100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

July 03, 1925 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish Chronicle, 1925-07-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

scu.

PLENETRist

?AGE FOUR

• -gs,„

•■11

Asa

.
1t1 .491-

ie../ • V.

tools and baggage but they transported bodily their
cultural and religious baggage intact. But to trans-
plant a people whose only bond is persecution is an-
IMMO NOINalli
magma AIMS
other matter. The Jews of Europe are loosely organ-
Jewish Chr•ekto Publielsiag C•.. lo.
rehllsited Weekly by TI.
ized, heterogeneous, for the most part unaccustomed
Joseph J. Cummins, President and Editor
to hard labor and untrained in the industrial arts and
Jacob H. Sehakne, General Manager
agriculture. It was proposed to settle these peop
re.tass
at
!m.o.
matter rtes 8, 11111. at the
Uganda as an agricultural people. The project strikes
soOO o seemed-,lase
Ilkh., baler the Aet tellb112 .. iL
us as even more blundering than the Mexican offer for
General Offices and Publication Building
in Mexico there is a more highly organized urban civi-
525 Woodward Avenue
lization which would enable the urbanized Jew to tic-
:Cable Address: Chronic'e
T•hiphos• Cadillac 1040 Led. orate
commodate himself to his new surroundings.
Stratford
Place,
Load..,
W.
I,
Easland
14
____ -_ _-
It is with no little gratification that we greet the
Subscription, in Advance.......____. ................... _ ....... $3.00 Per Year
definite ending of the Ito. When a distracting influence
ti.
,.. ■
oi ....p.a... .01 ......tt....t
is removed it enables people to address themselves to
r. too. n seouo. °face
by Tuesday ming of .. week
the actual problems which confront them.
on euate
of Interest
bt
the
The
Detroit Jelshh jhromlele Invitee correspond..
be the .1.1. people, but dleelaltne reeponelhOlty for . indorse... of
The Jew should have learned by this time that there
.1..rs expressed by the •Iiters,
are no short cuts and no easy solutions to difficult social
Tamuz 11, 5685 and economic problems and then too, the land of milk
July 3, 1925
and honey at the rainbow end is sheer myth. One can
hardly be blamed for trying all sorts of expedients or

ill'ELM1' BWISII ii-RopacLE

r■

Baiting the Alien---an Old Habit

New York Letter

By KIMBALL YOUNG

By WILLIAM Z. SPIEGELMAN

The sum of $500,000 for the pur-
pose of establishing a school of aero-
nautics at New York University was
announced as the gift of Daniel Gug-
genheim. In a letter accompanying
the half million dollar gift the teem-
her of the Guggenheim family, one of
whom recently set aside a fund of
three million dollars for a scholarship
foundation, visions the development of
air traffic in America similar to the
development of the railroad.
At the same time the British press
gives eloquent expression to praise of
Sir Philip Sassoon, Undersecretary of
Air in the British Cabinet, for his fos-
tering the scheme to form air squad-
rons at the universities of Oxford and
Cambridge for the education of the
undergraduates in aeronautics. A
strange coincidence, yet not so strange
at that.
The Guggenheim family has per-
formed one of the greatest services for
the upbuilding of this country's indus-
g out the copper tr
tries by bringing
e fw thpeoeetaictuht. ilpw did the ancient
ores
ttet,rore

Along with religious intolerance,
econotnic violence, and the misuse of
the indigenous Indian, the agitation
against the foreign-born resident is
almost as old as the United States it-
self. Following the days of the Alien
and Sedition Acts, when there was a

storm burst in such fury that before
the day was over several persons had
been killed or wounded rid property
of considerable value destmyed by fire.
In the rioting that followed more peo-
pie were killed and several Catholic

churches and schools Awe burned.
Both sides became more and more en-
good deal of popular indignation con-
raged, although impartial historians
cerning alleged intrigue by European
are inclined to compliment the Catho-
agents in this country, there came a
lie clergy for their self-control and ef-
period of conflict with Great Britain
forts at mediation.
which took up our excess energies for
Out of such conflict leg , ads are sure
a time. After 1812, and especially at
to arise, as they have arisen in all his-
the close of the Napoleonic Period in
tory, large and small. S.% in this lo-
Europe, there was considerable mi.
cal struggle, a martyr was found. One
gration to the United States. There
was, at the same time, a large move- is tempted to say "had to be found,"
no unversal is hero-worship. He turn-
ment of our own population to the
ed up conveniently in George Schiffler,
Ohio Valley, and the immigration from
a youngster of 18 years, the tradition-
Europe began to fill up the gaps left
by those who moved over the Alle- al son of a poor widow, who, so the
story runs, was shot down by an Irish
ghanies.
Amer.
Amer-
With the death of Robert M. La Follette there even experiments when one suffers and no relief is in
About 1817.18 certain fervent news- mob as he was "defending the
ican flag." The scene of his death was
sight. In such a predicament it is easy to forget that
ting on the in-
papers began
commen
mmigration. The tariff of painted on the banner of the Native
the cure is often worse than the disease.
the American scene one of the outstand-
c reasing i
I •. d f
16 had enhanced the need of cheap American associations. A hose com-
We do appreciate that it is easy for us to be dm-
pany which was organized shortly af-
ing figures of the first quarter of the twentieth century.
labor in our cities.
various
immi-
eties The
which
assisted
the terwards proudly took his name. And
Like the great figures of the nineteenth century, Web- passionate because we are comfortable, but just the
grant aid societies
a popular blind rhymster of the day,
Clay, Calhoun, he never attained to the Presi- same we realize that emotional outbursts, stupid blond-
newco mers to settle here were unfav-
"Suly there is a vein for the sil-
J. Sproul, wrote a poem about him
ixorable
make t
regarded. By 1817 the total J.
orably
es will not Jewry.
, arid iat. place for the gold where
t7 ,ry
unsoun d
annual immigration had reached over which was sung by the natives to the
-
that he left as deep an im
rnil•
nine
nine
r
was
foreign
tune of Auld Lang Syne.
theoriEuropean
dency, but it is fair to say
ering,
facts which co nfront
e
30,000. One-half of this numb
lten
k out of the earth, and
n is ta
did any President during his
lion between the Rhine and the Urals have pressing,
Irish. The older population began to
pression upon his age as
out of the stone.
"rois
brass
Americans attention give
view the situation with alarm. Thus
"One putteth forth his hand upon
often desperate problems which demand instant solo•
Il sing a solemn lay,
lifetime.
the American Daily Advertiser re-
the rock; he overturneth the moan-
In memory of a much loved one,
tion, while the continuous, persuasive problems are le-
Ile was anathematized by those who saw a new
marked:
loins by the roots.
Slain on the sixth of May.
glom These people are trapped in that area, practical-
Re nutittelt,ins oeyu et s r,i tzrs among the
"Let us not forget, before it is too
danger to the established order, if the threat was only
teeth every m
p-
ly every road of escape being closed. There is no long-
late, what motives brings these people
I die! I die! he nobly said,
a mild criticism. He was admired by all who apprecia-
ious thing.
to our shores. Let us remember that
But in a glorious cause;
er an America, while the limitation of Palestine need
"But where shall wisdom be found?
it is cheap lands, high wages, food in
In exercise of Freedom's right,
ate honesty, courage, devotion and determination. He
not be explained again. These fanciful mass immi-
and where is the place of understand-
My Country and its laws. . . .
plenty, and freedom from military
ing?"
service; not a love of our institutions,
was always in the vanguard of any movement which
gration schemes are slowly but surely dying. We do
Two thousand years of development
or a belief that our form of govern- l'rotect your country and her laws
not wish to minimize the seriousness of the situation of
he thought would improve the life and increase the
has taught a lesson; vision supported
ment is better that they have. Let
Come to the rescue, come;
European Jewry, but we do insist that a proper appre-
by labor paves the road for further
us remember that they come with all
And put all foreign influence down,
happiness of the common man. If by that curious con-
and higher development.
the prejudices which are the result of
Arise, protect your home.
ciation of the fact that all of Europe is suffering will
The New York University in com-
tradiction which is often discoverable in those with
race and early training, and that in
give us a clearer perspective and a sounder understand-
menting upon the gift stated: "there
Our flag's insulted, friends are slain,
welcoming what seems to be the op-
strong feeling he espoused reactionary economic or
is no denying that the United States
pressed of other lands, we may really
And must we quiet be;
ing of our own problems.
has lagged far behind Europe in the
No! No! We'll rally around the flag,
he taking an adder into our bosom."
political theories, it was because he proceeded on the
At this time all efforts must be concentrated in Eu-
development of commercial aviation.
Already in 1817 the notion had aril-
Which leads to victory.
assumption that anything which the corporate inter-
rope. Land settlement must be speeded, the Ort
The air map of Europe is literally
en that it was love of governmental
eriss-crossed
with
airplane
lines.
Nev-
Between the opening of the Mexican
forms, love of liberty in the abstract,
schools must be assisted, the Oze and World Relief
ests favored should be opposed.
ertheless, the situation of the United
War and the rise of the Know Noth-
which Welted the mass of early col-
Organization must be enabled to carry on relief work
Ile was the hero of that middle class and those
States is more hopeful than a hasty
ing Party the political activity of the
onists to come to America. Men op-
examination would indicate. Whereas
among the destitute and sick. The problem of Euro-
parently can not admit, in retrospect,
nativists was inconsequential, but the
farmers whose economic ideas are those of the compe-
the attitude toward commercial avia-
that they are motivated by "cheap
spirit of the movement was kept alive
pean Jewry is a European problem and must be solved
tion
in
this
country
even
six
months
by such non-political groups as The
lands,
high
wages,
food
in
plenty,
and
tition period antedating the era of trustification.
there, if it is to be solved at all. After much wandering
ago was inclined to be pessimistic,
freedom from military service," in
Order of United American Mechanics,
He attained to his greatest prominence when
there
is
now
noted
a
change
of
heart
The American Protestant Association,
their
migrations.
Rather
they
prefer
we are back where we started ten years ago.
Follette facts did not
toward decided optimism."
to prattle about "love of institutions"
and the Order of United Americans.
America entered the war. To La
Evading unpalatable facts does not help us. We
These were anti-Catholic and anti-
and other abstract virtues.
change because a war had been declared. With a fine
are persuaded that none of the proposed solutions have
During
the
first
flare
against
the
foreigner, yet their concern was
George Blumenthal, New York
historic mind it was impossible to persuade him that
immigrants, Congress passed a resolu-
rather economic and religious than
any semblance to a genuine solution for the acute as
hanker, donated $50,000 for the Uni-
tion
instructing
the
national
executive
the Great War differed essentially from the wars of
political.
versity of I'aris for the development
well as the chronic illnesses of European Jewry.
to furnish that body, periodically,
The Know Nothings come into Po -
of French culture.
the past. The hokum and cant failed to take him in.
with
the
names
of
governmental
em-
litical notice about 1s52 with a plat-
• • •
form advocating free schools, the Bi-
ployees, with ages, birthplaces, and
He knew that greed, love of power, hatred were the
It is not characteristic of the pro-
lengths of service. The object of this
ble in the schools, and native Amen-
motives which actuated the war makers. Ile was ex-
gressive Jewish mind that after bring-
conjoin. The organization was strict-
order, of course, was to discover if
ing out the treasures of the earth its
coriated for these things because the people of the
foreign-born citizens were usurping ly secret. When any member was
vision is turned to the heavens and
It must be a source of genuine satisfaction to all evo-
country were gripped by fear and hatred. Woe to the
Federal offices. A storm of protest
questioned as to his possible member-
simultaneously two members of the
went up. Certain postmasters actual- ship, he declared he knew nothing
lutionists, modernists and the generality of forward
man or woman who does not hate sufficiently when
Jewish race on both sides of the At-
ly had the audacity to refuse to sub-
about the society. Thus the name
looking people to learn that Clarence Darrow, Bain-
lantic "looketh to the ends of the earth
hatred is the order of the day. However, he lived to
mit the data, and one government
"Know Nothing" arose. An individ-
and teeth under the whole heaven."
bridge Colby, Dudley Field Malone, Walter Nelles and
enjoy the day when President Wilson at St. Louis re-
printer
in
Ohio
openly
defied
the
or-
ual to be eligible to initiation must he
• • •
a native-born American and "not in
ders by refusing to print the blanks
Samuel Rosensohn are to represent John T. Scopes in
peated the very sentiments which he had voiced when
Vision is also manifested in the
upon which the information was to be any way either personally or by fam-
his forthcoming trial at Dayton for violating the anti-
it was both dangerous and unpopular to do so. He
achievement of Dr. Judah L. Magnes
given. Subsequently the government
ily ties connected with the Roman
who sailed back to Jerusalem last
evolution teaching law of the State of Tennessee.
enjoyed the further triumph of election to the Senate
rescinded the requirement and this
Catholic Church." The order consist-
week following a stay of several weeks
early attempt to sift and classify peo-
ed of three degrees of glory. The first
hst-
by the largest majority ever given him, notwitand
The idea of prosecution by the state is a practice of
in the United States.
of these included the great mass of ad-
pie failed.
Dr. Magnes, dean of the recently-
ing the fact that his anti•militarist war record was
such long standing that we accept it as the normal con-
During the early thirties local na-
herents and to them the actual name
opened Hebrew University on Mount
tivist societies began to form. In 1835
of the organization was not made
dition, while the notion of a public defender has re-
used against him.
*T;
Scopus, without the usual bombastic
a group calling themselves The Demo- known. The second degree was made
Upon an examination of the life and activity of La
calved but scant consideration even in the most ad-
accompaniments of campaigns, se-
erotic Association of Native Ameri•
- of those members who were consid-
cured an endowment fund of over one
vanced communities. This latter attitude may be ex-
cans pledged their support to Horn- ered fit for office in the society. These
Follette one discovered a close adherence to the prin-
million dollars and an annual income
presidential maneuvers of up
persons knew the real name of their
in
the
son
plained on the theory that there is too much coddling
ciples of freedom contained in the Bill of Rights to
of $150,000 for the maintenance and
organization which was "The Supreme
that year. So, too, in 1836, in the lo-
of criminals; too many technical defenses and loopholes
expansion of the Hebrew University.
the Constitution. He labored earnestly to guarantee
cal mayorality elections in New York Order of the Star Spangled Banner."
arburg, who started the
W
Felix
NI.
The third degree consisted only of
and New Orleans, political organiza-
and that any further regard for the man charged with
these rights, with the idea in mind of extending the
fund by a contribution of $500,000,
Lions under the name of Native Am- those who were thought capable of
crime will encourage crime and criminals. Then, too,
sphere of personal freedom consistent with those fun-
will head a permanent American corn-
holding political office in local, state,
erican societies had candidates in the
which underlies the theory of
m ittee for the support of the univer -
h following year national
ne national government.
Ass,
notig.
.
flu,
bi
eance complex
In the
veng
...... vengeance

- -
-------
- ---
"";''
-
J
city. It is the same vision of the Jew
The Know Nothing movement, like
field began to arise. 111 Jul y, 1837,
punishment
has
acted
as
a
deterrent
to
enlarging
the
La Follette took free speech, press and assemblage
ish race applied to an institution for
some seven hundred citizens of Wash-
similar organizations since, reveals
scope of activity of the public defender.
the Jewish race.
literally, not only for himself, but for the most insignifi-
ington, D. C. initiated The Native the tremendous appeal which secret
• • •
American Association of the United orders with their ritual, regalia, and
cant minority group even though that group consisted
The phenomenon of these able, conscientious, so -
A sign of broader vision was the
States. Its platform advocated the
fantastic wordiness have upon us all.
of but a single individual. The last test of the man
cially conscious lawyers offering their services gratis "Common Council" held in New York
repeal of the naturalization law, the
McMaster reports that the members
-
came when the Klan issue was at its height at the time
City between representatives of Re-
i
exclusion of foreign-born citizens
from
"recognized one another by signs,
i s a new departure which promises much toward die
form, Conservative and . Orthodox
political offices, the prevention of any
for resident
Presi
on
grips, pass-words, signal of distress,
couraging meddlesome busy bodies and encouraging
when he was nominated as ca
European influence in Federal affairs,
f(r, royo e:r, tar t s ri rasnt d , t
test questions, and rallying cries."
all those who are seeking to improve the quality of hu _
. htilise-
im
peerhi an psthin
the Progressive ticket. Ile came out with an unambigu-
and the fostering of native American Any mention of the name of the so-
general history of the Jewish people.
sentiment
throughout
the
country.
°us statement attacking the Klan as an organization
ciety or of its activities was forbidden.
manity
'
The Union of American Ilehrew
Taking the lead from the Washington When meetings were called or candi-
which violated every practice and tradition of freedom
If John T. Scopes had to employ his own counsel
Congregations and the Central Con -
group other associations were founded
dates were to be supported, the whole
contained in the democratic creed. He saw in this or-
ference of American Rabbis, repre-
and pay them from his limited resources he would be
elsewhere.
business was managed by the use of
senting the Reform wing of American
As a result of this renewed agitation
ganization of dark people a menace to religious free -
curiously shaped or colored papers die-
very badly handicapped. The issue in this case is far
Jewry, the linited Synagogue and the
the first actual violence occured be-
tributed to members or scattered in
It represented to him a return to medievalism
dom.
Rabbinical Assembly, representing the
tsveen the two groups. In Boston, in
and obscuratism. Ile did not question the political larger than any individual. Scopes is merely the sym-
the streets or posted in conspicuous
Conservative, the Union of Orthodox
June, 1837, a serious street fight took
hol of freedom and enlightenment and opposed to him
places. Naturally this aroused the
Congregations of America deliberated
place between a party of native Am-
wisdom of his attack. It struck hint that this order
curiosity and fear of the general mai-
are the forces of reaction and obscuranism. It is heart-
together on how to bring about a
erican firemen and a crowd of Dub-
lotion and doubly enhanced the power
stood for everything which was Odious and hurtful,
spiritual unity in American Jewish
liners on their way to a funeral. Only
ening to find lawyers representing all shades of relig-
of the Know Nothings, just as the
and in his straightforward manner he denounced it in
life in many countries, a problem al-
the militia was able to quell the Ms-
ious belief championing the right of the teacher to
masked, clandestine functions of the
most as difficult as squaring the cir-
turbance. In the bank riots of Cin-
language which left no room for doubt as to where he
present Klan often incite terror in the
teach the subjects touching man's origin and develop-
cle.
cinnati, a year or so later, which grew
hearts of innocent people.
ment consistent with the latest scientific discoveries.
stood.
Statistics show- a deplorable state
out of the monetary, debacle of the
A letter from Lincoln to his friend
with regard to Jewish congregational
"shin-plaster banks,' the nativists
Naturally he was friendly to Jews, for they were
This action should have a sobering effect upon the Klan
Speed, in 1855, furnishes an incisive
membership. There are 750 congre-
blamed the German population for the
comment
on the whole movement. Lin-
a people who suffered from prejudice and discrimina-
minded Know-Nothings who have run amuck, passing
gations belonging to the Reform, Con-
mob-spirit, although there was little
coin wrote:
tion. In his philosophy men were equal politically.
servative and Orthodox wings, with
all sorts of prohibitory and reactionary legislation since
or no foundation in fact for this ac-
„I am not a Know Nothing, that is
total membership of 750,000 individ-
cusation.
Any act which denied that equality was noire to meet
the end of the war. It is about time a halt was called
certain.... How can any one who ab-
uals. In addition there are 1,000
During 1830 and 1039 petitions to
hors the oppression of Negroes be in
by the socially conscious, clear headed and broad vis-
with his opposition.
smaller congregations unaffiliated
Congress continued to come from dif-
favor of degrading classes of white
with national bodies. The combined
ioned men and women of this country. We were rapid-
ferent sections of the country. The
The country has suffered a great loss by his death,
people? Our progress in degeneracy
membership of the 1,750 congrega-
citizens
of
Sutton
and
Millbury,
Mass-
appears to me pretty rapid. As n na-
ly
becoming
the
laughing
stock
of
Europe.
We
were
for no matter how many courageous, honest, intelli-
tions, he added, include approximate-
achussetts, for instance, asked Con-
tion we began by declaring that "all
earning the deserved reputation as the protagonists of
gent men a country may possess, the loss is sure to be
ly one and a half million pepole.
gress to inform them, among other
men are created equal." We now prac-
• This would indicate that not even
every stupid and bizarre idea which the dark people
things:
tically read it "all men are created
felt.
one-half of members of the Jewish
"Whether there are not designs
equal, except Negroes." When the
of America could conceive. These benighted folk were
community in this country are identi-
against the liberties of our country by
Know Nothings get control, it will
fied with Jewish Congregational life
aided and abetted by designing ones who made capital
means of this great influx of foreign
read "all men are created equal, ex-
or with Jewish organizations. Co-op-
emigration? Whether the character
out of the hatred and malice engendered by war. The
cept Negroes and foreigners and Cath-
eration between Jewish and non-Jew-
of many of the emigrants does not
olics." When it comes to this, I shall
fishers
in
troubled
water
carried
an
insidious,
uninter-
ish religious bodies is progressing. Its
Israel Zangwill called a conference in London to
augur a vast increase of pauperism
prefer emigrating to some country
ultimate success however, is mainly
rupted campaign in the hope of poisoning the minds
and of crime in our land? Whether
where they make no pretence of loving
discuss the future of the Ito. the territorialist organiza-
dependent MI the possibilities of co-
there is not a foreign conspiracy ex-
of
the
people
already
filled
with
rancor
and
suspicion.
liberty—to Russia, for instance, where
founded by him in 1906. After a careful consid-
operation within the Jewish commun-
tion
isting against the government of this
despotism
can be taken pure, and
Once prepared by this propaganda they became the
ity.
eration of all aspects of the problem the delegates de-
great republic and measures adopted
without the base alloy of hypocrisy."
In
view
of
the
situation
the
Council
pliable tools who carried out plans which have dis-
and plans now in operation for its exe-
In the end, the Know Nothings and
cided to liquidate. As a matter of fact this conference
decided to recommend the calling of a
cution?"
graced us and made us ridiculous in the eyes of the
their imitators were lost in the great
conference composed of national, con-
Here one discovers the universal
was but a gesture inasmuch as the Ito has not func-
civil strife which engrossed the coon-
gregational and rabbinical organiza-
whole
intelligent
world.
battle cries: designs, conspiracies, for-
tioned since the beginning of the great war. If it had
try after 1860. It remained for an-
tions in America for the purpose of
eign powers. Our attention is today
We
were
beginning
to
feel
strangled
by
the
ava-
other century to raise the same old
acting unitedly to further the relig-
any chance to be revived the Balfour Declaration plus
directed to more recent arrivals, but
banners over new cohorts with new
lanche
of
ante-deluvian
laws
and
were
wondering
how
ious
interests
of
the
constituent
na-
the actual settlement in Palestine destroyed every pos-
the formulae of attack remain the
names. The soul of Hundred Percent.
tional organizations which they share
Forte.
long it would continue.
a
o
ism g es marching on.—The N tion.
sibility. Were it not for the personality and influence
was
in
Philadelphia
that
the
most
It is to be reasonably expected that this nightmarish
not
time
of Zangwill the organization would never have attained
he rer
n. %a:rtih at
ni tce;TeTing
pious
or ad- violent conflict ensued In the City of
-
deluge will be clammed up for a time, with the further
ministrative autonomy of any con-
to any prominence. It had no social or economic valid-
Brotherly Love the streets literally
Many, no
stituent organizations.
The many men and women in
hope that soon we shall be able to write finis to a book doubt will resent this Common Coon- Tan with blood from m early in May,
ity to recommend it. The mass immigration sugges-
1811. until the late summer following.
America and many others here and
1844
which for stupidity, retrogression and discrimination cil. 1t. is, nevertheless, a healthy sign
tion to Mexico is an even sounder proposition and its
elsewhere who know or know of Re-
The origin of the trouble lay in dif-
of vision. feremes of opinion about the voting bekah Kohut, who has long been iden-
has never been equaled in the history of this country.
failure to evoke a response on the part of a Jewry seek-
privileges of the immigrants and es- tified. with important religious and
ing any sort of escape indicates clearly how unsound
Do not be in a hurry to succeed.
penally it concerned itself over the
civic causes, will welcome and delight
What would you have to live for
and impractical such movements are.
in her memoirs published by Thomas
question of the Bible in the public
afterwards? Better make the hori-
Seltzer of New York under the title
schools. The Protestants had forced
The movement of an agricultural people from one
zon your goal; it will always be ahead
of "My Portion." It is an engaging
Bible-reading into the regular educe-
country to another, even from one continent to another,
of you —Epigram •
record of a spiritual life lived tinier,
tional diet of the children of the town.
I ask him nought but to remember the day of our
has been accomplished without any serious dislocation
the spell of both admiration and defy.
The Catholics did not oppose this, but
It abounds in informing and interest-
did request that their children be giv-
A man's mouth may be shut and his
as instanced by the removal of the Tolstoyan Donka-
parting.
ing reactions and reviews of people,
mind closed much more effectively
a
Catholic
version
en permission to use
bourn from Russia to Canada. This was a homogenous,
I lift my greeting on the wings of the wind
places and events which make a toe-
by his knowing all about a subject
of the Scriptures.
closely-knit religious agricultural community which
To my friend• when the heat of the day beginneth
ful contribution to our knowledge of
than by his knowing nothing about
Meetings to discuss the question
the Subjects she treats with so much
a.—Epigram.
a
torus.
The
op-
brought
matters
to
ought
freedom
from
religious
prosecution
and
decided
s
to call.
I bespeak for
posing camps began to hector and to clarity and charm.
to emigrate en masse. They found large tracts of
When he made a covenant of love by an ap le tree.
disturb each other at their respective "My Portion" a widespread Telling.
Liberty means responsibility. That
arable bold in Canada very similar to the ground they
ALEVI
gatherings. On the sixth of May the —Dr. Alexander Lyons.
JEIIUDAH
i s w h y most men dread it.—Epigram.

La Follette.

• •

Champions of Evolution.

The Ito Ends.

it

"MY PORTION"

id

B Y AN APPLE TREE

tilled in asia. They brought with them not only farm

.2.05.. • N, ,o. • v .. „ok 11,

.240'

'II 16,- Stbe

•3‘,.. Yi st 16,

re.

re. Jo).

re.

rt. it.. ro,

se,

se •

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan