100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

October 16, 1959 - Image 31

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1959-10-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DOM

BY HENRY LEONARD

"He died in middle season. What a loss!"

Copr.

1959, Leonard Pritikin

Tribute to Noted Jewish Journalist

By JOSEF FRAENKEL
Dr. Z. F. Finot-Finkelstein,
who died in Jerusalem on Sept.
9, 1959, at the age of 73, was
a well-known journalist whose
articles frequently appeared in
Hebrew, English, Yiddish and
German newspapers and peri-
odicals. His death is a great
loss to the Jewish press.
A few weeks ago, his brother,
Dr. Josef Finkelstein, of "Ye-
dioth Hayom", Tel Aviv, died.
Both had at one time worked
together in the Polish-Jewish
dailies "Chwila" (Lemberg),
"Novy Dziennik" (Cracow) and
in the "Wiener Morgenzeitung"
(Vienna).
Dr. Z. F. Finot-Finkelstein,
who came from Lemberg, be-
longed to the circle of students
led by Adolf Stand, Leon Reich,
Osias Thom and David Hesche-
les. He played an important
part in Zionist activities in
Galicia and later in Austria.
When Sholom Aleichem came to
Lemberg and was looking for
somewhere to spend the night,
young Finkelstein, whom he
had met by chance, invited him
home. In one of his amusing
articles, Finkelstein told the
story of how Sholom Aleichem
with his wife, children, grand-
children, grandmother, mother-
in-law and son-in-law invaded
his small flat.
Dr. Z. F. Finot-Finkelstein
regarded himself as the "child
of a homeless people." He was
a wanderer, constantly in
search of a home. He visited
London before the First World
War, and his essay, "In the
Ghetto of London," appeared in
the "Jewish National Calen-
dar," Vienna, 1918.
In Vienna, he was a leading
Zionist who often addressed
Zionist meetings and lectured
at literary societies. He was a
good speaker in several lan-
guages, having command of a
rich vocabulary, and he de-
fended his convictions with pas-
sion and enthusiasm. He had
great descriptive talents and
knew how to captivate his au-
dience and his readers. His
book, "Stuermer des Ghettos,"
a collection of essays on Theo-
dor Herzl and his mother, on
Max Nordau and other person-
alities, appeared in 1924. Ten
years later he published his

book on Her z 1 ("Schicksals-
stunden eines Fuehrers"). Both
works are often quoted in Zion-
ist literature.
Dr. Z. F. Finot-Finkelstein
was for many years editor of
"Die Stimme," the official or-
gan of the Austrian Zionists.
He was a delegate at Zionist
Congresses and acted as the
Vienna representative of the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
In 1938, he moved to Jeru-
salem and continued his jour-
nalistic activities there. He
wrote a novel about Laurence
Oliphant and Naphtali Herz
Imber, as well as a major
essay on Karl Kraus, and it is
to be hoped that this will ap-
pear in book form. His loss will
be deeply felt by his friends
and admirers in many parts of
the world, and his articles will
certainly be missed. His name
will _long be remembered by
journalists and readers of Jew-
ish papers.

Wellesley, Mass. Votes
to Oust Biased Housing

.

193-Room Israel Hotel
Being Constructed

Plans for the construction of
Israel's largest hotel, a modern
building overlooking the Med-
iterranean Sea in Tel Aviv,
have been announced by Martin
N. Sandler, president of the
newly-formed Hotel Corpora-
tion of Israel.
Sandler, a Chicago business-
man, said that the corporation
was formed by a group of
American businessmen to build
the Hotel Tel Aviv in Israel'S
largest city.
The seven story, air-condi-
tioned hotel will have 193
rooms, all with private balco-
nies and baths. Dining room
accommodations include the
Maccabean Room holding 400
persons, and a ballroom for
600, the largest banquet hall in
Israel.
Hotel facilities will include
a health club and an open air
cafe around the outdoor swim-
ming pOol. Seven stores and
specialty shops will be located
in the shopping arcade. A bar
and cocktail _ lounge, as well
as a supper club, are planned.
The hotel will be situated on
the Mediterranean, five blocks
from downtown, next to the
126-acre Independence Park.

Monument
Unveilings

(Unveiling announcements may
be inserted by mailing or by call-
ing The Jewish News office, VE.
8-9364. Written announcements
must be accompanied by the name
and address of the person making
the insertion. There is a standard
charge of 62.00 for an unveiling
notice, measuring an inch in
depth.)
* *

The family of the late
Blanche Einhorn announces
the unveiling of a monument
in her memory at 3:30 p.m.,
Sunday. Oct. 25, at Beth El
Memorial Park. Rabbi Rosen-
baum will officiate. Relatives
and friends are asked to attend.

Jack Lesser Dies

Jack Lesser, one of the organ-
izers of the United Dairy Work-
ers Union in Detroit, died Oct.
9, at the. age of 64. He lived
at 3280 Fullerton.
Born in Russia, Mr. Lesser
came to Detroit 43 years ago
and went to work for the De-
troit Creamery Co. For many
years, he was the firm's only
Jewish employee.
He was active in the Lomzer
Society, and was a member of
its board. He also was affiliated
with the Chesed steel Emes
Society.
He is survived by his wife,
Anna; two sons, Dr. Morton and
Robert; a daughter, Mrs. Sam
Offen; and eight grandchildren.

Top town officials of Wel-
lesley, Mass. have announced
their unanimous decision to
seek the elmination of dis-
criminatory housing practices
in their area.
Following an informal con-
ference with representatives of
the Wellesley Fair Housing
Practices Committee, the Jew-
ish Community Council and
the Anti-Defamation League of
Bnai Brith, Wellesley's three
Hyman B. Gittleman Dies
selectmen issued a statement
Hyman B. Gittleman, of 731
of "hearty support" of the
principle of fair housing prac- Covington, well known - De-
troiter, an active leader in the
tices.
local Jewish community for
many years, died Monday at the
Chile President's Name
age of 75.
Inscribed in JNF Book
Funeral services were held
SANTIAGO, (JTA) — Jorge Tuesday at Kaufman Chapel.
Alessandri, President of Chile,
A native Detroiter, he was a
expressed gratification over the lifelong member of Congrega-
decision of the Chilean Zionist tion Shaarey Zedek and was
Federation to inscribe his name deeply devoted to the Zionist
in the Jewish National Fund cause. He studied electrical
engineering at the University
Golden Book in Jerusalem.
The President expressed his of Michigan.
Surviving him are his wife,
appreciation in a letter to Israel
Pollak, newly re-elected presi- Ella; daughters, Mrs. Jerome B.
dent of the Federation, in which Grossman and Mrs. Leonard M.
he also hailed the people of Rand of Tokyo; a sister, Hattie;
Israel for their spirit of labor brothers, Morton and Albert,
and four grandchildren.
and sacrifice.

OBITUARIES

SAMUEL BRENNER, 11362
Belleterre, died Oct. 11. Sur-
vived by three sons, Ben, of
Los Angeles, Harry and Nathan;
two daughters, Mrs. Frank
Weissman and Mrs. Alfred Bie-
man; and 12 grandchildren.

*
MARGARET BLITZ, 18615
Schaefer, died Oct. 14. Survived
by a daughter, Mrs. Samuel Ele-
fant; and two grandchildren.

ROSE FRIEDMAN, 11501 Pe-
toskey, died Oct. 14. Survived
by three sons, Fred, Jack. and
Sidney; a daughter, Mrs. Joseph
Wasserman, of Miami; two
brothers, a sister, nine grand-
children and 11 great grand-
children.
*
*
LOUIS GORMAN, 18238 Stoe-
pel, died Oct. 14. Survived by
his wife, Anna; a son, Sam; two
daughters, Mrs. Louis Schwartz
and Mrs. Charles Metchis, both
of Phoenix, Ariz.; a brother and
nine grandchildren.
• * *
GERTRUDE HOLINSTAT,
18980 Wildemere, died Oct. 14.
She leaves a son, Herman; six
daughters, Mrs. George Sey-
burn, Mrs. Mack Lane, Mrs.
Adele Kates, Mrs. Louis Mann,
Mrs. John Sillman and Mrs.
Marvin Barnett; a brother, 14
grandchildren and four great
grandchildren.
* • *
SAMUEL HELFMAN, 18034
Indiana, died Oct. 14, in Miami
Beach, Fla. He leaves his wife,
Bertha; four sons, Philip,
Jerome, Leroy and Charles;
four daughters, Mrs. Sydney
Pozen, Mrs. George Kollenberg,
Mrs. Abraham Lupovitch and
Mrs. Maurice Shacket; two
brothers and 24 grandchildren.
* :' *
HAZEL B. SOBEL, 15140
James, Oak Park, died Oct. 13.
She leaves her husband, Abel.
• * *
ROBERT GROSSMAN, 3031
Tuxedo, died Oct. 9. Survived
by his parents, Mr. and Mrs.
H e n r y Grossman; a sister,
Judith; and his grandmother,
Mrs. Fredericka Arak, Israel.
* *
ESTHER DAVIS, 13641 Dex-
ter, died Oct. 11. Survived by
her husband, Harry; a son,
Capt. Lawrence, with the U.S.
Army in Stutgart, Germany; a
daughter, Mrs. Sam Lazor; four
sisters and two grandchildren.
* * *
FANNY GUTTER, 17512
Northlawn, died Oct. 14. She
leaves her husband, Jack; a son,
Louis; a daughter, Mrs. Bernard
Grossman; a sister and three
grandchildren.

IDA KIEF, formerly of De-
troit, died Oct. 12, in Miami
Beach, Fla. Services and inter-
ment in Detroit. She leaves two
sons, Harry and Charles; a
daughter, Mrs. Max Englander;
and three grandchildren.

MONUMENTS

T

Manual Urbach 6 Son

7729 TWELFTH ST.
TY 6-7192

Ira Kaufman Chapel, Inc.

DIRECTORS OF FUNERALS

9419 Dexter



TY 4-s020

e*-7Z

1:0

NAT GREEN, 13421 Ken-
wood, Oak Park, died Oct. 14.
He leaves his wife, Ethel; two
sons, Leonard and Robert; a
daughter, Mrs. Robert Finkle-
man; a sister and four grand-
children.
* *
ERNEST VAN KLIVEN, 1
Lafayette Plaisance, died Oct.
11. He leaves his wife, Alice;
and a daughter, Mrs. Edward
Nicholson.

Osteopathy Student
Dies in Auto Crash

A 37-year-old Oak Park man,
George Robinson, died Oct. 12,

in Edina, Mo., following an
automobile accident.
Mr. Robinson was returning
to the Kirksville (Mo.) School
of Osteopathy, where he was a
student, following Yom Kippur
services, when his car was in-
volved in the accident.
Born in Detroit, Mr. Robinson
was a veteran of World War II.
He was in the furniture busi-
ness here for several years be-
fore returning to ' school last
month to study osteopathy.
He leaves his parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Philip Robinson; a
brother, Edward; and two sis-
ters, Mrs. Murray Schwartz and
Mrs. Marvin Sokol, of Long
Beach, Calif.
Services were at Ira Kauf-
man Chapel, with burial in
Clover Hill Park Cemetery.

Russian Woman Dies
in Holy Day Violence

An American traveler return-
ing from Russia reported in
New York on Wednesday that
two attempts at arson were
made on the second day of Rosh
Hashanah at the Moscow syna-
gogue and the cottage of the
caretaker of the Jewish ceme-
tery in Malakhovka near Mos-

cow.

The synagogue fire was ex-
tinguished and services were
held the same day, but the

caretaker's cottage was de-
stroyed and a Jewish woman of
70 was killed.

WE REMEMBER
1- cm 71 ?

During the coming
week Yeshiva Beth
Yehuda will observe
the Yahrzeit of the
following departed
friends, with the
traditional M e mo -
rico! Prayers, recita-
tion of Kaddish and
studying of Mish-
nayes.

Hebrew Civil
TISHREI OCT.

Morris Kowall
Samuel Rapp

15
15

17
17

Morris Goldberg
Max Zelickson

16
16

16
18

Lilly
Zablotsky-Stein
Sam Margolin

17
17

19
19

Samuel Kief
Sadie Ettinger

18
18

20
20

Sol Steih
Bella Raim
Harry Levin
Isadore -Berkowitz

19
19
19
19

21
21
21
21

Harry Wexler

20

22

Louis Harris
Aaron Kahn

21
21

23
23

Yeshiva Beth Yehuda
12305 Dexter
WE 1-0203

The name THE IRA KAUFMAN
CHAPEL is known for its ex-
cellent facilities and dignified
services at reasonable cost. •

O

6.1

1:0

rn

sy

0

.
'

K in •

c.

ca

cn

Ca



Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan