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September 04, 1959 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1959-09-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

News Brevities

Eric H. Rose, managing direc-
tor of the Trans - Lux Krim
Theater, is enthusiastic about
the current

', showing of
"The Scape-
goat" co-star-
ring Academy
Award win-
ners Alec
Guinness a n d
Bette Davis
playing prom-
inent roles
with Guinness
and Miss
Davis are
Nicole Maurey,
Irene Worth
Nicole Maurey a n d Geoffrey
Keen. A du Maurier- Guinness
Production for MGM release,
"The Scapegoat" was produced
by Michael Balcon and directed
by Robert Hamer, who has
directed Alec Guinness in four
of his films.
* x *

ANN L. KORSON, R. E., is
now located at the Leib Clinic,
on W. Seven Mile Rd., where
she is engaged in the practice
of electrolysis for the perma-
nent removal of superfluous
hair.
A graduate electrologist, she
recently completed a post grad-
uate course at the Hoffman
Electrolysis Institute in New
York. Miss Korson specializes
in the medically approved short
wave dauk-a-matic system which
enables the removal of super-
fluous hair more rapidly than
previously possible.

Aug. 31 marked the 150th
Anniversary of Detroit's first
newspaper printed on the Rich-
ard Press. The DETROIT HIS-
TORICAL MUSEUM marks this
occasion with a special exhibi-
tion of the Richard Press and
THE CHILD'S SP ELL IN G
BOOK, considered to . be the
earliest product of the Richard
Press. THE MICHIGAN ESSAY,
Detroit's first newspaper was
printed on the Press purchased
by Gabriel -Richard on a trip
to eastern cities in 1808.

*

*

DR. JOSEPH WEINER, of
19450 Pinehurst, a 1953 Uni-
versity of Toronto graduate,
has - been named a teaching
fellow in pathology at Harvard
Medical School.
* *

NORMAN . J. SOKOLOW has
been named administrative di-
rector of Elliott Hall, 13015 W.
Chicago, by Dr. Paul L. Frai-
berg, medical director. Soko-
low was assistant director at
the Jewish Home for the Aged.
Elliott Hall is a medical treat-
ment center and nursing home.
It was opened a month ago
with 89 beds and modern fa-
cilities.
• * *

WILLIAM M. PACKER, one
of the founders and president
of The Hundred Club of De-
' troit that was organized to give
financial help to the widows
and dependents of policemen
and firemen killed in line of
duty, will serve as chairman of
the annual, Brotherhood Din-
ner, Nov. 12, in the Masonic
Temple.

OPENING DAY

PARADE

FRIDAY
SEPT. 4

11 AM
DOWNTOWN

"SLINGS A N D ARROWS,"
currently appearing at the
Critic's Club, 10441 W. 8 Mile,
will be held over until Sept.
12. Showtime is now weekdays,
8:30 and 11:30 p.m., Fridays
and Saturdays, three show s,
8:30 and 10:30 p.m. and 12:30
a.m.
* *

Samuel Goldwyn's $7,000,000
filmization of the DuBose Hey-
ward-George Gershwin classic,
"PORGY and BESS," which
was two years in the making,.
will have its Detroit premiere
Oct. 7.

MERVYN WINE1VIAN, 25, of
20010 Schaefer, was honored
for action during the Aug. 23
Expressway floods by the Po-
lice Department. He was driv-
ing a truck on the Ford Ex-
pressway at the time of the
flood and loaded more than a
dozen persons into his truck
from stranded cars.

Detroit Banker Joins
Israel Study Mission

Gerald F. Dewhirst, vice
president of the National Bank
of Detroit, left Sept. 1 for Israel
to participate in the 1959 Jew-
ish Agency Bankers Study Mis-
sion.
Max Fisher, president of the
Jewish Welfare Federation, ex-
plained that the Bankers Mis-
sion, organized by Gottlieb Ham-
mer, executive director of the
Jewish Agency, New York, is
part of a continuous program
which started in 1949.
In addition to Dewhirst, this
year's Mission includes many
prominent bankers from all
over the country.
The group, which is visiting
Israel at the invitation of the
Jewish Agency, will study the
country's economic and indus-
trial development as well as its
immigration and colonization
program. During their stay,
members of the Mission will be
given the opportunity to ob-
serve the operations of the Jew-
ish Agency in the fields of
rehabilitation, h o u s i n g and
agricultural development and to
study the problems facing the
Agency.
The National Bank of De-
troit, with which Dewhirst has
been associated since 1933, has
cooperated with the Jewish
Welfare Federation in a num-
ber of refunding loan projects
which have been utilized by
the United Jewish Appeal—the
Federation's major beneficiary
—for the resettlement of Jewish
refugees in Israel. During his
current visit, Dewhirst will
have the opportunity to acquaint
himself with every phase of
this resettlement program.

Sid Shmarak's

Business Briefs

Effective September 10th, the
ELKIN TRAVEL BUREAU of-
fers 8 passenger Cadillac limou-
sine service between their of-
fice, located at 19437 Livernois,
and the Metropolitan and Wil-
low Run Airports, and return,
every 30 minutes, upon demand,
around the clock. For informa-
tion call Elkin Limousine Serv-
ice, UN. 4-4464.
*

MAX FRIEDMAN, who has
been 'barbering' for the past
38 years on Oakland, 12th, and
on Dexter, is now located in a
new, modern, air - conditioned
shop at 15125 W. 7 Mile Rd.,
and specializes in men's, wo-

f _

Miami Beach Rabbis
Split on Naming of
Kashruth Director

Israeli Airport Worker Arrested
as Spy for Iron Curtain Country

MIAMI BEACH, Fla., (JTA)
—The Miami Beach City Coun-
cil has reappointed a layman
for a two-year term as City In-
spector of Kashruth after Jew-
ish religious leaders had dif-
fered sharply as to whether or
not only a qualified rabbi could
fill the job. The inspector's
task is to police meat markets
to see that there is no violation
of the city's ordinances on rep-
resenation of products as kosh-
er.
A strong fight against reap-
pointment of Frank Brickman
to the job was led by spokes-
man for the Community Vaad
Hakashruth of Greater Miami
who insisted that the appoint-
ment had to go to a rabbi. The
organization charged that "the
City of Miami Beach can not
disregard the Orthodox com-
munity by covering the kosher
merchants with a city ordinance
that infringes upon Orthodox
religious laW."
Rabbinical supporters of the
inspector said that the question
of kashruth fell into two cate-
gories, religious, dealing with
the meat itself, and surveil-
lance, which was primarily po-
licing against misrepresenta-
tion. A rabbi was not needed
for the policing job, they said.
The council held that the
city inspector was not supposed
to pass on a religious matter
like kashruth but only to make
certain there was no misrepre-
sentation involved.

TEL AVIV, (JTA) — A 27-
year-old aircraft technician is
under arrest on charges of spy-
ing for a foreign country, po-
lice authorities here reported.
Under security regulations,
neither the man's name nor the
foreign country for which he is
alleged to have done the es-
pionage were named.
The country concerned, it is
understood, is behind the Iron
Curtain. The man was employed
at Lydda Airport, and is charg-
ed with having passed on to a
foreign power important in-
formation about Israeli aircraft
and air fields.
While little information was
revealed by police, some details
of the case were learned. The
man's parents reportedly live
in a foreign country. When the
technician went to that coun-
try's legation here and express-
ed a keen desire to be reunited
with his parents, he was al-
legedly asked to deliver certain
secret information.
It is asserted that the man
was given a visa to go to the
country to see his parents and

upon his return here, was or-
dered to continue his espionage
activities. Later, it is under-
stood, his services were con-
sidered so important that an
Ambassador from the country
concerned came here to see
him and to brief him on exactly
the type of information re-
quired.
Meanwhile, however, the
man's parents are still in the
foreign country, and the man
was promised that his parents
would be permitted to come
here if he continued to furnish
information desired. The sus-
pect's trial is scheduled for
mid-September.
Recently, another Israeli was
arrested on espionage charges,
under circumstances similar to
those surrounding the latest
suspect. In the other case, too,
the suspect has apparently been
trapped into spying because of
his interest in bringing here
members of his family living
in an Iron Curtain country. The
first suspect had also been
promised that his family would
be permitted to come to Israel,
and this promise was not kept.

AHAVAS ACHIM SUNDAY RELIGIOUS SCHOOL

Registrations for the 1959-60 term will be taken at

AHAVAS ACHIM SYNAGOGUE

19190 SCHAEFER

SEPTEMBER 8, 9, 10th FROM 7:30-9:00 P.M.

American Paintings
Exhibited in Tel Aviv

Classes from Nursery (4 years) to 10th Grades

TEL AVIV, (JTA) — An
exhibit of paintings and sculp-
t u r e s by 18 contemporary
American artists opened here
in the Helena Rubinstein
Pavilion . of the Tel Aviv
Museum. -
United S t a t e s Ambassador
Ogden R. Reid and prominent
Israeli artists attended the
opening of the exhibit, which
is entitled "Eighteen Living
American A r t i s t s." All the
works are by abstractionists
and surrealists. The works were
assembled by Karl Katz, direc:
for of the Bezalel Museum of
Jerusalem. Some of the paint-
ings and sculptures are on loan
for this exhibit from the Whit-
ney Museum of New York.
The exhibit is part of a cul-
tural exchange b e t w e en the
United States and Israel. The
Helena Rubinstein Pavilion
was opened last January with
$125,000 contribution by Ma-
dame Rubinstein through the
American-Israel Cultural Foun-
dation which finances various
cultural institutions in Israel.

SCHOOL STARTS SUNDAY, SEPT. 13th,
AT THE VERNOR SCHOOL

El Al Cuts Back Schedule
LONDON, (JTA)—El Al, Is-
raeli.National Airlines, will cut
back -its winter tour schedules
to Israel, the line's commercial
manager announced here. He
said capacity of El Al's jet
planes was so great it more
than covered demand for air
service here.

Limited to 25 students each

TRACEY AND PEMBROKE

1 st Session 9-11 A.M. — 2nd. Session 1 1 A.M. to 1 P.M.



For Information, Cali UN

THE OFFICERS OF THE NEW
MISHKAN ISRAEL SYNAGOGUE

14000 W. 9 Mile. Road, Oak Park

LI 8-2666

REQUEST THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THIS NEIGHBOR-
HOOD TO ARRANGE FOR THEIR SEATING FOR THESE
COMING HIGH HOLIDAYS AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.

THE SYNAGOGUE IS AIR CONDITIONED AND HAS ALL

FACILITIES.

SPIRITUAL LEADER—RABBI ISAAC STOLLMAN will
officiate and the Renowned CANTOR, REVEREND SHIMON
GREENFIELD will lead the HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES.

The TICKETS COMMITTEE are at the SYNAGOGUE from
5:00 P.M. through 9:00 P.M. daily, except Friday and Saturday;
from 12:00 Noon on Sunday.

YOU WILL HAVE A SPIRITUAL UPLIFTING !
RESERVE YOUR SEATS AS SOON AS YOU CAN AS THE
NUMBER OF SEATS ARE LIMITED.
WE WISH YOU ALL A HAPPY, HEALTHY AND
PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR !

B'NAI DAVID RELIGIOUS SCHOOL

meeting at Francis Scott Key School, O.P.

NOW ACCEPTING REGISTRATIONS

at the Synagogue Office: 24350 Southfield Rd.

— EL 6-8210 —

All Classes Begin on Sunday, Sept. 13th

* Sunday School Program for Youngsters — 5 yrs. and up

* Full Hebrew School Curriculum for Boys and Girls

8 yrs. and up, thru 10th grade

* Transportation Available.

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