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September 08, 1922 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish Chronicle, 1922-09-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIE MA KOK

fl,N1SffelRONIC Lt

PAGE FIVE

011111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111& - PROTECTING RIGHTS

'

Opportunities Offered by Local Schools

11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111e



■ 11111911190Mo~

`1111111111111111••••• ••••1111111•111

"SERVE THE LORD WITH
SONG"

Founded in 1877

1141asitu of Detroit

630 East Jefferson Avenue

Just a Reminder

to

Students—Old and New

Cl

will be resumed ■ • follows:

LITERARY DEPARTMENT

Sept. 20

Sept. 11
Sept. 25

ENGINEERING

I Section A
Section B

LAW

( Freshman
Sept. 18
( Junior and Senior Sept. 25

COMMERCE AND ( Day School
FINANCE
( Night School

Sept. 18
Oct. 4

COMMERCIAL ART DIVISION

Sept. 5

HIGH SCHOOL CLASSES

Sept. 6

Enroll Now!

For particulars call—REGISTRAR—Cadillac 1750

The DETROIT INSTITUTE
of MUSICAL ART

"Strongest Faculty in the Middle West"

THE IMPORTANCE OF CHOOSING A
SCHOOL

Your success is entirely a matter of training, consequently
CHOOSE a school very carefully, as your future is largely de-
termined by this choice.

OUR SCHOOL

The policy of this school is based upon the most progressive
ideas, a policy of individual training plus a genuine personal in-
terest in every student's ultimate success.

OUR FACULTY AND COURSES

We offer a faculty of over 60 Artist Teachers, leaders in the
musical life of the city and including 10 of the leading members
of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, also decidedly superior advan-
tages in Piano, Voice, Violin, Organ, Theory, 'Cello, Harp, Orches-
tral Instruments (including our school orchestra), Mandolin, Banjo,
Ukulele, Languages, Dramatic Art and Public Speaking.

OUR LOCATION

We are situated in two large buildings in the Art Center of De-
troit, opposite the new Public Library, at the corner of Kirby Avenue.

Fall Term Opens September 11th

Registrations Taken for Day or Evening Instruction.

For our new illustrated catalog, address
HENRY B. MANVILLE, Business Manager
'Phone Northway 2955
5415 Woodward Avenue

I eluding folk songs, poems of modern
Jewish poets set to music, songs of
Labor, childrens music in Hebrew,
What the Alliance of Hebrew Choral
Yiddish and Euglish, but there is no
Societies Has Done for Judaism.
doubht that all this will be realized
before long. The Alliance is planning
By ELBERT AIDLINE-TROMER
to establish a Regional or Territorial
Organization, to standardize and con-
"My heart is firm, Oh God; I will trot the song repertoire of the Jewish
sing and give praise, even with my Folks' Schools; to issue periodically
spirit. Awake, psaltery and harp; I literature on music as well as text-
will wake up the e
l ery and
I books for the national and religious
will give Thee thanks among the peo- schools; and to publish an Alliance
pie, 0 Lord; and I will sing praise un- magazine in Yiddish, containing news
to Thee among the nations"—thus did regarding the activities of the Choral
David, the Poet-King of Israel sing to societies all over the country and Can-
the God of his people centuries ago.
81171, as well as musical items of Jew-
And ever since then Israel has serv- ish and general interest, not to men-
ed the Lord with song. There is mel- tion critical and theoretical discourses
ody in the Jews three daily prayers; on music. Nor is this all. The Al-
in the chants that welcome and in Hance will send out lecturers to awak-
those that bid good-bye to the Sab- en the interest of the Jewish people in
bath; there is a divine, sad strain in Jewish music, and, last but not least,
the cantor's supplications, for there is a Jewish Academic Music Center will
song in the heart of the people—un- be organized to hold discussions, give
premeditated, and simple, a melody concerts and recitals and in every way
that emanates from their beings as possible try to rouse the Jewish peo-
freely and unconsciously as the dawn ple once more to the glory and splen-
that tints the morning sky with scar- dor of Song.
let and gold, as the moon that silvers
In order to carry out this program,
the grass and the leaves and the rip- the United Ilebrew Choral Society,
pling streams, until the whole world with headquarters at 960 Prospect
becomes transformed into a vision of avenue, New York, decided to secure
amber and trembling, bluish-green a fund of $10,000 for the work (lur-
light.
ing the coming year. The "drive" will
In the turmoil and din of the New begin early in October, and money will
World, in the struggle for existence he raised by means of subscriptions of
and adoption to new conditions, the $5. and more each, entitling the hold-
song had almos gone out of our peo- er to admittance to every concert giv-
ples' heart. The heartfelt, simple en by the local Choral society of the
melodies of the old home would only Alliance, as well as to receiving all the
now and then be heard at the theater; literature issued by the Organization.
the sacred songs of worship had be-
There is no question but that the
come confined to the synagogue and amount required will be,oversubscrib-
the temple. But this could not last ed, because what Jewish heart will not
indefinitely. The Jew's better soul— thrill to the great possibility of a mod-
the Neshomoh Yeseiroh—awoke from ern musical development of the an-
slumber and about a year ago the first cient synagogue themes, which will
alliance of Hebrew Choral Socities serve as a nucleus of a Jewish spirit-
was formed. The response was im- ual renaissance? And if a movement
mediate, and an Alliance; consisitnig is to be judged by the persons who
of twelve affiliated societies, with an sponsor it, the fact that Cantor Jos-
ever increasing membership, came in- ef Rosenblatt, who was elected treas-
to being. A year later, last June, the urer of the Alliance at its last con-
second annual convention was held, vention, has been heart and soul with
0 and it became evident that without the organization, supporting it every
much ado, without fireworks, the or- way possible—this fact serves as the
ganization had come to stay. To best guarantee both as to its impor-
those who were skeptical about Jew- tance and success. Special mention
ish music, it will prove, has proven al- must also be made of Solomon Golub,
ready that Israel's soul still craves the well known poet and composer,
music, and the divine melody is not has been secretary of the Alliance,
yet dead in his heart.
since its very inception, and who is de-
At the June convention, practically voting all his ability and energay for
the entire program was made up of its advancement. The other officials
vocal and instrumental compositions of the Alliance are as follows: Leo
by modern Jewish composers and, Low, the able conductor and compos-
what is most remarkable and unusual, er, first vice-president; and Philip
the majority of these composers were Fischelowitz, lover and sponsor of
present at the concert. They were; music, second vice-president.
Jacob Helmet, Matte° Benzman, A. W.
Binder, Piston Brounoff, Jacob David
son, Soloman Golub, Wladimir Ilei- VIOLIN TEACHER HAS
fetz, Leo Low, J. Shatter, Max Spick
RECORD OF 20 YEARS
or, Lazar Weiner and P. Yassinof
sky..
Pasquale Briglia, violin teacher,
The Hebrew Choral Societies Al
well known among the Jews of De-
liance has a very broad program, in
troit has been teaching in this city for
the past 20 years, being for 15 years
at the Detroit Conservatory of Music.
Mr. Briglia has his studio at 612
Gladwin building. His residence is at
Opens Sept. 11 Studios for Rent
473 West Hancock avenue.
Among those who studied under Mr.
WILMOT HALL
Briglia are Domanik Mores, soloist of
Available for Concerts, Dances
Dayton, Ohio; Miss Esther Tobler,
and Receptions
soloist and teacher at the Detroit Con-
Glendale 2606
103 Eliot Street
servatory of Music; Carl Donatelli,
orchestra leader in Montreal; Frank
Russo, orchestra leader in the Colon-
ial theater here; A. De Tomaisi, or-
chestra leader at the Fairfield Thea-
ter here; Nathan Otis, first violinist
at the Adams theater,• Michael de
Stefano, Detroit Symphony Orches-
Walker Bldg., 4152 Woodward Av.
tra; Miss Grace Ashdown, teacher at
Birmingham.
VIOLIN, CELLO, PIANO,

The Mabel Guess Studios

MAY LEGGETT-ABEL
VIOLIN SCHOOL

HARMONY

A FREE Scholarship is offered in
Mrs. Abel's class, to be awarded
Sept. 15th. Address

wasaloswoomleICWeNVOMWM'sie.lANICIANICVWCIOCIOLVAIA

SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS

Teacher of Voice

FREDERICK L. ABEL

Mondays and Thursdays.

Business Manager
Glendale 2038
Hemlock 2608-M

602 Gladwin Bldg.
Next Week at 6221 Stanton Ave.

Phone Walnut 172-R for Appointment.

Until Oct. lit at 25 Parsons
Located after October 1, 1922, at 92 South Corridor,
John H. Thompson Arcade, Woodward Avenue,
between Canfield and Forest Avenues. EntranceS
on Woodward and Cass Avenues.
ENROLLING BEGINS MONDAY, OCT. 2
Independent and progressive. Day and Evening
Classes. Thorough training in Drawing and Paint-
ing from Life; Illustration; Composition.
Catalog sent upon request.
Limited students' list.

JOHN P. WICKER, Director

JENNIE M. STODDARD

Detroit School
of Music

1564 Woodward Ave.

FRANZ APEL, M. D.

School Opens Sept. 5th.

Students and teachers prepared
for low and highest examina-
tions.

NEW LANGUAGE
CLASSES NOW
FORMING

Learn French, Spaniel+, Italian, Eng-
lish, Germ. or •ny other modern lan-
guage by the Iterlitz Method, • system
of instruction that admire. ;lenitive re-
sults in the shortext poesible time.
Fall cl.ses •re now forming. Private
Instruction If desired. Day .d Evening.
Low cont. Call, write or phone at once
fur catalg.

We Teach Languages Only,

But We Teach Them Well



, n5 %%

BERLITZ

MINNIE S. WELZ

SCHOOL OF

VOICE

BOILLOTAT MUSIC AND DRAMATIC STUDIOS

Piano, Voice, Violin, Dramatic Art and Theory

Gertrude Carnovsky, Mus. Baca
Harry Nelson Beillot•t, Mus. Bac.
Elizabeth Rohns, Mildred Schaffer, Maud. Purdy, Sara Schonberg,
Anne Mortenson Herm, Harold Marshall
Full Cour.ee in all branches with Certific•tes and Graduation Diplomas.
One year Normal Course for Plano Teachers. Special training for the teaching of
Piano In High Schools. Student• may enroll at any time.
For information apply to

H. N. BOILLOTAT

Suite 7, 10 West Warren fat Woodward)

Garfield 4725

Northway 5049

607 Gladwin Building

1564 Woodward Ave. Cherry 5975

LANGUAGES

E.t. 1878
338 Branch.
630 David Whitney Bldg.
Cherry 6989

itlik1)014

STUDIOS OF

MUSICAL ART

1/4

Hayward Academy of Fine Art

Comprehensive Training in Art and Applied Art.

WHISTLER METHOD

10 Warren West

At Woodward

Studios Opened for Enrollment, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 1922.
Detailed Information Supplied on Application.
Telephone Northway 4369.

Instruction In painting and drawing from the nude and draped life, nit)
artistic anatomy comp.:min., perepective, etc.

In Ad•amed and Elementary Work.
Day and Evening CI
Pupils may Inter at any time.

TERMS REASONABLE

F. HAROLD HAYWARD, Director

Studio, Ream 31.33, 513 Shelby Street, Detroit

Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Pease

Teachers of Singing.

606 Gladwin Bldg.

Cadillac 6107

PASQUALE BRIGLIA

Violinist Inches.
Only serious students accepted.
Assistant for preparatory work.
Residence, 473 Hancock West; Glendale 4104.M.
Studio, 612 Gladwin Building.

E. B. R. SCHOOL OF ACTING

Is Tears In Detroit
SVa ud
! Begins Week of September Ilth In all Departemets.
Acting,
vile, Elocution, Oratory, Motion Picture., Musical Comedy
DANCING—Toe, Ballet, Clog. Soft-Shoo • F.
c, Chorus, Interpretive, Fancy.
Acts Written and Staged. Special teachers for every department.
Beautiful Largo S MADAME
Auditorium In the New Hem..
1306 RANDOPH ST.
MADAME EMMA BUR RAW RAV1LER, Director

IN LITHUNIA, DANZIG

"MY RETURN TO JUDAISM"

Committee of Jewish Delegations De-
mands Minority Right. for Let•
vi•n Jews.

-



NEW YORK.—Following the vic-
tory which the Jews have achieved in
Lithuania in having received consti-
tutional guarantees of their national
rights, the attention of various Jew-
ish agencies, especially the Commit-
tee of Jewish Delegations, has shifted
to Latvia, which is pledged to give
similar rights to the Jews, and to
Danzig, where for a time the rights
of the Jews resident there were
threatened.
In the free town of Danzig there
was issued in I92I a bill on natural-
ization which prejudiced the rights of
the resident Jews. Due to the inter-
vention of the Committee of Jewish
Delegations, the law was modified NO
us to facilitate the naturalization of
Jews. According to the new law, a
continuous residence of five years in-
stead of 10 is necessary to entitle one
to citizenship. Furthermore, any ap-
plicant, to whom the senate had re-
fused the right of naturalization, may
resort to an appeal in the Supreme
Court of Danzig.
Shortly the Committee of Jewish
Delegations will issue a "Black Book"
detailing all the pogroms that have
been perpetrated upon the Jews.

A Startling Human Document.

By E. A. T.

lure away Jews from their faith. "My
return to Judaism" is written with the

blood of the author's heart, and every
word, every line breathes conviction.
The book should he read by every Jew
who is interested in keeping our
younger generation within the fold of
Judaism and every Gentile who seeks
to know the true worth of the work
done by missionaries.
Besides the intrinsic value of the
book, its interett is enhanced by its
preface, written by Rabbi Stephen S.
Wise:
"It is not an easy thing," Dr. Wise
says, "to write a story of one's intel-
lectual error or spiritual blundering.
Frouder has done this simply, graph•
lenity, honestly. His confession ought
to prove serviceable as an illustration
of the unworthiness of the methods
employed by the professional 'mis-
sionaries' to and among the Jew, and
as further proof, though none be need-
ed, of the innate and unaltered stead.
fastness of the Jew in abiding by the
covenant and life of his people."

More interesting than a novel, a re-
markable human document, is the
look "Sly return to Judaism," by
Samuel Frouder, recently published
by the author from 242 Union avenue,
Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Mr. Frouder is
well known for the tragic history of
his life, when, in his youth, he left the
Jewish religion and became a Chris-
tian because he thought he saw "the
true light." It did not take very long
before he discovered his great mis-
take. Ile returned to the religion of
his father, a far better Jew than ever
before. Although by giving up the
Christian religion he had to suffer pri-
vation and dire need. Yet, he is con-
tent to spend the rest of his days as a
true son of Israel, loyal to the faith
of his people.
The book written by Mr. Frothier,
uncovers for the first time, in a sin-
Peace is the vessel in which all
cere and most thrilling narrative, the
practices of missionaries, and exposes God's blessings are presented to 1.1
the ways and means used by them to and preserved by us.—The Talmud.

ANNOUNCING THE REMOVAL OF
THE

THESE THANKS FOR YOU
—IF YOU GAVE YOUR BIT

Typical of many letters that conic
to the Joint Distribution Committee
out of the lands of Jewish misery, is
the following from the Jewish com-
munity of Tchernobil, a tiny Jewish
settlement of 276 families, approxi•
mutely 1,060 souls, saved from death
by American generosity:
"We, the citizens of Tchernobil,
herewith acknowledge that the 30
food packets received by our repre-
sentative were distributed to the suf-
fering people of this community, and
we express our deep gratitude to our
brethren in America for their gener-
ocity to us in our great distress. We
hope that our dear brothers and sis-
ters will not refrain from continuing
to extend their help to us, because our
need is great."
The 30 food packets sent to tin r-
nobil contained 1618 pounds of flour,
820 pounds of rice, 329 pounds of sug-
ar, 38 pounds of tea and 600 tins of
condensed milk.

EAST SIDE FAVORS
COWAN FOR SHERIFF

for

The spirited contest
office of
sheriff has attracted much attention
among Detroit Jews, inasmuch as all
of the candidates are well known in
Jewish circles. Many leading citizens
of the Jewish faith have come out in
active support of County Auditor
Cowan, who has been leading an ag-
gressive campaign throughout the
county.
Mr. Cowan promises an administra-
tion that will be free from prejudice
and bias of all kinds. It is a plank
in his platform that, if elected, all
prisoners will be given fair and im-
partial consideration.
In the administration of his office
as County Auditor, Mr. Cowan has
made many friends because of his ef-
ficiency, courtesy and interest. Un-
der his direction the tract index sys-
tem was developed and he has im-
pressed the public with his business.
like management of the county's af-
fairs.
Jack Cowan, according to his
friends, has all of the good qualities
which go to make an effective admin-
istration of the sheriff's office. A
veteran of the World War, he is
known for his courage and gameness.
Mr. Cowan is a simple, approachable
man and in his personal career has
never put on airs and it is fair to
assume that in his administration of
the county jail he will be equally dem-
ocratic and tolerant.

TO

*14

IVY CORSET
SHOP

1506 WASHINGTON BLVD.

RE•ELECT

Newman Smith

Republican Candidate for

STATE LEGISLATURE

Primaries, Sept. 12, 1922

000000000000000000000

DEMOCRATS OF FIFTH, SEVENTH, NINTH WARDS:

Vote for

HENRY A.

BEHRENDT

FOR

STATE SENATOR

Second District

0000{:}0-000000000000000000-0000000000000000

U. S. HEGGBLOM IS

FRIEND OF LABOR

U. S. Ileggblom, candidate for
member in the State Legislature from
the First District, was born in Michi-
gan. He is a student of governmental
and civic affairs, being a graduate of
the Detroit College of Law. During
the World War he served as Quarter.
master aboard U. S. S. Search.
Mr. flegghlom was a member of the
faculty of the Detroit College of Law
from 1919 to 1921. He was a Michi-
gan delegate to the national conven-
tion of the "Committee of 48" in 1920.
He is a friend of labor, a Progressive
Republican, independent and opposed
to all self-seeking factions.

H. A. BEHRENDT FAVORS
REDUCTION OF TAXES

Henry A. Behrendt, Democratic
candidate for State Senator from the
Second District, to be voted on at the
primaries this Tuesday, is a practic-
ing attorney. He has lived in Detroit
for approximately 24 years. He says
that the county of Wayne has not
been given a square deal on the ques-
tion of taxation, as compared with
other counties, and if elected will use
every effort to equalize the taxes
which Wayne county has to pay.
"Our justice courts in this city
should be revised," says Mr. Behrendt,
"similar to the plan in vogue in To-
ledo today, appointing two more jus-
tices to hear "poor man's cases" in-
volving amounts not less than $50.
"My platform, briefly, is: Equaliz-
ation of taxes for Wayne county, re-
duction of taxes, light wine and beer
and reorganization of the justices
courts."

A Vote for

JUDGE CHAS. L. BARTLETT

Will Make Detroit's Streets Safe.

Primaries Sept. 12.

Walter Gurski

Republican Candidate for

STATE SENATOR

Second District

Wards 5, 7, 9

Primaries, Sept. 12, 1922

COWAN

"BOB" SPEED RUNNING
FOR CITY PROSECUTOR

Jewish friends of Robert T. Speed,
who is running for the Republican
nomination for prosecutor, are follow-
ing his campaign with • great deal
of interest and many of them proph-
esy that if elected he will make a sen-
sationally good record.
Mr. Speed is looked upon as one of
the greatest trial lawyers in Wayne
county, having represented the people
in the cases of Michael Greeson, Mor-
ris Coleman and Madame Lewan, who
was convicted of murdering little Max
Ernest.
As assistant prosecutor, "Bob"
Speed was one of the strong figures
during the administration of Prose-
cutors .lasnowski, Bishop and Voor-
hies. Because of his aggressive spirit
he was known as the "Fighting Prose-
cutor," being frequently compared
with such figures as Senator Johnson,
District Attorney Jerome and Francis
J. Henry.

Be humble to thy superior. affable
to thy inferior and meet every man
with friendliness.—The Talmud.
Ca

A Courageous, Unprejudiced, Broad-minded

Man who has the endorsement of leading

Jewish Citizens in His Campaign

For Sheriff

Primaries, Sept. 12, 1922

This Ad Paid for by a friend of Mr. Cowan.

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