
peau," organ of the Zionist-
Revisionist Party.
Radio Tangier reported that
the Crown Prince of Morocco
attended Yom Kippur services
in Casablanca. The broadcast
described how the Day of Atone-
ment became "a particularly
happy celebtatiOn" for Moroc-
co's Jews, because- of the pres-
ence of the King's son.

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Hebrew Corner

Experts frOm Israel

Translation of Hebrew column
published by Brit Ivrit Olamit.
' A few weeks ago I saw an inter-
esting photograph in one of the
newspapers: the Prime Minister of
Ghana, Dr. Nkruma, is shaking
hands with two Israel naval offi-
cers. They are standing on the
deck of a ship which is flying
the Ghanese flag. One of the offi-
cers is the captain of the ship,
and the other is one of the Israel
teachers who teach in the naval
school of Ghana.
It is possible to find Israel ex-
perts today in many countries in
Africa and in Asia. They work in
various fields, and they are sent
mainly to countries who achieved
independence in recent years. An
Israel expert • was sent via the
U.N. to Nigeria, for example, to
organize the population census.
In Ethiopia there are a number
of Israelis, mainly engineers, who
are assisting the government of
Ethiopia in the development of
its country.
In Burma the Israelis are well
known today, and their good repu-
tation is widespread (goes before
them). An Israel expert reached
even a large country like India.
In the coming years the number
of Israel experts abroad will no
doubt increase, and in the future
as well they will bring benefit to
others and honor to the State of
Israel.

Members of the Detroit Service Grou.p's 1959 Mission to
Israel are shown here with young residents of the settlement
of Taanachim. Left to right, they are, GILBERT SILVERMAN,
NATHAN METZ (rear), MAX M. SHAYE, Mission chairman;
and MILFORD R. PREGERSON, co-chairman. Members of
the Mission will share the spotlight at the opening meeting
of the DSG luncheon club, to be held jointly with the Jewish
Community Center Jewish affairs luncheon club at 12 noon,
Wednesday, at the main Jewish Center, 18100 Meyers. DSG
president Jack 0. Lefton will chair the meeting. Representing
the Center will be its president, Samuel Frankel, who was a
member of the Mission. On the discussion panel will be Shaye,
Pregerson, Sam Jacobs, Alan E. Luckoff, Harold Podolsky,
Silverman, Meyer Steinberg, William Wetsman and I. Lewis
Zuieback. Irwin I. Cohn, chairman of the 1959 Allied Jewish
Campaign and a Mission member, will summarize the remarks.
Philip Slomovitz, editor of The Jewish News, will speak Nov. 11
on "The English-Jewish Press in America." On Nov. 18, Gerald
E. Dewhirst, vice president of the National Bank of Detroit,
will speak on "Israel: Impressions of My Trip." .0n Nov. 25,
Label A. Katz, president of Bnai Brith, will deliver the address
on the subject "Who Speaks for American Jewry?"

Israel Tells Hussein
to Stay Out of Iraq

LONDON, (JTA)—Anticipat-
ing the collapse of the present
pro-Communist regime in Iraq,
King Hussein of Jordan was
reported mapping plans to pro
claim himself as a ruler of a
merged Jordan-Iraqi kingdom
and to ignore warnings from
Israel which has no armistice
agreement with Iraq. A merger
of Jordan and Iraq could bring
Iraqi troops to the Israel
frontiers.
The report, published in the
press here, says that King Hus-
sein presided at a four-hour
meeting of 18 Iraqi leaders, in-
cluding two former Premiers,
Ali Jawdat Ayubi and Nuri

Eddine Mahmoud. The meeting,
called to prepare plans for an
expected collapse of General
Kassem's regime, made three
decisions.
One was to supply tribal
chiefs of southern Iraq with
arms so they could revolt
against Kassem "when the time
comes." The second was to dis-
regard Israel's warning that
Israel would occupy the Jordan
River west bank if Jordan
moved into Iraq. The third de-
cision was to move Jordan's
Arab Legion into Iraq if chaos
developed, regardless of what
the Iraq army might decide
to do.

United Hias Service Asks U.S. Lead
for Liberalized. Immigration Laws

PARIS, (JTA) — The United
Hias Service concluded its sixth
annual immigration conference
here with an "urgent plea" to
the United States Government
"to effectively take the lead on
behalf of the uprooted during
the World Refugee Year."
Reports by Hias field repre-
sentatives from five continents
indicated that more than 12,000
persons were currently register-
ed with the organization for im-
migration help.
James Rice, United Hias ex-
ecutive director, stressed the
plight of 1,100 Jewish victims
of persecutions who had regis-
tered with HIAS for immigra-
tion to the United States for
whom no visas were -available.
He said that during the past 18
months more than 1,500 such
refugees from Egypt had been
able to come into the United
States thanks to special legisla-
tion.
Rice said that "every effort
-must be made, when the United
States Congress reconvenes in
January, to persuade Congress
to adopt immigration liberaliza-
tion measures consonant with
American leaderShip in the free
world, and consonant with the

magnitude of refugee and immi-
gration hardships."
"This unfortunately was not
the case during the last session
of Congress," he added, "al-
though one law was passed
which did increase the pOssibil-
Ales for reunion of broken fam-
ilies, and some Oher measures
of positive value-were adopted."
United Hias leadership is urg-
ing, as a- miniptun program, the
adoption by -the United States
of the recoMmendations of the
U.S. Committee for Refugees.
These recommendations in-
clude: approval of • new legisla-
tion permitting the entry an-
nually of 20,000 refugees be-
yond present United States quo-
tas, and appropriation of $10,-
000,000 over and above present
United States expenditures for
refugee programs.

76 Catholic Clergymen
from U.S. Visit Israel

JERUSALEM, (JTA)
Sev-
enty-six Ca t h o l i c clergymen
from the United States, includ-
ing four bishops, have arrived
in Israel. They represent the
largest group of American
Catholics to visit Israel since its
establishment.

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