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May 29, 1959 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1959-05-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Suburban Community

Memorial Day Reflections
on a Boy's Visit to Arlington

By the Oak-Woodser
Nearly everyone who has
made the trip to our nation's
capitol has included in his itin-
erary a stop-over at the Arling-
ton National Cemetery.
Here, buried side by side, are
the great and humble—Presi-
dents of our United States, dip-
lomats like John Foster Dulles
who was interred there only
this week and the unidentified
heroes of our •country's wars.
On Memorial Day, somehow,
our thoughts always drift back
to the awesome sight of Arling-
ton's Tomb of the Unknown
Soldier, guarded around the
.clock by a special honor guard
comprised of military personnel
from all branches of the service.
Our first recollection is that
of a little boy who was im-
pressed by - the erectness of
the solitary figure of the
guard with his shiny rifle, his
spit-polished shoes and his
medallions brightly gleaming
in the sun.
And we recall the boy's envy
of another young fellow who
summoned up enough courage
to approach the soldier and
walk next to him as he marched
the designated number of paces,

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did an about-face and returned
down the same path he marched
before.
There . was an inner satisfac-
tion, though, when the soldier
neither stopped marching, nor
answered the boy's questions,
nor even changed the line of
his sight to give his young
friend a glance.
The blue, cloudless sky, the
long stretches of green grass
and the beautifully kept rows of
flowers also stick vividly in
one's thoughts.
What else do the memories
of a boyhood visit to Arlington
bring to mind?
The unforgettable image of
the changing of the guard—of
commands barked out amid the
silent spectacle of hundreds of
watching eyes, of goose flesh
raised as the guards saluted
each other and the stone monu-
ment.
And out of the corner of his
eye, a little boy looked and
saw, for the very first time,
that his father was weeping
—a stream of tears that ran
down his cheeks but were
quickly captured by a waiting
handkerchief.
It was a mother's intuition,
we suppose, that started a soft
squeeze of the little boy's hand
and stilled the open mouth that
was about to ask an embarrass-
ing question.
Many years passed before the
little boy fully realized what
those tears were all about. And
to this day he still is not cer-
tain that they can be explained
without resorting to the sort of
sentimentality that cheapens
true emotion.
But, like his father, the little
boy vividly recalls this first
visit to Arlington, especially on
Memorial Day, when the
thoughts of a grateful nation
turn somberly in tribute to the
soldiers—both known and un-
known, both dead and alive—
who served our country so duti-
fully with courage and sacrifice.

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Hebrew Ac ad emy
Sets PTA Days

The Hebrew Academy of Oak
Park, 13855 W. 9 Mile, an-
nounces -the inauguration of a
series of Parent Teacher Con-
ference Days beginning Mon-
day and continuing through the
week.
A get-acquainted party for
parents of Academy children
will be held at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Arnold Cohen, 14411
Vernon, Oak Park at 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Other interested
persons are invited. For infor-
mation or reservations, call Mrs.
Joseph Tulcensky, LI 6-2504 or
Mrs. Max Silverman, LI 3-9617.
The overall conference pro-
gram will provide each parent
with an opportunity to meet
privately next week with his
child's teacher and to discuss
individual progress reports for
the semester. Separate confer-
ences have been scheduled for
both Hebrew and English de-
partments of the school.
Registrations for the fall se-
mester are currently being ac-
cepted by Mrs. Seymour Ribiat,
LI 7-2773. The school now pro-
vides comprehensive Hebrew-
English instruction for nursery
classes through the 2A. A third
grade will be incorporated into
the Academy's curriculum for
the first time in September.
Plans call for the addition of a
new grade each year through
High School. Bus transportation
to and from school is provided.

Five Teens to Assist
Play at 10 Mile Center

Five teen volunteer aids
(TVA's) have just completed
their training course and are
prepared to assist the Jewish
Community Center's 10 Mile
branch professional staff on the
playground at 15110 W. 10 Mile,
Oak Park.
The five, Roslyne Corey, Pen-
ny Fishman, Celia Rutter, Bar-
bara Silver and Rita Schnider,
will volunteer at least one af-
ternoon a week at the branch,
making possible individualized
service and better supervision
on the new seven-acre play-
ground.
A new group will start train-
ing after school closes in June,
to serve during the summer.
TVA's must have completed the
10th grade and must have a de-
sire to work with children. For
information and registration,
contact Mrs. Gloria Pankin at
the branch, LI 7-6161.

Beth Shalom to Hold
First Commencement

The first religious school
graduation to be held by Cong.
Beth Shalom will take place at
10 a.m., June 7, in the syna-
gogue, 14601 W. Lincoln.
The four members of the
graduating class will be joined
in the program by members of
a volunteer choir, which will be
featured in the presentation of
"The Seven Buttons," a can-
tata.
Rabbi Mordecai S. Halpern
will speak and deliver the
charge to the graduates, and
Leonard Servetter, educational
Oak-Woods Men's Club director, and Max Dobrowitsky,
Elects Samuel L. Glanz school board chairman, will
Samuel L. Glanz has been participate.
The community is invited to
elected president of the Men's
Club of Young Israel Center of attend.
Oak-Woods, heading the fol-
lowing slate of officers for the Install Samuel Ravitz
1959-60 term:
Men's Club President
Louis Kanarek and Louis
In ceremonies conducted
Fein, vice-presidents; Art Klee
Thursday evening at Cong. Bnai
and Lawrence White, secre-
David, Samuel Ravitz, newly-
taries; and Samuel Ginsburg,
elected president of the Bnai
treasurer. Board members are
David Men's Club was installed
Irving Pitzak, Dr. G. Flogg-
man, Seymour Ribiat, Wilbert into office.
Rabbi Hayim Donin, spiritual
Simkovitz, Morris Siporin, Al
leader of the synagogue, also
Lieberman, Harry Kaye and
inducted Milton Herman, Neil
Joseph Gittleman.
Kalef and Harry Warsh, vice-
David Spinner, outgoing
presidents; Albert Seigel, trea-
president who also will serve
surer; Joe Gutfreund and
on the board, announces that
Charles Berghoff, secretaries;
the third annual Men's Club Edward Kreske, sgt.-at-arms;
picnic will be held June 28, in and Irwin Ratner, chaplain.
Oak Park's Major Park, under
Charles Shere was in charge
the chairmanship of Louis
of the installation program.
Fein.

Livonia Cong. .Women
to Install New Officers

The Livonia Jewish Congrega-
tion's newly-organized Sister-
hood will install its first slate of
officers at a dinner at 7:30
p.m., June 8, at Clarenceville
Jr. High School, on Middlebelt
Rd. in Livonia.
The following officers will be
installed in candlelighting cere-
monies: Mesdames William Mic-
kelson, president; Jerry Fried-
man, Nat Cogan and Robert El-
kin, vice-presidents; Morris
Friedman, Sol Carr, Larry Feil-
er and Norman.Fellander, sec-
retaries; and Sam Rubens,
treasurer.

Ask Police to Guard
Desecrated Shrine
to Martyrs in Paris

O-W Young Israel
Elects D. Berris

David I.• Berris, Detroit at-
torney and a founder of the
Young Israel movement in this •
area, has been elected presi-
dent of the Young Israel Cen-
ter of Oak-
Woods.
Berris, a for-
mer president
of Young Is-
rael of Detroit
and past presi-
dent of Cong.
Mogen Abra-
ham, is cur-
rently honor-
ary chairman
of the Metro-
politan De-
troit. Council
of Young Is-
rael.
Active in
many aspects
of community
Berris
life, Berris is
a leader in the Jewish Welfare
Federation, Yeshivath Beth Ye-
hudah, Yeshiva University,
State of Israel Bonds and
United Religious Zionist Or-
ganization.
Elected to office with Berris
were Isaac Knoppow and David
Greenbaum, vice-presidents;
Seymour Ribiat, treasurer;
Henry Dworkin and Wilbert
Simkowitz, secretaries.

PARIS (JTA) — Paris police
officials were asked to provide
special police protection for
the memorial of the unknown
Jewish martyr after vandals de-
faced the walls of the memo-
rial with huge smears of India
ink.
The defacement was the lat-
est in a series of anti-Semitic
incidents believed to be the
work of young hooligans be-
longing to extremist right-wing
groups in Paris. French police
had started a thorough investi-
gation of the memorial de-
facement before M. Papon, the
Prefect of Police, received
from Sen. Andre Mutter, presi-
dent of the Memorial Commit-
tee, the appeal for special pro-
tection.
In earlier incidents, stones
were thrown through windows
of synagogues and Jewish
stores have been marked with
swastikas.
A group of 300 persons gath-
ered at the memorial at the
invitation of the Movement
Againist Racism and Anti-Sem-
itism and for Peace. They laid
wreaths on the memorial and
called for stronger legislation
to deal with anti-Semitism.
The National Association of De-
portee and Persecutee Organi-
zations also sent representa-
tives to the gathering.
Both the Representative
Council of Jews of France and
the International League
Against Anti-Semitism have
been asked by their members
to counteract the latest anti-
Semitic incidents. Jewish So-
cialist Bund members here
have approached the French
Socialist party on the problem.

Emanu-El High School
Graduation Set Today

The annual high school grad-
uation service of Temple Em-
anu-El will be marked at 8:15
p.m., today, in the main sanctu-
ary,•14450 W. 10 Mile, Oak Park.
The eight young men and wo-
men graduates Will participate
in the service and present a
cantata. An oneg shabbat will
follow.
The graduates are Susan
Frankel, Joseph Grand, Howard
Kutchai, Allen Lewis, Helaine
Robinson, Beth Rosenberg, Ana-
ruth Rosenwach and Stephen
Winer.

Named to serve on the board
of directors are Mrs. David
Dombey, Jerome Kelman, Erry
Lowenthal, Harry Mirvis, Max
Nusbaum and Leon Wolok.

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