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September 18, 1959 - Image 29

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1959-09-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

By MILTON FRIEDMAN

(Copyright, 1959, Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Inc.)

WASHINGTON — A cross-section of the American daily
press shows a general sympathy toward Jewish problems. But
there are exceptions.
The Richmond (Va.) News-Leader is known by Virginia
Jewry as the newspaper that attacked the Anti-Defamation
League and blamed Jews in connection with the Negro inte-
gration issue. More recently, the News-Leader jumped to the
defense of the Arabian-American Oil Company (ARAMCO).
When Justice - Epstein of the New York Supreme Court
issued a ruling requiring ARAMCO to . cease anti-Jewish prac-
tices in New York, the News-Leader contended editorially that
ARAMCO was doing nothing wrong.
The News-Leader said "ARAMCO does not want people who
cannot serve in Saudi Arabia. What is wrong with that? There
is not `anti-Semitism' in this policy or 'hatred of the Jews,'
or anything else but a common sense acknowledgment of po-
litical realities in the Middle East."
The newspaper went so far as to suggest that New York's
FEPC law protecting minorities was a violation of the 1U. S.
Constitution through alleged infringement of the Fourteenth
Amendment.
In Fort Worth, Tex., the Star-Telegram found it difficult
to understand whose interests were served by the anti-
ARAMCO ruling of Justice Epstein. ''Certainly not that of
other New York residents, besides Jews, who might have found
employment with ARAMCO." Judge Epstein had ruled that
ARAMCO must cease religious bias in employment or get out
of New York State.

The Star-Telegram 'questioned whether the decision
really helped the Jews when it "may have contributed to
fresh irritations in the troubled Middle East."
Minneapolis editors studied the Morse Amendment which
expressed Senate disapproval of anti-Semitism against Ameri
cans by nations receiving U.S. aid funds. The Saudi Arabian
record of bias was available. But the MinneapoliS Star de-
cided to attack the Morse Amendment. The Star asked about
the propriety of using foreign aid legislation to "reform - the
world."
The Star said countries assisted by the United States
"establish their own laws and are as jealous as Americans
are of their own sovereignty." It was the Star's hope that the
United States could "persuade" Saudi Arabia and other of-
fending countries to drop their discriminatory practices. "But
we shouldn't try to bludgeon them into accepting our
principles."
Jewish attention was widely attracted to a report in
Parade, a Sunday supplement distributed nationally. Parade's
managing editor, David Wayne, went to West Germany to ob-
serve_ the- German. mentality on the twentieth anniversary of
the start of World War II.

Parade found that Germans today view Hitler's decima-
tion of the Jews as only a "tactical error" in that "it gave
him a bad press."
"As for Hitler," said Parade, "only a few spoke of the
late Fuehrer with real bitterness . . . although West 'Germans
pay lip service to the official view of Hitler as a monster and
one of the great catastrophies of German history, they pri-
vately review him, for the most part, in a kindlier light."
"Hitler wasn't such a bad guy," many a wistful German
told Parade. Germans cited his solution of the unemployment
problem, stabilization of prices, construction of super-highways ;
and other achievements. Some die-hards looked back with real
nostalgia. A farmer said: "As well off as we are now, we were
better off under Hitler."
Parade found an increasing tendency among Germans to
admit they were Nazis. They felt that the "heat" was off. Those
who were young at the time now say "it was good for young
people." Today, the self-admitted ex-Nazis smile or shrug their
shoulders and ask for understanding with, "What would you
have done?"
Asked to give their idea of Hitler's "biggest mistake," most
Germans singled out strategic errors that led to military de-
feat. Fewer thought it was his racial doctrines, concentration
camps and gas ovens.
Virtually all Germans conceded the extreme treatment of
the Jews was wrong. But they nevertheless protested, at this
late date, "we didn't know what was going on." Few Germans
saw moral wrongs in the Hitler record. It was mainly a matter
of disappointment in his tactical blunders in losing the war
that Germany launched 20 years ago this month. "That Hitler
started the war was . his biggest mistake only because he lost
it," the "new" Germany thought.

Danny Ras kin's From 'Prison Windows' to Drapes:
NCJW Furnishes Hospital Lounge

LISTENING

National Council of Jewish Akers and her committee dis-
Women, Detroit Section, has covered that no. social or rec-
completed the furnishing of a reation facilities were available
social and recreational lounge to the patients.
Within a short time the pris-
room for men in the psychiatric
department of Receiving Hos- on bars on the windows have
pital, according to Mrs. Stanley been replaced with new wheat-
Akers, chairman of the project colored draperies.
The furnishing of this room
development committee of the
Council. Other members of this is just the start of a project
committee are Mesdames Har- Council hopes to inaugurate at
old Weiss, James Van Vliet, Receiving.
Josh Horwitz and ISadore Win-
kelman. -
Cancel Pension Given
In an interview with Dr. - to Former Nazi Aide
IT'S NOSTALGIA time for a
grand couple, Rose and Harry James Graves, clinical director
KIEL, Germany, (JTA)—The
Dermer, celebrating their 50th of the psychiatric division, Mrs. government of the state of
wedding anniversary. . . . They
Schleswig-Holstein has cancell-
came to Detroit from New Slate Bnai Brith Rally
ed the pension it has been pay-.
York in 1915, and he opened
ing to Dr. Franz Schlegelberger,
the Pure Food Restaurant on for Blood Bank
All members, relatives and former Deputy Minister of Jus-
Wilkins and Hastings, which
tice in the Hitler regime, the
fed Detroiters for ten years. friends of Bnai Brith, aged 59 Finance Minister,. Dr. Schaefer
. . . Harry then went into the or under, are asked to attend announced.
shoe business after that for the Bnai Brith Council blood
Schlegelberger had been re-
another ten years, but couldn't bank rally from 6 p.m. to 11 ceiving a pension of more than
p.m.
Monday
at
the
Dewey
resist feeding people, and back
2,010 marks (a bout $500)
he returned to being a restau- School. located on Marlow Ave. monthly.
rateur. . . . Theh came the south of Nine Mile Rd.. Oak
hotel business and Greenbush Park; and during the same
MUSIC! ENTERTAINMENT!
Inn . . . which he and son hours on Tuesday at Adas Sha-
Mortie sold a few years ago. lom Synagogue, Curtis at Santa
Sammy Woolf
. . . . On their first date, back Rosa.
And His Orchestra
in old New York, Harry took ' The rally is expected to help
UN 4-3174
Rose to a dance, but most of boost the reserves of the blood
UN 3-8982
UN 3-6501
the time they walked or buggy bank which is operating now
at
a
deficit.
rode to the Atlantic Gardens
Theater and the silent movies.
. . . Rose says that when a
cousin introduced them, she
didn't think she liked Harry at
first . . . "but he grew On me
with his gorgeous black wavy
hair." . . . Last week, their
three children, Mortie, Ruth
(Mrs. Al Gursky) and Peggy
SUPER SPECIAL
(Mrs. Harry Miller) and 10
Best Kosher Sliced
grandchildren, gave them a
party for family and close
kg.
friends. . . . Both belong to
Brith Sholem Lodge of Detroit,
Lb.
which recently presented Rose
and Harry with a bond in honor
Pkg.
of their 50th anniversary, at a
1-Lb.
special party at the Jericho
Pkg.
Temple.
* * *
lb.
MEN'S CLOTHING is needed
at the Ann Arbor Veterans'
lb.
Hospital. . . . Contact Herman
Liberman's Own
Gach of the Jewish War Vet-
erans, at 19459 Woodingham,
UN. 2-1878.
* * *
WHILE TRAVELING via
American Airlines to the coast,
Joe Geller watched a gent in
cowboy gear definitely refuse
to fasten his safety belt. . . .
"Miss," he informed the stew-
ardess firmly, "for nigh on 20
years I've rode everything I
ever mounted, and I don't aim
to be saddle-tied at this stage
of the game. Let 'er buck! I'll
ride 'er!"
* * *
15301 E. Jelierson at Beaconsfield
WONDERFUL TWO-MONTH
VA 2 4118
vacation throughout - Europe
Luncheons 11 to 3 — Dinners 5:00
to 10:30. Suppers 10:30 - to 2 a.m.
made Claire Ettlinger, Judy
Holinstat, Phyllis Altman ancf
3020 GRAND RIVER. Free Parking. TE 3-0700. Pri-
Nancy Falk world travelers in
vate Banquet Rooms for wedding parties. Serving
their very early 20s . . . fill-
the World's Finest Steaks, Chops and Sea Fhods for
more than 26 years. Al Beef aged in our cellars.
packed with stories about the
CHOP HOUSE
nine countries they visited.

Delicatessen Is Our Business
Not Just a Side Line
Buy horn Us ■

BREAKFAST BEEF

Shorf Salami
Hot Dogs
Knockwurst
Smoked Chubs
Corned Beef Lunch Roll

• LIVER SAUSAGE

• FRANKFURTERS
• CORNED BEEF

• PASTRAMI

• BOLOGNA
• SALAMI

AT LEADING DELICATESSENS, SUPERMARKETS & RESTAURANTS

KOSHER ZION

SAUSAGE COMPANY OF CHICAGO

159 South Water Market, Chicago 8, Illinois
J. M. LEFKOFSKY

U. S
INSPECTED
AND PASSED BY
DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE
EST.

Distributed By

4089 EIMHURST AVE.

WEbster 3-8816

Detroit, Mich.

89`
69`
79`
69`
89c
jar 39 c

Kosher Dill Pickles

1BERM

MILE RD OAK PARK

WHERE TO DINE

AL GREEN'S

-

CARL'S

100,000 Moroccans
Seek Israel Immigration

• PEPPERED BEEF

49`

P

ROBIN HOOD'S serving the finest and most delicious of foods, Steaks,
Chops, Chicken Club Sandwiches. Short Orders. Delicious Hamburgers.
"Served as you like it."
Open 24 Hours
20176 LIVERNOIS AVE., 1%2 blks. S. 8 Mile Rd.

JERUSALEM, (JTA) — De-
spite powerful barriers against
emigration at least half of
MARIA'S PIZZERIA BANQUET FACILITIES
Morocco's 200,000 Jews want to
Specializing in Pizza Pie and Famous Italian Foods
come to Israel to join families
Parking Facilities . • . Carry-Out Service
here, it was learned reliably.
Since the establishment of Is- 7101 PURITAN—Open 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.—UN 1-3929
rael, about 120,000 Moroccan
Jews have come here.
TR 2-8800
CLAM SHOP and BAR
Official Moroccan declarations
Serving.
Oysters,
Clams,
LOBSTERS,
Steaks
and
Assorted
Sea Foods
concerning free immigration 'ac-
2675 E GRAND BLVD.
tually do not apply to Jews. Music by Muzak
Since Jewish applicants for trav-
Prime Beef at its Very Best: Pies baked on prem.
el visas are suspect, many bona
ises. Special Luncheons and Dinners. Menus changed
L daily. Open 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
fide businessmen are refused
such facilities because of gov- BEEF BUFFET
19371 W. 8 Mile, 1 Blk. E. of Evergreen
ernment fears they will go to
Israel once they leave Morocco.
DUBBS BEEF BUFFET
Reports have reached here of
• PRIME BEEF • SHRIMP • LOBSTER
eases in which Jews have not
• CHICKEN
• DELMONICO STEAK
been allowed to return to Mo-
13300 W 7 MILE cor. LITTLEFIELD
OPEN DAILY 11 • 8:30 P.M.; SAT. & SUN. to 9 P.M.
rocco if they visited Israel dur-
ing an overseas trip.

H lartir -s

— THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS -- Friday, Sept. 18, 1959

`Bad' Press on Jewish Issues

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